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March 12, 1927 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1927-03-12

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PAGE FOUR.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

sATURDAY, MArCH 12, 1927

Published evey morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board m
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the usefor republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this papertand the local newspub-
lished therein.

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Entered at the postoffic. at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
card Street.'
Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4926i
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor................W.Calvin Patterson
City Editor........ ........Irwin A. Olian
News Editors......... Frederick Shillito
Neve Edtor.........." jPhilip C. Brooks
Women's Editor...............Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor...........Morris Zwerd ing
Music and Drama...,.....Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behyme Ellis Merry
Carlton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
o Chamberlin Courtand C. Smith
aes Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl 'Burger Ilenry Thurnau
Joseph Brunswick
Reporters

a,

OXrn Ardor-
Margaret Arthyr
jean CAfpbelt
Jessie Churchak
Chester k,. Clark
Margaret Clarke
Blanchard W. Cleland
William Emery
Alfred Lei Foster
Robert E. Finch
Robert Gesaner
Margaret Gross
iLiaie Grube p---,
Coleman tencer
Hjarvey .Gudersofl
Stwart iove
Morton B. Icove'

Pail Kern
Milton Kirshbaum.
Sally Knox
Richard Kurvink.
G. Thomas McKean
Kenneth Patrick
Mary Ptolemy
jknis QuiiO.
James Sheehan
Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Sylvia Stone
Mary Louise Taylor
William Thurnau
Milford Vanik
Herbert E.kVedder
Mvarian Welles
Thaddeus Wasielewski
Sherwood Winslow

BUSINESS STAFF
telephone 1214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Advertising...............William C. Pusch
Advertising...............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising............George H. Annable, Jr.
Advertising............Laurence 3. Van Tuyl
Circulation.. ., .......".T. Kenneth Haven
Publication.. .. ......John H. Bobrink
Accounts... ...........Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
George Ahn Jr. Esther Booze
D. M. Brown Hilda Binzer
Florence Cooper Marion A. Daniel
A. M. Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
E. L. Hulse Selma M. Jansen
R. A: Meyer Marion Kerr
William F. Spendr Marion L. Reading
Harvey Talcott Harriet C. Smith
Harold Utley Nance Solomon
Ray Wachter Florence Widmaier
J. B. Wood
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1927
Night Editor-STANFORD N. PHELPS

are now functioning in the stricken
areas. The Cabinet has passed spe-
cial measures for general relief. The
Japanese are carrying on, rebuilding
and building for the future.
PoTs
Every year in the springwhen the
season seems to call for greater per-
sonal freedom, a considerable number
of freshmen labor under the delusion
that the "pots" need be worn no long-
er and that the traditional head cov-
ering may be easily dispensed with or
forgotten when not under the eye
of the vigilantes.
It seems painfully unnecessary to
point out that the "pots" should be
worn until Cap Night when they can
be discarded with due ceremony into
the traditional bonfire when the bar-
rage of speeches has lifted. Lately
the "pots" have been conspicuous for
their absence, tritely speaking, and
the Student council might well look
into the matter.
THE CLARION
In the, merchandising convention
now being held at Detroit the advan-
tage of advertising in the settlement
of credit problems and credit com-
petition was stressed at great length
and sensible advertising was proposed
1 as the cure for credit ills that now
4re attacking big business.
Advertising has come to take its
place in tle world of business and
each day it is coming more and more
to be accepted as a profession and to
raise its standards to the standards
of professional activity. Gone are the
days when advertising was the "bally-
hoo" of big business, when it was
merely the "catch-all" of trad~e and
was successful in relation to its abil-
ity to make a huge profit by the use of
high pressure methods. Now it is the
means of building reputation and con-
fidence in its integrity. Companies
stand behind every statement and
make every statement stand behind
them. Advertising is the co-partner
of big business, it is the link between
the manufacturer and the market. As
such, its words are of importance and
it has much to say on the settlement
of pioblems. It is an integral part
of trade.
UNIFIED FARM SAiLES
Robert F. Wagner, United States
senator from New York, believes that
there should be instituted some agency
for the purpose of unifying the buy-
ing and selling of the farmer. He
believes that the agency should be
strong enough financially to preclude
any necessity of selling at a sacrifice.
Last of all, he states that the profits
of the so-called middleman should be
cut down, and transportation cheapen-
ed by unification. On the whole,
Senator Wagner is in favor of a strong
monopoly of the food stuffs of the
country.
In the first place the formation of
such a combination would be a direct
antithisis of the spirit of the Anti-
Trust law if it could evade its letter.
If the agency were strong enough to
withhold supply until a rise in price,
the change in price level would ma-
terially change the natural workings
of the business cycle, for the worse.
As for the statement in favor of cut-
ting down the profits of the middle-
man, this actually sounds silly. If the
profits were cut down, the middle-
men would drop out of the business
and all the risk would immediately
fall upon the farmer. When this hap-
pens we may all expect a great de-

crease in our farm production, for if
the farmer had to assume the risk for
his crop he could not afford to grow
it. In the case of transportation
costs, they can not be very excessive
or the railroads would make more
money. If Senator Wagner suggests
an agency in place of the middle-
men, his point is not clear. It is like
substituting a hat pin for a plain pin
in order to prick a balloon.

TOASTED ROLL
CARTA
The University's Magna Carta was
issued yesterday. It admits that
"theater owners should realize that a
University town is not the same as
other types of cities." We agree.
Other towns are roligher and more

disorderly.
* * *
It is this document that ushers in,
the beginning of a new era. No longer
will there be riots and rushes. No1
longer will some students go to the;
hospital and others to, the jail. Therej
will be peace and calm. IF......and
there it comes, again, that "IF." If,
Butterfield swings wide the gates to;
celebrate big victories WITH his
customers, instead of AGAINST them.
* * *
One section of the Magna Carta asks
that students be more orderly in gain-
ing entrance to the second shows:
"the 8:40 rush." But the joke is that
the rushes are no more! The entrance
to the Maj. Thursday night at 8:40
looked like the crowd that would
gather for a philosophy lecture if
roll weren't going to be taken. By
the time any resolution gets published
around here it is a month out of date.
* * *
President Little favors free shows
for students when big victories are
being celebrated. If lie brings them
-about, we hope lie gets a chance to get
in himself. We'll see that they save
you a seat in the front row at the
first free show, Prexy.
* * *
Come to think about it, we can't re-
member seeing the President at the

Music and Drama
TONI(RhIT: The Nimes present
haret Capek's uniique 11elodramaIl "1..
UI. It" in the 3inmes theater for the
last time at s:30 o'clock.
"IA tE VOUI AONE 'E ON IG lIT, Kli i"
After all, the most important part
of a show is the book. It is true that
in musical comedy there need ever
be a well tempered juxtaposition of
song-and-dance with the humor and
romance of the book, but without the
latter element it would be impossible
to ever create a success in dollars
and cents.
This year "Eight 'till Eight," the
twenty-third annual Junior Girls'
play, which will be given in the Whit-
ney theater from Tuesday night
through Saturday with a Saturday
matinee has the unique privilege to

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE

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makes ladies
prefer,
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-=G R AHJ.yAAFsTS =
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Saturday Special. -
LOOSE LEAF NOTE BOOK WITH PAPER
i ~GRAHAATS
At Both Ends of the Diagonal -
.-tlIliIIIITlIItII1ll1IlI1itlli ~______________________________________ ______________________________ _______ _______

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Candy or Tobacco
It is very convenient at times to be able to run in
to our store between classes or on your way to or
from the campus and find candy, tobacco, maga-
zines, and many other things which you may have
occasion to want.
RALPH'S

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READ THE WANT ADS

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A FAIR STATEMENT
The statement issued on theaterl
rushes by President Clarence Cook
Little, Joseph A. Bursley, dean of stu-
dents, and three police commissioners
gives a fair and complete summary of
the conditions concerning the disturb-
ance of Monday night, as well as of pre-
vious ones, and makes helpful sug-
gestions toward bettering relations
between the' students and the local
theaters.
After reviewing the duties and at-
titudes which should be observed by
the police and the students, its authors
endorse the idea of "free" shows folb
lowing important athletic victories as
a policy "to the advantage of all con-
cerned." It is also wisely suggested
that "while negotiations are being
carried on and after they have been
completed, the students will be ex-
pected to act in a reasonable and law
abiding manner." Any conduct con-
trary to this spirit, or detrimental to
the rights and interests of the thea-
ters will distinctly hamper the efforts
of the commniittee now seeking to set-
tle the difficulties.
Likewise, attention is called to the
inexcusable crowding and jostling by
which students attempt to enter the
theaters at general performances. The
formation of a double line is advocated
as a substitute of "a pushing mob
blocking all sidewalk traffic at the en-
trance of the theater." There is no
reason why students should not co-
operate in this respect. Their more
orderly action would indicate a better
spirit and would be a safeguard against
injuries now attendant to the pressure
of the mob.
JAPAN\ESE EARTHQUAKES
The rapidly .rising death list due
to the recent earthquake which shook
the Mineyama district and others of
Japan. brings home again the tre-.
mendou danger to life and property
under' which. many Japanese live.
Hardly a year goes by without some
major disaster of this sort, necessitat-
ing the rebuilding of homes, commer-
cial establishments, and the expondi-
ture of vast sums for relief purposes.
And were it not for the courageous
character of the ruined Japanese in
the devasted districts the effects of
the earthquakes would be far greater'
than it usually is.
Each time the Japanese rebuild,

local theaters. Maybe he would fig- I
ure they were worth going to if he
got a pass.
DON'T ABOLISH STUDENTS j
Dear Tim-You're all wrong when
you suggest abolishing students in 1
order to stop these riots. It wouldn't
help any, because what about the col- }-Photo by Dey
lege boys? I'lierMerrick '
j nl. - Aiitho r of " Eight 'fill Eight"
* *
possess the most original book in the
DOWN THE DIAGONAL history of the production. And this is
not mere windy publicity, concocted
"That "resolution," remarked to snare the gullible, but the genuine
the Jolly Junior yesterday, concensus of opinion of Professor
"blames the students in para- Campbell, Don Haines and other of
graph one, the police in the sec- the patrons saints of local dramatics.
ond, and the theaters later on, This year Esther Merrick, the author,
Can't they drag in prohibition has accomplished something never be-
somehow?" fore attempted--=she has created a
character in Daisy, the Eternal Dum-
bell, who will probably last into the
RIOTING WIL1 BECOME AN tradition of such things. The group
TINTRAMURAL S E ANRT, RU of surrounding characters are almost f
N A AT, Ras well done-distinct creations, con-
Dear Hay-Considerable comment vincing in their reality and not lack-
has been occasioned in local sport-
ing circles by the persistent rumor ing in humor.
that rioting is soon to be numbered Tetworksinto origsteleltyes
among the intramural sports. Because of interest, but in a more stereotyped
mway, for after all there are certain
of wild talk among checker champions conventions in musical comedy that
and bridge bouters it seems best to can't be avoided. Still with a group
give some general publicity to the of juveniles, and Daisy, who manages
matter. to involve the studio club into all
It is thought that numerals will be monvolve thmpstudionslthereare a
manner of complications thereara
awarded as in tennis, etc., but that series of original situations that are
gas-masks rather than sweaters will most -ntertaiinig. For instance,
be given star rioters. It is held that when Daisy in search of dialogue for
student rioters may engage in tour- her "realistic novel" decides to ac-
naments with the local police without cost some gentleman on the street,
losing their amateur standing, since and invertently makes an evening
the police do not rank as profession- engagement with the Lone Kid, as
als.
ean. Zwell as in a dozen other moments
Dean Zilch will be recalled as '"Coi- that are both clever and humorous-
missioner of Riots" if the proposal humorous, that is in a subtle way,
goes through. and not in the manner of broad slap- I
Cligulc.istick that has hitherto seemed neces-
sary. "Eight 'till Eight" should be
They n't professional singularly blessed with intelligence
sport,anyway. Students don't get when all is considered. There are
paid, and neither do the police, if enough musical numbers of exception-!
they get what they're worth. al value, dancing of extraordinary
S* * quality combined with sufficient ro-
ASK POLICE PROTECTION mantic nonsense to make it into moreI
The Junior Girls' Play committee than the ordinary Junior Girls' Play.
has demanded police protection-in-**,

Varsity Laundry Agency

Williams Street

Across from Congregational Church

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FOUR DAYS
May 18, 19, 2-0,21
1927

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tel.IwIJY1l.IIJ~.d.// 0.0r. I

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SIX CONCE RTS
HILL AUDITORIUM - ANN ARBOR
EARL V. MOORE Musical Director
FREDERICK STOCK Orchestral Cond.
JOSEPH E. MADDY Children's Cond.
Rosa Ponselle Soprano
Metropolitan Opera Company
Betsy Lane Shepherd Soprano
American concert and oratorio singer
Lois Johnston Soprano
San Carlo Opera Company
Ernestine Schumann-Heink Contralto
Jubilee Anniversary
Sophie Braslau Contralto
Metropolitan Opera Company
Elsie Baker Contralto
American concert and oratorio singer
Armand Tokatyan Tenor
Metropolitan Opera Company
Arthur Hackett - Tenor
American concert and oratorio singer
Lawrence Tibbett Baritone
Metropolitan Opera Company
William Simmons Baritone
American concert' and oratorio singer
James Wolfe Bass
Metropolitan Opera Company
Lea Luboshutz Violinist
Russian Violinist
Ernest Hutcheson Pianist
Eminent American Artist
CARMEN Bizet
MASS IN D Beethoven
(Beethoven centenary)
CHORAL SYMPHONY Holst
IA _ x

CAMPUS OPINOIN
Annonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants must be published with every
communiiicatio n

cludingt
office. T
Hill audit
on the si
there ar
box office
CONE

SOMETHING TO WRITE ABOUT AN AD
To The Editor: elusion a
J have noticed with amusement that fore eigh
several "Necessarily Anonymous Per- body goin
sons" have been at a loss for topics any chant
to write upon since the recent auto- gentlema
matic censorship was established.
However, because a "Campus Com- J--OP
ment" column may serve a useful pdr- price, ac
pose at some time I hope the students the comm
will keep their column alive by con- taken on
tributing harmless items to it. ' members
A guessing contest as to the future the comm
name of the new stadium would call
for some little ingenuity, perhaps, and "THE
would not prevent the addition of the have six
writer's signature. I am willing to and only

the tear gas-for its box
the line-up of customers at
torium has threatened to take
ze of a riot several times. If
e townspeople rushing that
e, we may tear-gas 'em.
* * *
TINUED IN WANT AIDS
for a "found" article in con-
sks that you "do not call be-
t in the morning." Is any-
ng to be up at five or six by
ce tomorrow who can call the
Ln?
* * *
FAVORS are going up in
cording to the chairman of
mittee. No action has been
the proposal that committee
turn over their favors to
.on customers.
* *a *

it. U. R,,
A review, by )Ialverua Kennedy.
Practically everything haG been
said about this show, that can be. But
it seemed to take the campus a week
to find out that the critics were really
right in their praise. At the present
it could last into next week if "Eight
'till Eight" didn't interfere.
And "R. U. R." really is exceptional
entertainment. As a drama it is of
the best, and contains a pleasant con-
tradiction of satire and melodrama.
The only thing that might be criticized
here is the epilogue which doesn't
seem to belong. After all it is-an an-
tique and obsolete device, and seems
hardly necessary.
The acting and direction contrib-
ute most to the success. Charles
Livingstone is easily the best juvenile
the campus has seen in years, and
Robert Wetzel the best in character
work. Both were efficient last night,

11

MICHIGANENSIAN"

will

junior positions
five sophomores

next year,
are trying

'----- ______ar___. __ s...z__ ..aee _e

II 11

11 II

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