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May 05, 1927 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-05-05

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ESTABLISHED
1890

it ian

4::3 ttl

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

t---

VOL. XXXVIL No. 154

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 5, 1927

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

r

WOLVERINES TROUNCE
PURDUE NINE TO WIN
FIRST BIGTENGAME
TIMELY HITTING BY ICHIGAN
BATSMEN DRIVES DAVIES
TO COVER IN FIFTH
CORRIDEN GETS HOMER
Miller Pitches Airtight Ball, While
Oosterbaan Registers Four
Hits For 11.4 Score
(Special to The Daily)
LAFAYETTE, May 4-Michigan hit
the ball with regularity here, today,
and Don Miller, pitching a grudge
game against Purdue, avenged the
defeat which he suffered in the first
Conference game of the season, play-j
ed at Ann Arbor.
Miller was airtight in the game to-
day, the Boilermakers garnering only,
six hits during the entire game. Not
until the eighth inning, when the;
Wolverines had already scored nine
runs, did Miller ease up "and allow
the home team to score. Maxton, ace
of the Purdue hurling staff, was un-
able to oppose Miller on the mound
because of a sore arm, and Davies{
satrted in his place, Davies was un-1
able to hold the invaders, however,
and was yanked at the end of the
fifth, after Michigan had already scor-
ed seven runs.
Corridgn, Coach Fisher's star out-
fielder, made one of the longest hits
in the history of Stuart field when he
clouted a homer in the fourth inninga
with no one on base. Corriden's hit
travelled to the extreme right boun-
dlary of the field, and was an easy
homer.
If the Michigan team failed to show
in the pinches in other games,-it cer-1
tainly was not lacking in batting
strength today. Corriden in addi-
tion to his four base blow, account-
ed for two singles. Benny Ooster-
baan, batting sixth in the lineup was
the heavy hitter of the day, with four
hits in five trips to the plate, one of
which went for two bases. t
Every Michigan player earned at
least one safe hit with the exception
of Weintraub, third baseman, and
Reichman, substitute catcher. Besides
the fine work of Oosterbaan and Cor-'
riden, - Puckelwartz, Michigan's cap-
tain, and Gilbert, right fielder, each
slammed out three safe hits.
The invaders threatened from the
very start, although men were left
on scond and third bases when the
first inning ended. The team con-
tinued its hitting, with two runs be-
ing scored in the second and third.
Only in three innings of the game
did the Wolverines fail to score at
least one run.
The scores:

MILLER'S HURLING
DEFEATS PURDUE
gg
Don Miller
Star Wolverine twirler, who pitch-
ed Michigan to her first Conferenc
victory over Purdue, yesterday, 11-4.
Miller allowed the Boilermakers only
six hits, and himself drove out a
three-bagger.

0fFICIAL TIMERS SEE
WEISSMULLER SMASH

Grinnell Elected To
Lead Sophomores In
Annual Class Games;

LAST OPPORTUNITY TO'
REGISTER F0 0VOTING!

'HONOR OIEYW l
HOLD BANQUET TODAY
Phi Beta Kappa Will Install Members
At Banquet Tonight, In Main
Dining Room Of Union
HOBBS IS TOASTMASTER,
Phi Beta Kappa, international hono-
rary scholastic fraternity, will hold
its annual initiation banquet at 6:15
o'clock tonight in the main dining(
room of the Union, with the. principal
address of the evening being given by#
Prof. Grant Showerman of the lan-
guage department of the University
of Wisconsin. His subject will be
"Freedom-1927."
The binquet will be attended by more
than 150 members of the local chapter
of the organization, including the 83,
students from the literary college and
School of Education, who were formal-
ly initiated yesterday afternoon in
I Angell hall.
jProf. William H. Hobbs of the geo-
logy department, and president of the
local chapter, will act as toastmaster,
and will welcome the new members.
I Sue Grundy Bonner '27, and Clarencel
C. Hostrup, '27, will respond for Ithe
initiates.
Professor Showerman, who was the
annual professor to the American
Academy in Rome, 1922-1923, has beenr
connected with the classics depart-
i ment of the University of Wisconsin
since 1900. He is the holder of nume-
rous honorary degrees and positions.
Tickets for the banquet will be $1.50
and may be obtained from P. F.
Weatherill of the chemistry depart-
ment, secretary of the local Phi Beta
Kappa chapter. Invitations have been
extended to all the alumni of the chap-
ter, according to Prof. C. 0. Davis of
the School of Education, who has
charge of the arrangements for the
banquet.
WASHINGTON Students in com-
bined courses for A. B., and L.L. B.I
degrees must now complete their work
entirely in arts or science before en-
tering the law school.

t

[1 1 IWOR IEC O 1R ' b=Meeting yesterday afternoon in Na-
tural Science auditorium,nmembers
of the class of '29 elected Harry S.
Grinnell as captain to lead the soh-
MIARKS FALL FOR 100 YARIS, 200 omore class against the freshmen in
YARDS, 200 METERS AND the annual spring encounter which
220 YARDS will be held tomorrow afternoon and
Saturdlay morning.
FRESMEN OMPEE Jmes P. lFoyer, '27, chairman of}
FRESHMENCOMPETE ?j '"".
the Spring games committee outlin-
1d the program of events and ex-
Annual Dual Meet With Varsity Marks plained the rules of the traditional
Final Appearance Of Captain interclass contests.1
Sampson; Darnell Stars Sophomores of all schools and col-
leges will assemble at 2:30 o'clock
Four of Johnny Weismuller's 55 as- tomorrow afternoon at Waterman
sorted world records from 40 to 500 gymnasium, preparatory to -leading
yards in both the long and short pools the march to the river after their
wer slshe yeteray n te Uionside of the river is determined by a
were slashed yesterday in the Union coin flin between captains of the two
tank, when the great I. A. C. swimmer, classes. The march to South Ferry
timed by 17 official watches, raced in field on Saturday morning will start
:51, 1:56 4-5, 2:08, and 2:09 respecti- at 9 o'clock from the same place,
vely, 100 yards, 200 yards, 200 meters, ! foyer stated.-
and 220 yards. All sophomore members of the Var-
"Those old records are all too sity band, in addition to any other
slow," Weismuller beamed confidently second year men having band in-
shortly before plunging into the water struments are requested to report to
to accomplish what was undoubtedly Waterman gymnasium at 2 o'clock
one of the greatest feats in all swim- tomorrow afternoon, Grinnell stated.
ming history if not in the annals of W. E. Nissen, J. Mandelstan, F. B.
all sport, and the confidence of the Carney, J. P. Meagher, George McAr-
"optimistic young 'cuss' who is slated thur, G. Steinecker, S. H. Mallory, J.
to do even greater things," according Kelly, J. Hall and J. Holpuck were
to his coach, William Bachrach, was appointed by Grinnell as lieutenants
not to be denied. to assist in the direction of thQ soph-
On the way to the three longer of omore steam roller against any pos-
the new marks established last night sible opposition offered by the first
before the capacity crowd which filled year men.
every point of vantage in the Union
each 25 yard mark: 11 seconds, :25,,
:39 3-5, :54 2-5, 1:09 3-5, 1:25 1-5,
1:41, and then the new marks which -
shaved 3 2-5, 7 3-5, and 6 1-5 seconds I
from his existing standards. 1 11 TU DENT COUNCIL
His remarkable perfomaces were all
the more astounding to the spectators
when it was remembered that the old Smith, Snodgrass And Starrett Are
records have all stood long on the Named To Rn For Presidency
record books. In march, 1922, at Of Next Year's Body
Honolulu, Weissmuller set the former O
200 meters (218 2-3 yards) mark at OTHERS ARE SELECTED
2:15 3-5. , Last year at McKeesport,
Pa., he set the old 220 record; and on At a meeting of the nomination com-
the Pacific coast in 1923 and 1925 he mittee of the Student council held last
made the old 100 and 200 yard records.
Charles D. Lynch, president of the night, Courtland C. Smith, '28, John
Michigan A. A. U., stated immediately T. Snodgrass, '28E, and John E. Star-
after the exhibition that the Anew rett, '28E, were nominated for the
times will be sent to the International presidency of next year's Student
Swimming federation for ratification council. These three men will run
by that body, which should be forth- for the office in the annual all-campus
coming without much deliberation in election next Wednesday.
view' of the authentic timers. The following men were nominated
In conjunction with Weissmuller's for senior representatives on the
exhibition the annual dual meet be- council at the same meeting: George
E tween the Varsity and freshman tank Annable, '28; Wayne Cowell, '28E;
teams was held, marking the final ap- Charles Gilbert, '28; Robert Halsted,
pearance of Capt Paul Samson, who '28E; John Hedrick, '28; Marion
won his specialty at 500 yards by less Hodgson, '28E; Leo Hoffman, '28L;
than five yards from Oult, the Cana- Ellis Merry, '28; and Russell Sauer, '28.
dian yearling, in 6:11 3-5. The candidates for council positions
Second only to the performance of from the junior class will be the
Weissmuller was Captain-elect Dar- following: Durwin Algyer, '29; Fred
all's time of :60 3-5 for 100 meters, Asbeck, '29; Harlan Cristy, '29; John
one full second better than the ex- Gilmartin, '29E; George Hubble, '29E;
isting national intercollegiate stand- John Keane, '29D; John Knight, '29;
ard of :61 3-5 set by Howell, North- Russell Sanderson, '29; and Edward
western, in 1924. Wachs, '29.
Michigan's Conference' and national It is impossible to run for the presi-
championship relay squad was forced I dency of the Student council by peti-
to the limit to eke out a narrow victory tion under the present constitution.
in the initial event ?n the program. I Candidates for senior or junior posi-
Walker, who later again beat Seager tions may circulate petitidns, which
of the Varsity in the 50 yard race, must contain the names of at leas
gained a short advantage over the Var- ten per cent of the men in each school
sity lead-off man, an advantage which or college of the University and, wher
was not relinquished to the final lap submitted, must be approved by the
of the 250 yard contest. nominating committee. Such petitions
Hosmer and Walker, freshmen, led must be filed with the secretary of the
Seager to the finish in the short sprint council, Henry Grinnell, '28, before
in the good time of :25 1-5, while Wal- noon on May 7.
aitis won the only other first place for I _____________
the yearlings when he captured pre- -W-G
I mier honors in the fancy diving. Glee Club Will Givec
' CHICAGO-Men will wear tuxedos 68th Home Concert
at the Interclass Hop this year.

1~ UH1H EHU MIUUEN I!
BOOTHS WILL BE OPEN FROM 9;
UNTIL 4 O'CLOC ON
CAMPUS
ELECTION IS WEDNESDAY I
Henry Grinnell, William Jeffries Andj
Roger Greene Are To Run For
iPresidency Of Union
Today will be the last opportunity
for students to register to vote in the
annual elections which will be held
next Wednesday, May 11, it was an-I
nounced by officers of the Student
council yesterday. Booths on the cam-
pus will be open from 9 o'clock this!
morning until 4 o'clock this afternoonI
convenient to all students and thos-
wishing .to vote in the elections must
register today.
A large number of students regist-
ered yesterday, it was reported, and I
all the names taken will be checked
carefully with the University records
in order to avoid duplication. The
blanks for registration have been con-
siderably shotened this year and the
process is thereby expedited consid-
erably.
WHERE TO REGISTER
Lits: In front of the Library I

TO THE STUDENTS
The largest percentage of the
Ivoting population in the United
States is composed of educated
people. It is understood that
whr there is intelligence there
Iis the feeling of responsibility
for citizenship, which carries
with it the duty to vote in elec-
tions for public office.
The University may be consid-
eredt a miniature of the nation; j
1its students are its citizens; andl I
each student owes it to lis uni-
versity to vote intelligently at
I the coning campus elections
next Wednesday. In order to
vote, a student must register,
and today is the last day- of
registration. Since the Univer-
sity is an educational institutioj,
it is the duty of every student ?
to show that he appreciates the
obligation which is his-that of I
expressing a voice in the elec-
tions. Register today and vote
Wednesday!
--EDITORS OF TIHE DAILY

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and Angell hall.
Engineers: Engineers arch.
Laws: Law building.
Architects: Engineers arch.
Dents: Dental building.
Eds: In front of Library.
Pharmics: In front of Library.
Medics: In laboratory sec-
Bus. Ads.: In front of Library.
tions.
TIME: 9 to 4 o'clock today
tomorrow.

FIFTH ANNUAL PRESS
CLUB CONVENTION TO
OPEN THIS AFTERNOON
MORE THAN 300 DELEGATES ARE
EXPECTED TO
ATTEND
BRUMM VILL SPEAK
I)iscussin Gronps And lTour Of Cam-
pus Will Follow 'opening Address
By Journalism Professor
I

I~

Michligan
AB

Loos, 2b .......... 5
Weintraub, 3b ... .4
Morse, s.......... 5
Corriden, If4.......
Puckelwartz, cf 5
Oosterbaan, lb 5
Gilbert, rf.........5
Reichman, c.......4
Miller, ?.........5
Totals............42

R
1
0
1
2
2
2
1
1
1

II
1
0
1
3
0,
4:
3
0
1

,0
3
2
1
0
3
12
2
4
0

A
1
5
3
1
0
1
0
0
3
14

1
0
01
0'
0l
0
0;
0)
2'

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al
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Officers for all the major student{
positions open to election will be filledI
at the election next Wednesday, in-I
cluding those of the Union, the Oroa-I
torical association, the Student Coun-(
cil, the Student Christian association,1
the Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications, and the Board in Control of
Athletics. Student members only will
be elected to' the latter two boards.
Nominations for the positions in the
Union were made Tuesday and those
who will run for the presidency of that'
organization include Roger Greene, I
'28, William Jeffries, '28, and Henry
Grinnell, '28. Women students are
allowed to vote for all offices except
those of the Union, the Student coun-
cil, aid the Student Christian associa-
tion, and it is probable that at least,
two women will run for offices in the
Oratorical association. ,
Complete reports of nominations
will be made in a few days, and un-
official ballots printed. Officers ofI
the Student council are especially de-
sirous of having a large turnout of;
votes at the impending election be-.
I cause they feel that all students should!
take the opportunity they have of par-
ticipating in their campus activities
and student government.
Nominations by petition may stillf
be made for all of the offices except
those in the Oratorical association,!
whose date of closing was Tuesday.
Those interested in this method of
nomination should confer with mem-
bers of the Student council committeej
immediately, it was announced.
More than 1,800 students registeredI
yesterday, and though this is about
( 100 less than last year officials of the
Student council expect that the total
will be as large as before when the
returns from today are made.
Doctors Canfield An

AWARD CONSTRUCTION"
CONTRATT PEC
Preliminary Work On Woman's Ath-
letie Building Is Scheduled To
Begin Immediately
PALMER FIELD LEVELLED
Work preliminary to the erecting
of the new athletic field house for
women will begin immediately upon
the awarding of the general contract
to the Snence Brother Co., contractors'
of Saginaw, Mich. by the Board in
Control of Athletics, according to a
late announcement from the Adminis-
tration building.
The architectural plans for the wo-
men's field house were let several
months ago upon the official an-
nouncement of a proposed athletic
building for women to be erected on
Palmer field. Since the initial
announcement the work of leveling
Palmer field has gone on continuous-
ly until with the last few days when
the work has been nearing an end.
Several small hills have been cut
down during the last few months in
order to afford a level playing field
for the outdoor activities of the wo-
men students.
.Spence Brothers will start work on
the erection of the field house im-
mediately in order to complete the
building for the first sent.ster of
next year. The contractors awarded
the project are also at present erect-
ing the new museum building, which
will be located opposite the new field
house.
According to the plans for the field
house, the first floor will be mainly
reception rooms with a large and spa-
cious hall. Kitchens and a first- aid
booth will also be on the first floor.
The general plan of the exterior will
be of the old colonial type, with a
long porch eltending the length of
the building and leading on to the
playing field. In the basement will he
over 1,000 lockers for women and
shower baths and team rooms. The
second floor will also conatin lockers
l and dressing booth's. The estimated
cost of the building alone will run
around $275.000, according to the
!preliminary sketches. With the excep-
tion of bowling alleys no athletic
events will be contested within the
field house.
COLORADO-Each year the fresh-
Smen present the outstanding man of
their class with a brown derby.
d Bunting Lecture

Registration and the opening session
will be the main features of the first
lay of the fifth annual Michigan In-
trescholastic Press Association con-
vention in Ann Arbor today. More
than 300 delegates from throughout
the state- are expected to attend the
convention.
Delegates are expected to register
in the main lobby of the Union, pre-
ferably this morning although it will
be possible to do so until late in the
afternoon, according to Cassam A.
Wilson, '27, general chairman of the
convention.
Prof. John I. Brumm, head of the
journalism department, will give the
opening address and extend a wel-
come to the delegates at the opening
session in the Union at 2:30 o'clock.
At 3:30 o'clock the general assembly
will adjourn and separate into discus-
sion groups. The groups and leaders
are announced as follows: editorial
writing, Smith H. Cady, Jr., '27, and
W. Calvin Patterson, '27, retiring man
aging editor and editor of The Daily,
respectively; feature writing, Donal
Hamilton Haines; sports, Wilton
Simpson, '27, sports editor of The
Daily; advertising writing, Thomas
Sunderland, upper staff member of The
Daily business .department; general
problems, Profesor Brumm; news
gathering and writing, Howard P.
Jones, of the journalism department;
business management of an annual,
Frank Graham, '27, business manager
of the Michiganensian; art in the an-
nual, Bryan Hunt, '28, next year's
busiess manager of the Michiganen-
sian.
A general tour of the campus con-
ducted by members of the Sigma Delta
Chi and Blue Key will be started at
4 o'clock. The convention is being
sponsored by Sigma Delta Chi, national
honorary journalistic fraternity, Theta
Sigma, women's journalistic fraternity,
and the journalism department of the
University.
The general assembly wil meet at
9:30 o'clock tomorrow morning to
hear Gail E. Densmore of the public
speaking department in the main ad-
dress of the morning. Following this,
discussion groups will meet from
10:30 o'clock until noon when a lun-
cheon will be held in the-Union.
President Clarence Cook Little will
give the main address of the afternoon
starting at 3 o'clock in the Union.
Following President Little's address,
th'e general assembly will adjourn to
attend the first activities in the .an-
i nual spring games. At 6 o'clock the
annual banquet will be held, Coach.
Fielding H. Yost, and Prof. William A.
Frayer of the history department be-
ing the main speakers for the occa-
sion.
Saturday morning two technical ad-
dresses will be heard. Palmer Booth-
by of the Jahn and Ollier Company,
Chicago, will give an illustrated lec-
ture in Natural Science auditorium,
and E. C. Oakes of the Iorton-
Beimer Press of Kalamazoo will
speak in the Union. Following these
addresses the general meeting for the
election of offlc>s will take place,
the assembly adjourning at 10:30
e o'clock to attend the spring games.
Saturday afternoon the women at-
tending the convention will be enter-
tained at a tea given by Theta Sigmna
in Martha Cook domitory. Others
will 1 attend the Iowa-Michigan track
meet and the Illinois-Michigan base-
ball game.

11 16 47

Purdue
ABRH 0
Flock, cf........... 4 1 1 1
Lyle, 3b.......... 2102
Rabe,Ili .......... 4 0 1 11
Cooper, if .........4 0 1 1
Wilcox, 2b .........4 0 023
Ramby, rf4..2..... 4021
Kemmer, ss....... 4 0 0 3
Eickmann, c........4 0 0 4
Davies, p........... 2 1. 0 1
Smith, p .......... 2110
Totals. ........34 4 6 27
Score by innings:

A E
1 0
2 0
1 1
0 2
4 0
1 1
7 0
0 1
0 0
0 0
16 5

i

Michigan......... . 022 122 002-11
Purdue............. 000 000 040- 4
Two base hits-Oosterbaan. Three ,
base hits-Miller. -Tome runs--Corri-
den. Sacrifice hits-Weintraub. Struck
out- Miller 2, Davies 1, Smith 1.
Base on balls-Miller 4, Smith 1. Hit
by pitcher-Davies (Loos, Reichman).I
PASS AMENDMENT I
TO CONSTITUTION
At their regular meeting held last,
night at the Union, members of th,
Student council passed an amendment
to the constitution of that body pro- 1
viding that the presidents of the sen-
ior lierary, law, engineering, medical,
and dental classes be ex-officio mem-
-bers of the Student council for a trial
period of one year beginning next fall

America's First Roller Skating Meet
Keeps Industrious Lawyers From Study

By Timothy Hay
And not a lawyer studied last night.
More than 3,000 persons were pres-
ent for America's first skating meet,
under the auspices of Martha Cook
building, for the benefit of thegwell-
known League fund, last night on
South University ave. Of this total
about 1,000 skated, a hundred merely
attempted to, and the rest watched
for tumbles from the sidelines.
With the Varsity band, the Reserve
band, and a caliope, the music was
loud enough to drown out the skates
at times, and all in all it kept the;
whole lawyers club from studying
which is something worth while.
South University was lined from

can itself, to say nothing-it spoke
for itself of the caliope, the street
took on the appearance of a carnival.t
In the "locomotion parade" held
following the races, Harold Diepslef,
15, carried off the prize of a hand-car
toy because he was carried in a
stretcherby four students on roller
skates, the judges basing their decis-
ion on the grounds that he travelled
by rollers with the least effort.
Charles Flowers, of the Ann Arbor
high school, won a kewpy doll as first
prize in the men's race, with Donald
Kennedy, '30, taking second. No girl's
race was held.
A gold plated skate key was won
by Nelson Otto by his fancy skating
exhibition.

Presenting the 68th annual homeR
concert, the Varsity glee club will ap-
pear at., 815 o'clock tonight in Hill!
auditorium for a student program I
which will include more chorus work
than usual, and numerous specialty;
numbers. Mrs. Fredericka Hull, solo-I
ist in the First Presbyterian church
of Detroit, and spoken highly of byZ
crjtics, will sing "Omnipotence" with
the glee club chorus, and a solo num-
ber "Ocean, Thou Mighty Monster"
taken from the opera "Oberon" by
von Weber. Mrs. Hull is one of the
few out of town singers to participate
in a glee club concert.
The selections used tonight will be
largely classical and semi-classical,
including Negro spirituals, and several
modern numbers besides the classical
work.
Among the soloists will be Kenneth
Midgley, '28L, who was xylophone
soloist on the spring concert tour of
the upper peninsula recently made
4 1-OhoT~acit hag Rnvd.n sn_ -

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On Concluding Michigan Radio Program
"Most of the chronic and acute dis- Dr. Bunting saw fermentation of su-
eases of the ear are the result ofse- gar in the teeth by the aid of the
vere head colds and trouble with the Bacillus acidophilus as the cause of
nose and throat, Dr. R. Bishop Can- I
field, professor of otolarngology, and 'decay of the teeth. He advised fre-3
specialist in the diseases of the ear, quent thorough cleaning of the teeth,
nose, and throat, said last night in!and regulation of the diet as the best
the first of two talks over the final preventatives for tooth decay. A large
program of the Michigan night ser- amount of sugar in the diet is a great
iesbro asoer siogan WgJse- help to the decay of the teeth, Dr.
ies, broadcast over station WWJ, theBnig ad
Detroit News. The other speaker, Dr. Bunting said.
Russell W. Bunting, professor of den- The numbers that the Varsity band
tal histology and pathology gave alplayed were: "The Victors," "Bridal
lecture on the "Prevention of the De- I Rose Overture, "The Men clf the
cay of the Teeth." The Varsity band Maize and Blue", "Lustpiel Overture",
under the direction of Norman Lar- "Varsity", and "The Yellow and the
son, and Kenneth C. Midgley, '28L, E Blue." Midgley played a marimba-
( rmmnitat tiat nroam ,nhnne soln. "Melodv" and Marshall

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Senate Votes More
Funds To University
(By Associated Press)
The University was voted $2,700,000
for new buildings and land, $8,400,000
for maintainance and operation and a
possible additional sum of $2,350,000
by the Senate today.
The University mill tax, now reduc-
ed to 5.5 mill without restriction,
amounting to an annual fund of ap-
proximately $4,200,000 for maintain-
nn A -a o.tn mo nra. antae ,inder

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