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March 12, 1927 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SATUIRDAY, MARCI 12, 1927

THE MICHIGAN DAILY "

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MRS. . 0IiENDERSOCiticizes Philosophy
ELLS F TOf Noted Dramatist
IN LEAGUE INTERESTS'I,

MEETS WITh ENCOURAGEMENT
AND ENTHUSIASM IN TEXAS
AND OKLAHOMA
FINDS MANY INTERESTED
Exocutive Secretary Visits Sothwest
Part Of Country To Work With
Mieoigan Graduates
In the interest of the Women's'
League, Mrs. W. D. Henderson, exe-~
cutive secretary of the Alumnae coun-
cil, recently completed a trip through-
nut the southwestern part of the Unit-
ed States, and states she was met
encouragingly and enthusiastically by
different groups of former Michigan
men and women who have been work-
ing with increasing loyalty towards
the attainment of the new building.
Kansas City, Missouri, Oklahoma
City, Tulsa and Pawhuska, Oklahoma
were the four main cities visited by
Mrs. Henderson during this trip, each
one of which maintain an active alum-
nae organization.
Under the leadership of Miss Mar-
jorie Davis the Kansas City group an-
ticipates completing the $10,000 pledge
it has made, and Miss Davis expects
to bring the amount with her when
she makes a visit to Ann Arbor during
spring vacation. If this is accomplish-
ed Kansas City will be allotted a par-
ticular room in the new League build-
ing, which will be known as the
"Ceorgia Robertson Baird Room," in
memory of the late Mrs. Charles
Baird, for which Mr. Baird has given
$5,000. Mrs. Baird was keenly interest-
ed in League work, and was one of
the first to give a gift of size, at the
time of the early inception of the
league she doated $550. Mr. and Mrs.
Baird lived in Ann Arbor during the
time of Mr. Baird's connection withf
athletic work in the University.
Previous to this time Oklahoma City
had done no work for the league, butI
through the efforts of Mrs. Henderson
and Mrs. Ald~rich Blake (Mary Clark-t
son of Ann Arbor) a group met at the
home of Mrs. George Chase Lewis'
and discussed 'League work as well'
as developments of the University in
general. Among those present at the
meeting were Judge George Cottrel,
of the Federal Bench of the Federat
Court, and Mrs. Anton Classon, widow
of Anton Classon, '88 Law, who was
one of the first to go over the border
when Oklahona was opened for set-
tlement..Mrs Classon had given lib-
erally to the University of Oklahoma
but nevertheless sent a gift to the
League.
Tulsa, Oklahoma has a very active
alumnae organization, particularly
among the women. Miss Constance
Eirich is chairman of the women's
work, and through the fine co-opera-
tion given her is determined to make
Tulsa 100 per cent in League member-
ships. Miss Eirich holds one of the
most important women's positions in
the state of Oklahoma, that of ge -
ologist for the Gypsy Oil Company.
Other Michigan women hold some of'
the most important teaching positions
in the Tulsa public schools. Mrs.
Charles Lahman, who is keenly inter-
ested in League work, is noted
throughout Oklahoma for her study
of unnamed plants. While at Mich-
igan, Mrs. Lahman did special work'
in the biology department.I
Pawhuska, Oklahoma, the city of
the Osage region, is the home of Mr.
George Labodie, the only Osage In-
dian ever graduated from Michigan.
and Mrs. Henderson found it very
responsive to League work. Mr. La-
bodie gave a gift of $1,000.

TO BEGIN PLAY SCORE
SALE ONV(EDNESDAYj
Music scores for "Eight Till Eight",
1928 Junior Girls' play, have been dis-
tributed among all the campus book-
stores and will go on sale next Wed-
nesday. They will be priced at $1.50.-
Most of the selections are of the pop-
ular dance type with occasional de-
partures into waltz movements. Mar-
l garet Cole, chairman of the music
committee has written a number of
musical selections and lyrics, whilel
Marion Karboskey, Louise Piggott,
and Grace Glover are responsible forl
the rest of the music and Sarah Bo-
nine and Marion Karbosky for lyrics.
{Phyllis Loughton, director of the
play, predicts that "Eight T;1 Eight",!
"Hello ", 'Turning the Tables" and
3 "Blucstockings" will be the musical!
hits of the play. Scores will also be'
sold between acts during all perfor-
mances at the Whitney.
Margaret Hawkins, chairman of
programs, reports a successful drive
for advertising. Detroit and other out-
of-town merchants and business men
as well as those in Ann Arbor. were
very generous in buying pages in the
program, with the result that the ad-
vertising space was oversold.
Sorority Wins Over
League House Zone;
In a comparatively easy, but well
played game, Kappa Delta defeated
Zone 3, yesterday afternoon, by a
score of 63 to 14, in the final series
of the intramural tournament. The
Kappa Delta players showed excellent
team work, and outplayed the oppos-
ing team throughout the entire game.
Though the forwards of the zone team
played a very good game, the ball was
seldom in their territory. The line
up of.the teams is as follows:
k appa D~elta Zone 3
M. MacNally.....F.......... J. Davis
E. Ogborn........F.... E. Middlewood
J. Jones ........C........J'. Folsom
N. Hoover.......S. C..... G. Lightfoot
E. Parker ......C.G.........M. DeLine
M Davidson ... .....M. Cranford
ed by flames. The fire spread through
the four story brick building and burst
through the room within halt an hour
of its discovery.

W.A.A. Board Selects STUDENT TOUR TO COVER I
Convention Delegate VARIED EUROPEAN POINTS
For the first time in the history'
At a meeting of the W. A. A. boardI of the University of Denver, or any
last Tuesday evening, Gladys Appelt, other Rocky Mountain college, an of-
'28, was elected the oflcial delegate ficial student tour of Europe will be
from the Michigan Women's Athletic made under the auspices of the uni-
association, to attend the Athletic versity. The tour will last two months,l
Conference of American College Wo- beginning June 18 and will be limited
men, which will be held at Cornell to 15 members, who may be either
University, Ithaca, N. Y. from April men or women.
21, to April 23, inclusive. One of the great advantages of the
'Women's Athletic associations, from tour, according to Miss Anne Shuler,
nearly every large university all over dean of women of the University of
the country will be represented at Denver, who is sponsoring the trip, is
this conference. The work of the var- that so many places of beauty and his-
ious associations will be discussed, toric significance will be visited, that
and the constitutions and point sys- are ordinarily overlooked. Included in
tems of the different colleges will be the route of the tour are: Lake Ge-
compared. Plans will be made and neva, the Rhine, Milan, Venice, Flor-
ideas exchanged about any women's ence, Rome, Naples, Mt. Vesuvius,
athletic problems that may arise. Capri, Nice, Monte Carlo, and Brus-
*It is expected that several other sels. In addition the party will spend
women will go from the W. A. A. here, ten (lays in Paris.I
and also some members of the facul- Commenting on the tour, Miss Shu-
aty of the nhvsical education school. ler says, "It is a wonderful help and
It is hoped that the A. C. A. C. W. investment in a student's life . . . It
may be held at the University of Mich- recalls every college course taken."
igan next year, at which time the new The tour will cost only $1,000. This
field house for women will be com- sum includes first class cabins on the
pleted. steamships.

According to a statement issued by
Mrs. W. D. Henderson executive sec-
retary of the Alumnae council of the
Women's league pledges have been
coming in well. A gift of $1,000 was
received recently from Mrs. W. W.
Mitchell of Cadillac, sister of Mr. and

fl

Mrs. Walter H. Sawyer, wife of Reg-
ent Sawyer of Hillsdale.
A short but important meeting of
the board of directors of the Women's
league will be held at 9 o'clock in
room 110 of the Library.

Ai.

"Oh Kay" Bloomers
These bloomers are named for
Gertrude Lawrence's show
"Oh Kay." They are of
flesh crepe de chine with long
silk fringe, as illustrated,
$5.95.

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(Second Floor)

Diiss Miriam Stephenson
As a thesis requirement for one of
her courses in the Laurence college,
Appleton, Wis., Miriam Stephenson
wrote a criticism of George Bernard
Shaw's philospohy of life. Thinking
he might be interested in she mailed a
copy to his London address and re-
ceived the following reply:
"You are quite an ingenius young
liar. How many marks did they give
you? A career as a journalist is in-
dicated. Good luck to you." Miss
Stephenson called Shaw a Mephisto-
phelian personality, and in her critic-
ism inferred that in his philosophy of
life he ran always contrary to accept-
ed standards.
WELLESLEY STUDENTS
DEFY FIREAND SMOKE
Wellesley women defied fire and l
smoke last Monday in order to rescue
botanical collections valued at $200,-
000. Stone hall, a botanical labora-
tory building, caught fire, and the
students far from being frightened by I
the smoke, saved much of the ap-I
paratus and valuable botanical speci-
mens before the building was destroy-

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Spring Styles
for
1927
Here Is One of the Many

. -.

RON AN (CE

One Buckele
Parchment
Color
$10

OUR SPECIAL BRICK
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"TheHomeof Pre 7ilk

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Watr
10S Soutli Main St.

s Shoe Store

D~ownmt own

Phone 3315

Goodness!
Are llmvays Deliciously Fresh

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Seventy

Cents

THE POUND
a4t GO ODYEAS.R'S
124 South Thilm St.

eYlectric Toast
There is a quality about
toast made by electricity-
a flavor, a relish, a satis-
faction-that distinguishes
it from ordinary toast. One
who has not tasted the de-
licious product of the Elec-
tric Toaster does not know
toast at its best.
During the Month of March
(only) electric toasters are offered
at special, reduced prices. This
opportunity is worth taking.

TELEPHONE

MICHIGAN BELL

A Carload of Canned Good's
Sold Daily by Long. Distance
Co.
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'P.~vRraj 1 ,J Popt _5'a
w~vark +' " 'N fK O O9 vs
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FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101-105 S. MAIN STREET 330 S. STATE STREET

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Long Distance builds sales
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