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March 13, 1927 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-13

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Published every morning except lion
dugring the Utiv&siW ° be i bftwr '4
Control of Student t FoIcation..

L1 the proposed death penalty bill, per-
haps on the thedry thiat they were
More directly concerned with it than

r'iL

Members of Wcwtera Confermoe EditorIl
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en"
titled to the use for repuablication of all news"
dispatches credited to it or not othe~rwise
credited in this~ paper and the' local zn Ws pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice' at Ail Arbor,
Michigan, as second clas iiittkr. Sii'ecial rate
of postafe granted by Third Assistit' Pose,-
w~aster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4 00..
.Offices: Ann's Arbor Press' Building; May-
psard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 492S; Business 03144
EDIThIAL STAFF
Telephone 4926
MAiNAUAQ 1UITO
SITH H. CADY. Jil.
"dtor.......- ...i. «..1w. Calvin .*stterspn"
Cite Editor. .......'......... Irwin A. OMi,
News Editors ............., Fre4,tack Shillito
tPhilip C. Brooks
Women's Editor ............. Mariou K~biik
Sports Editor...........,Wilton A. Simttigis
Telegraph Editor ........... Mortis 'Zwerdting
Xusic and Drama....... Vincent C. Weal, Is.
N4ight Editors
Charles Behyiner Ellis Mere
Carlton Chazixje St..nfeord V. Ph14ps'
o Chamberlin Courtand C. Smtith
James Herald C"ssam A,,, Wilson
Aseltant City 2ditopre
Ctrl Burger Henry Thurnan'
;bseph Bruanswick
*eporters
tasloi Anderson Paul Kern
Margaret Arthur Milton Kirshibaum
Jean Campbell Sally Knox
Jessie Church'Ric rd urvisak.
Chester E. Clark B.on" I!ci'eal
Margaret Clarke Kenneth' P'sttck'
d33anchard W.' Cleland Mary Ptolny'
Clarence kdelson M~oris Qi~hn
William Emiery" ' Jamers 5 e)haf
Alfred Les Poater NC! on J. Smith, Jr.
Robert E. Finch Sylvi*' Stone
Robert Gessner ? Mary Louise Taylor
Margaret Gross William T.' ur'naua
Elaine Gruber Milf ord Vanik
Coliman 3.Gleacer lherbert L. Vedd&t
Harvey 3 Gusiderson Marian Welles
Stewart Hooker' Thaddeusa WR iel ski
Norton B. Icove Sherwood ,Winsl~
BVSINESS $TAFF ,
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS )4tAQEA~g
PAUL W. AIRIJ1,T
Advrtiing.........Williamx C. Pusch
Advertising. ..'..Thomaa Siuerlmnd
Advertising ........George I. Apna le Jr.
Advertising......Laurence 3. .yW1.
Circulation............... T. Keunnth a~ven
Publication...... ..... Jahn 1H, Dobrnk
Accounts........ ...ranc~p A, Norqi t
Asistants
George Abut Jr.' Esther Booze
D. M. Browneriilda Bizet
Florence Coopler Mario;,A. Lpusel
A. M. Hinkiey Bestrlic tb e
E. L. Hulse Seliaa M A#*
R. A. Meyer' Mas
William F. Spencer lro;J.. g"~a
RayoldUtley-' e°$ T
jB. Wood
SUNDAY, MARCH 13, 192'?

ianyone else.
INo doubt the murderers should be
*fvitally ,concerned with the bill. One
*might $a0 it way a matter of life and
death to them. But whether or not
their views on the bill would be worth
anything is subject to speculation.
Senator' Jankowski's intentions are
laudable but his techiqu ie is a bit
faulty.
TIME TO CHIANG~E
With subtle rumors already afloat
concerning the possible candidacies of
this student and that for campus
offices in the annual spring elections,
agitation for improyementa inthe
general political manouverings here
does not. appear impertinent at this
time. Tice' elections" are scheduled for
May 11 far enough in the future to
permit plenty of constructive criti-
cism, followed by definite action ,if
the' campus will respond on the
rtrength of conditions it realizes full
well to exist.
For severak years, at least, ,the more
slgntflcant campus offices have been
.closely linked with organized politi-
cal machines,8 It is generally known,
for instanices, that the president of the
Uionu, the president of the Student
Council, and other lesser incumbents,
ar'e elected as. the result of' personal
house-to-house campaigns' conducted
by friends, or the strength of a cer-
tain facton, rather than on the basis
of efficiency for office, experience in
such work, or personality.
Far too often, it is the W'ashtenaw
crowd- pitted against the State street
fraternities; or the ""independents"
and La* club bucking a' certain group
of houses, :iand so on. There' has been'
altogther too much railroading into
pfice at the expense of the office
itseli, to say nothing of the lowering
of 'Michigan's' prestige when a certain
type of student represents a ;campus.
organizationi an its executive.
if politics on the campus are' desir-
able-as training for later years, or
any other reason-it is time they un-
derwent a change' here. A 'sound plan,
is needed to' replace the' old methods
of election this year. Then, action
by' the Student Council must follow.
iAs ameans of obtaining expression on'
As a means of obtaining expression on
eal, The 'Daily w1i welcome sugges-
tions or any possible plans for such
liprovemzent.
Ji1UNG$IN kRANCE ANI ITALY'

The J-Hop committee is going tol
have a eeting according to the Daily
Bulletin. Let's hope one of them hape-
pens to remnemfber that they were sup-
posed to give ouit favors for this year's
flop.
Maybe the reason for their meeting
is that they want to collect the favors,
they themselves took and distribute
the~m to the "5t paying customers whoI
had to do without.
Anyway, nobody who took a girl to}
the flop (except a .committeeman)
has had anything to put in those .bill-
folds until now.
- s s*

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Music and DramaI

BOOKS

GRAHAtIS

TIHE MINES' PLAYS'

DOWN THE DIAGONAL 1
"President Little," the Jolly '
' junior said yesterday, "was seen
going into the Betsy Ross shop.
Maybe he was going t get a free
Clippy sundae."
t
END TO ALL CONFERENCE
CHAMPIONSHIPS IS SEEN
No longer will Michigan Rule the
West. It's all a thing of the past,
now, and we might as well admit it.
For the managers of the theaters have
offered free shows to students after
every conference championiship. We're
willing to bet Michigan won't win
another one for the next ten years.
The theaters issued a neat little
statement yesterday with that prom-
ise in it. The only trouble with it is
that they give the Student' council
the power to make the arrangements.
IThat means we won't get the shows
even if, we do win a championship.
F~or the council will never wake upI
soon enough to make the arrange-
ments far enough in advance.
WHICHI PICTURE!
Then the question arises ,as to
'which picture is to be shown. The
rRe'solution, states that this' will be left~
up to the council. They Can have any E
'one showing ini town at 'the time. If
the Majority of the members have
seen the' best picture then showing,
they will vote for one of the others,
and the rest of 'us will' have to suffer.
And if there' happens" to be a po-
litical movie in town--like' this "Her
H~onor The Governor" which' is show-
ing' at the Wuerth-the council will
immediately decide that ought to be
shown in the Auditorium, merely as
propaganda' for their profession.
CHEMIISTRY DE~PARTMENT'
WILL HAVE TO BE CLOSED
'We always said it was wrong to
educate anybody. And we have tried
Tour best to remain imi'mune. It is pre-
sumed that some chemistry student
put some of his laboratory experi-
mnents into practice' Friday night. At
any rate somebody' let loose chemicals
in° the Arc which got a rise out of the
audience' right' away.
As long as this' custom has been
established here, let' use it to the
best advantage. Why can't we' all
carry around individual portions of
th'e stuff, so that when we disagree
with what a professor says in a lec-
ture we can just shoot it at himi?
* * s*

Last night Karel Capek's sturdy
and robust., melodrama concluded a.
week's runs with a sold-out house-
the campus having evinced latent in-1
terest in 'the amfusinig ' blood and
thunder of the Theater Guild success.:
Turning, then, from this field,' a new I
type of play has been chosen for the!
next production-this time a farce'
comedy, "To the Ladies,", by George'
jKaufman and Marc Connelly. "To the
Ladies" will open on Monday night,
March 22, and will play througfh the
week.
The choice was the result of sud-
den change in. plans at the last mo-
ment, since' "Hell Bent fer Heaven,"
the Hughes Pulitzer Prize play was
already cast and ready for rehearsal.'
That vehicle has' been postponed for
a later presentation and the Kaufman-
SConnelly comedy is to take its place.
Several plays of this nature were con -
sidered, notably "The Butter and 'Eggi
Man" by Kaufman, "Pigs" 'the John1
Golden success) and "Aren't We All?"
(the Frederick Lonsdale comedy.) It
was later decided that "To the Ladies"!
offered the most opportunities for the
talents of the organization, and this
play' was selected. The Kaufman-
Connelly combination is-} famous' for
its comedy, both in "To the Ladies"~
and in "Merton of the Movies," their-
other major success.
The cast has been practically select-w
ed, since many of the men' from "R.
U. R." have been retained. Charles'I
Livingstone' will again assume theK
leading role, after having played suc-
cessfully in similar parts in earlier
productions. C. Lymhan Crane, promi-
nently cast in "R. U. R." and William
M. Lewis, Jr., leading lady of the
Union opera and "R. U. R." will play,
opposite Mr. Livingstone.

GRAHAJIS

At Both Ends of the Diagonal

S KLDREPAIRING

It is necessary that your
Fountain POP should function at all times:

TO INSURE THIS get a

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RIEv'sPeat Sho
3153SBate Street

W A

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE:
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

Night EIditor-E~LLIS B. MERRY'
NICE WORK
The Daily wishes to comned the
'tudent, ,if he was a% studenkt, w~~ho so
thoughtfully placed' the chemical in
the Arcade theater Friday night. At'
last, it seems,the student body has a
leader, who, though self appointed,
Joan unmistakably voice its sentiments.
His ingenuity' and 'courage in execut-
ing 'the design were remarkable. In
tacit, outside of' placing' the students
43in the wrong-light, making the settle-
2nent of the recent disturbances' more
iifficult, undermining the University's
plea for a lgreater appropriation, in-
terfering with a'-private business, and
causing° unnecessary discomfiture to
the theater patrons, his action was
mnost praiseworthy.

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THE MIL TAX I
In the earlier history of the Upiver-1,
'ity, the State 'legislature determined I
to enact, a. measure which would pro- ,
v~ide a permanent income for Univer-]
'sity needs. Accordingly a mill tax',
was passed specifically for University 3
;'maintenance fulids, based on the
'equalized tax pypluation of Michigan.j
,With the rise" in wealth of the State'
this sum' increased -yearly, but in 1921
It was found 'necessary to' increase the'
tax to six-tenths ,of a mill However,
,I 1923 a limit of $3,000,000 was placed
on the maintenance sum. In 1925 ris.
Ing costs mhad0 necessary an increase
of the limit to $3,700,000, which stands"
today. A meas~re to repeal thisw old~
law has been introduced into the lag-
islature by Senator Charles A. Sink,
'of Ann Arbor, andl is now in com-
anitteoe.
The measure ':passed in the earlier
gears of the University. was one which-II
)net University needs for maily years . I
'The policy was adopted by many
istates in the Middle West in provid-
Ing for University maintenaince. But:
rising costs of recent years have af-
'fected the University 'no less" thian
Individuals. The ;cost of bauding ma-
iterials and the like have been in-
'creased burdens. As Senator Sink of
Ann' Arbor recently stated,- each time
the University constructs 'a building;
it costs more1110 inaintain it. -The re-
peal of -the $3;?fQ,0O - imit on main-
tenance will be but al neeepap.y mets-
'tre to provi4,e'.fr,,ihe ,ever increa~sing
'expense of. tr widening, sphere of
Tul~nversity actiVt
LIF dill DEATH.

Following the' favorable reply of'
Great Britain, Japan has aessured 'a,
th'ree power conference at ;Geneva o~n
the' limitation of nav'al armament by'
her accep~tance of' the American pro-
posal. Tough the 'limiited represen-
tation at the meeting may preclude
an exhaustive and permanent agree-'
mient, it is expected that short' term'
limitation of auxiliary forces will be
seriously considered.
In her acceptance, Japan made the
potent suggestion that' France' and,
Italy again be asked to" participate inr
the five power conference originally
suggested. The attendance 'of France'
is particularly desired-since her sub-,
marine' strength is' a significant fac-
tor in the limitation of auxiliaries by,
lEngland, and'in the; attitude of itaily.
Though' it may, appear that thie
United States has neglected this point'
in' making its second suggestion, the'
,thr~ee power conference now assured
will serve as a convenient foun~dation
of a larger assembly. With this In I
mind, the' state department should!
continue the informal exchanges al-
ready reported to have been partially
successful in changing the views ' of
the French and' Italian governments."
IN HIS'"LINE
Gen: Smedley D. .Butler, devildo g,
sailed last week' from California 'to j
take commxand 'of' 3,000 marines who
will see service in revolution torn I
-China in protecting American prop-
erty, Genteral Butler probably' found'
the departure much to his liking. The
assignment' is ' in .his line. General
Buitler has been' a successful soldier,
but aS' a Philadelphia politician hie
was a glorious failure. Doubtless' he
.will again distinguish himself in;
China as he idid d Oring the Boxer
revrolution of X1899' when he received
commendation for bravery.t
.T,----

THE MAY FESTIVAL
The. thirty-fourth annual May Festi-
val, which will consist of six concerts,'I
will be held in Hill auditorium, MayI
18, 19, 20 and 21, and will assemble a
group of opera singers from theI
Metropolitan and Chicago Civic opera .
companies, concert and oratorio sing-
ers and concert instrumentalists. The
artists who have-been engaged con-
sist of the best in every field, and
probably represent the. most brilliant
assemblage ever to represent the
Festival. '
Madam Ernestine Schumann-Heink'
will be the star at the opening concert
Wednesday -night. Arrangements for
this concert have, been in progress for=
over a year, as this was the only
Festival engagement which the sing-
er could accept. Madam Schumann-
Heink is now in her fiftieth year as a"
public artist. Her numbers will be1a
supported by the Chicago Symphony
orchestra. X
Other noted cont~raltos who will ap-
pear are Sophie Braslau and Elsie
Baker. The former, for many years
a star at ,the Meropolitan Opera'
House, will sing the :title role in~
"Carmen" on Saturday night. The
latter will sing Beethoven's "Mass in
D," commemorating the centennial',of
that noted composer, on Thursday
night. Elsie Baker has" received her
entire musical education in this coun-
try and 'is remembered as oratorio
artist.
The two tenors who will appear at
the festival are Armand Tokatyan, of'
the Metropolitan company, whose 'ca-
reer has been a recent sensation of'
musical circles, and Arthur Hackett,
American concert and oratorio singer.;
Hackett has returned t ' this country!
after an absence of several years. He1
'has sung in Ann Arbor on many other!
occasions.
Lawrence Tibbett, leading baritone,,
became' famous almost over night
through his rendering of ,the role ,
of "Ford" ini Verdi's "Falstaff" three
seasons ago.. He appeared in this citys
two years ago. He will sing the role 'l
of.,"Escamillo" in "Carmen" on Satur-
day night.'
Under the 'instrumental head will bel
:Lea Luboshiitz and Ernest Hutcheson.
Luboshutz '-is a' Russian violiust who
was born in Odessa, and came to
Amnerica a ':wlhile ago for a visit ofl
three' weelks, after which she wasl
I obliged to return to Europe for a con-
cert series. Hutcheson is an Amer-,
ican pianist who will appear on Sat-
urday afternoon.
IThere. are many others, and the en-
tire -list is made up of those who are,
outstanding in their field, and have
been chosen for specific parts in the,
Festival.
The musical version of "Upstairs
and Down" will probably be called

The wise motorist watches
the lubrication of his car as
carefully as the anxious mother
looks after the diet of her
children.
Different maikes of cars re-
quire different grades of oil.
We carry a varied line of oils
that will meet your every re-
pulrement.
MICNIGAMME"
.Oil CGIMPANY }

jt ::

Printing, itnorauing
- _11

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Thr isa iaf.laat n~o
art abu aae'. ~ae
- I form al, vryheeisyiedlies
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by JakSotadhi ovrns
cThereaniscan ar or ar ithinform-
es enomn-fadacadJc
anityaot Granger's acaodemyulthatue
tie. Dnigcatngwt fins
.a
Graa
- _
"whoe tN ditsayed iaothti \
TUTTE'S.LUNC
. g dhas e,urdiny -uraN igh..

if

'1

PARTY PROGRAMS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
INVITATIONS"
STATIONERY.
FOLDERS
NEWSLETTERS ?.r
PLACARDS
BUSINESS CARDS
CALLING CARDS
ETC.. ETC.

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l+
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THE REAL INSIDE M~OPE ON
CAMPUS INSTITUTIONS

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THE 'ENAN
This magazine, is really named the'
Michiganensian,' but is more common-"
ly known as the "'Ensian." The apos- j
troplhe, as perhaps your teacher once'
told you, stands for lack of something.
That's why it is so appropriate in the
title" of this book.
* * *,
Th~e only people that ever buy the
'Ensian are those' who _think their
pictures are going' to appear in it.
If they ,don't appear, they sell' ;.he,
book to somebody whose namve does
appear.
* * s
ThWs year's annual is supposed to be,
a historical number. To collect mna-
terial, the -staff, including the manag-
ing editor, has been looking through
the gold copies of, the book for the
past three months., They didn't find
anything- in any of the issues. that was
worth puiblishig.
s s*
[No' self-respecting journalist would
Iwork on a publication that took a
Iwhole year to get out one issue.

lot, r0 tu t Ivn
245 S. Main St. (o~f Liberty)
Phdne -32314
For Service and Qguu.ity. None Better

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Rta# Ta IEWAT ADS

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CAMPIUS' OPINION
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. TIhe names ot coihmuni-
-cants muist be published with every
communicetion

..

, tE DD f'HS BIT
To The Editor:
If tko0 ze) ti-Man or lady' who dis-
carded thes olfactory "offering genially-
described in, the press this rn ing

A

SUND AY BREAKFAST

9:00 to 11f:00

I

- .Fruits. ~

Calf ee

Toas t

- Cereals

Wheat Cakes' - Maple Syrup
Roast Chicken Dinner,

75e

as ,a ."stink bomb," in one. of the thea-
ters yesterday was a student, he or1
she has done his, or her bit towards
making _sttlernent of, existing differ-

DOES the Junior
so strong for ."local,

Girls' Play go in
color" that it will

11t:30--2:00
Soup - -Chicken - Vegetable - Dessert- Drink

i;

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