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January 25, 1927 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1927-01-25

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MAE FOtMl

THEI MICH-IGfAN DAILYV

TUSDYJN 17A VY I5f)92

' a aas .- a-aa as

-..,Ra.... H..., .. a .

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of StudentyPublications. B r
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dlcaria rritl t it o ntoherws

P
i
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credited in this aer an the loanes p
lished therein. -l
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,I
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-J
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; b'usiness 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR1
SMITH H. CADY, JR,
Editor............... Calvin Patter, -i
City Editor........ ... .Irwin A. Oliaa
ews Ed ...rs.... . Frederick Sbhii ii
News Editors............Philip C. lrooks
Women's Editor..............Marion Kubik
Sports Editor........... Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Edit-or...........Mo ris Zxerd ho
Music and Drama...... .Vincent C Wal. Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behynet Ellis Meiry
Carlton Champe Stanford "hc
o Chaberin Courtland C
auies Herald cssam A\ G br15
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnau1
Joseph BrunswickE
ReportersI
Marion Anderson Miles Kimball
Alex Bochnowski Mdtol kir-lhbo ism
Jean Campbell Ric'ard Kurvink.
Chester E. Clark G. Thomas McKean
Clarence Edelson Kenneth Patrick
Earl W. De La Vergne)Morris Quinn
William Emerv James Sheehan
Alfred Le Foster Nelson J, Smith, Jr.
Robert E. Finch Sylvia Stone
Robert Gessner William Thurnzm
Elaine Gruber Milford Vanik
Coleman 3. Glencer Herbert E. Vedd-r
Harvey J.Gunderson Marian Welles
Stewart Hlooker Thaddeu s wasielew
Morton 1. Icove Sherwood Winslo'
Paul Kern

National Student Federation of Amer- 3,205- - - -.lt ll.1199GI t ii l!E{[Iit11911111.91110 IiI III II llI.II HfI I I I I l
ica held in Ann Arbor last month, the If the people of Texas remember
council, with its 12 members, and their governor, "Ma" Ferguson, for 4 U S I C
president, can handle it. nothing else, it is safe to say that they
There is no need for the college will not soon forget her one distinc-DA.
councils, at present, anyway. It tion; that of granting pardons. U bD R A M A
would be pure folly to give them a to Wednesday night preceding her ex- a
permanent organiation, and worse to, piration of office, Governor Ferguson ~ ~ ~ ~
offer more elective offices to students, increased her total of clemincy acts to TlE riMES
which entail nothing more than the 3,205, which is undisputed as an all- The most prtentios list of plays For Your Convenience-Two'toresCOM letely1tocked
so-called honor involved, time all-American record for any gov--ever to be incorporated hinW a local
* ernor. Upon t'his Wednesday in ques- season have been announced by Minmie
THE~ POLITICAL FOOTBALL jltion, she issued 27 pardons. The day for their program during the remaind-G
before, she granted 32. er of the year. It has been a tradi-
President Coolidge, who has neve Law enforcement in Texas has re- tion that each of the dramatic socie At Both Ends of the Diigo
been defeated in an election and who ceived a serious setback during the ties present at a maximum
has weathered more than one govern- two years that "Ma" has been gover- plays-or rather, three performanes, ___11111______________Iff__li__II__li__IiIIII_111l1111 111111111i -
mental storm, will have a new prob- nor. It is hard enough to convict since Comedy Club has presented KE
1em on his hands if the Mexican is- criminals with our present inefficient several series of one act plays. In
sue becomes, any more than it has, court systems, but to have a governor fact, in the past patronage could hard-
the political football of rival Protes- ranting wholesale pardons to those ly have supported more. At the pres-
tant and Catholic chuches. The f w who do receive scnten-es, makes ent, however, with dramatic enthusi-
the whole procedure farcial. asm at its heighth, the Mimies have to make sure that your
a firm administration policy due to In fact, two counties in Texas had announced four plays, a revue and a
the anti-clerical measures of the Cal- suspended all trails of criminal cases vaudeville tournament to be presented
th niceia esrso h a-next semester e is ready for Exams. We will
les government while the Protestants until after Governor Ferguson re-
have no less earnestly spoken for tired from office on January iS. The The first play, "The Man of Desti-
ha~ nols ansl soe ,carge you nothing for lookng it over, or better yet, buy a
arbitration. prosecutors felt that all their hard ny, by Bernard Shaw, is now in re-
For the present the administration work went for naught when "Mahearsal. The fertile and futile sar-
pardoned men whom they had cent casm of Shaw has always been popu-
seems to agree with the Protestants. Ni
Yet many of the Catholics feel that'to prison. lar, and the most successful dramas to u-
the administration's position in the Certainly, criminals will not have to be given locally have been from his
more respect for the law when pros- theater. "The Man o Destiny," fol-
n ndbpects of being pardoned after being lowing the trend of the immensely sc-The pen that won't balk or run dry in the middle of an exam.
considerably weakened due to the pcso en adndatrbigjlwn h rn fteimneyse
tacit acceptance of arbitration in rin convicted, are so bright. The only cessful "Great Catherine" is Shaian Holds enough ink for ten exams. Six to twelve times as much
fear which they recognize is the cer- perversion of history to the extent ink as other pens
ciple. The Catholics have not been anyobegpnshan sf- that Napoleon is made the object of
identified with the move toward arbi- tainty of being punished, and soft
hearted governors are doing much to his own egotistical ridicule.
tration. dispel even this fear. "R. U. R." by Karel Capek (the
Aside from the religious elements rTheatre Guild sucess of three seasons
now bound up in the dispute, the 1past) is also partially cast. It was
possibility of the country going to war CAMPUS OPINION cosere at ie time to be the most 315 State Street
against Mexico is exceedingly remote. Anonymous communications will be original development of the year and
isregarded. The names of communi-
Of the 147 oil companies doing busi- c.nt will however, be regarded as as an imaginative melodrama has
ness in Mexico all but 22 are reported c e un - proved popular in the Little Theaters REAL SERVICE
to have accepted the new petroleum of the country. The play's chief pow--~ ~~ ~
law, and no decision will be rendered ,J ~ 1LI1er is the intense and incvitale ma h- RAEE
on the constitutionality of the law To The Editor: inations of Rossum's Universal Robots. L R A
until a case is given to the courts. The In the issue of January 21 of The The creation of a force beyond huanVI TiodaIyv und Tomltorrow
administration's position can hardly Daily one phrase of the editorial, "A control in the mechanical men whO i(This Ad. with f110c ill
be said to be weakened by an indicated, Change," especially puzzled me have been created in bring about and d You) pjj Vj1pfi
Chage esecall pzzld e
willingness to settle a dispute of such industrial millenium provides a plot II 1. L RRii '0. A)

1

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Advertising...............William C. Pusch
Advertising..............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising...... ....,George Fl. Anna :le, Jr.
kdvertsing...........Laurence J. Van 'uyl
Circulation...............T. Kenneth Haven
Publication..............r..John 11. Bobrinkc
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
George Ahn Jr, Ray Wachter
Melvin H. Baer J. B. Wood
D. M. Brow r Esther Booze
Florence Cooper Hilda Binzer
Daniel Finley Mrrion A. Daniel
A. M. Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
E. L. Hulse Selma M. Janson
R. A. Meyer Marion Kerr
Harvey Rosenblum Marion L. Reading
William F. Spencer Harriet C. Smith
Harvey Talcott Nance Solomon
Harold Utley Florence Widmaier

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diminishing proportions by arbitra-
tion.

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TIE MONKEY WRENCH
Opposing ratification of the Lau-
sanne treaty providing for the re-
sumption of diplomatic relations be-
tween the United States and Turkey,
on the grounds that it failed to pro-
vide for the Wilson award to Armenia,
guarantees for protection to Amer-
icans and non-Moslems in Turkey, and
recognition by Turkey of the American
nationality of its former subjects, the
Senate has again delayed the admin-
istration's efforts to resume normal
commercial and diplomatic intercourse
with that country.
Although the treaty negotiated in
1923 at the Lausanne conference has
flaws, it is held to be the best which
could be negotiated at that time and
probably remains so. The Senate de-
cision, too, was influenced by a re-

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Japan has become almost broaamin-
of unique features and gripping pro-
ed in the recen1t trouble in China and gression.
has adopted a policy almost as ; "Hell Bent Fer Heaven" by Hatcher
straightforward as those of the other Hughes, the Pulitzer prize play for
nations." There is a joke in the 1923, is the third vehicle. The child-
statement somewhere (maybe two ish passion and pathological expres-
jokes). "Straightforward!" Shame sion of the fanatic religiosity of the
on us for our smug compacency and native mountaineers is one of the most

sure reliance on the rightness

of intelligent treatments of the setting

TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1927
Night Editor-JO H. CHAMBERLIN
COLI EGE COUNCILS
As the result of agitation for wider
student government on the campus,
the Student Council, at the spring
elections last May, instituted an eNx-

America's part in the oriental situa- that has immortalized little Nell and
tion! Again, why the "almost," and Lilian Gish. The cast calls for types
repeated "almost"? Why not grant almost entirely, and will probably fol-
Japan equal place with us? The De- low the lines of the "S. S. Glencairn."
troit Free Press editorial this morn- The final play will be a translation
ing does as much, to quote: '....Emu- by Professor Campbell of one of the
lation of Great Britain and Japan in Holberg dramas. The success of
the matter of building cruisers- "Beggarman" which was Professor
should mean co-operation-we will be Campbell's translation last year war-
getting into a position to help do our ranted the repetition of the farcial
I part toward policing the world--that humor that is Holberg's most univer-
will keep predatory-minded nations sal contribution to dramatic literature.
in check, and make turbulent cnes The much postponed production of1
think twice before kicking up a row." the "State Street Folies" is also being
Again, your editorial closed with the prepared, and some of the actual
statement that "Japan can attain a wk has been started on the book.
position of respect among nations." t The intimate revue type of show has
Has she not already attained respect not been attempted by many college
a dramatic societies because of the dIf--
among nations? Have we so soon for-
gotten the 5-5-3 Washington Limita- ficulty of procuring the number of
tions of Arms agreement? After the comedians necessary to fill the cast.
war, was she not one o the four A vaudeville tournament is also being
"great powers" in council on mattersuplanped for later presentation.
* * *

TJx ack Scott's Wolverines, with Bill Wat-
Ee. y 1, I " - kins at the piano, either on Friday or
.Saturday last week? If not--you missed
a treat. Drop in and hear them Wed-
nesday, 8-10.
ioil
3 TS
A NU~ E Wh S JOIUE M

Y,
M1
Ak

licriment. It was brought about in the
establishment of college councils i ligious lobby including prominent de- I
nominations and church' leaders like
the literary and engineering c oloeges,
Bishop Manning, Dr. Cadman, Rabbi
and the Law and dental schools, the Vieanotrs
president of each having a scat on the ,
Apparently the government of Mus-
general council for one year. i
geneal cuncl fo on yea. Itapha Kemnal Pasha will not last but
The initial plan was to establish a for a.Hshcontrlandtreatment
for a day. His control and treatment
council members holding office for one of the Armenians may be greatly ex-
year and two year periods, in each of
aggerated. Such things often are. At
the seven principal schools and col- .
te sevhernipalrschoolsane l- any rate it is doubtful if the situation
can be improved any by refusing to
idents of these councils were to coin-
prise the general council, the presi-rar
understanding was ever settled by
dent of the latter to be elected from u
one of the parties refusing to discuss;
it. Furthermore,.it is better to recog- j
campus elected junior and senior rep- nize things as they actually are, ac-
resentatives would be abolished; but
the three ex-officio members of the cept them as such, and make the best
of them, let the churchmen say what
general council would be retained, they will.
that is, the president of the Union, the '
managing editor of The Daily, and a-
representative of the Board in Control BACK-LASH?
of Athletics. Each college council Charges that "dirty football" played
was to handle the affairs of its own by Princeton, not the gibes of the
school or college and have prelimin- Harvard Lampoon, was responsible!
ary jurisdiction in disciplinary cases.
Such a radical change necessarily lfor the break in athletic relations be-
involved amendments to the general, tween Harvard and Princeton are be-
i,: Uis censiitution. A two-thirds ing aired in a weekly magazine and in
majority was required, and the move newspapers throughout the United
failed, fortunately, when the question States. Among the charges are ac-
was put to a vote last spring. This cusations of intentional personal in-{
n e n the present experiment Jury, going even so far as broken
of forming four college councils to ankles, claims of scratching and other
work with the general council withl F1intentional roughness, and charges

1'
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of policing the world an
th^ cures of the world's ai
tainment of respect of n
found by Japan learning t]
of the west, "Preparedr
most amazing change in
life has occurred since tI
Oarh' was proclaimed in
development of liberal po
tutions within, and partn
the progressive peoples o
has been, not "almost,"
achieved.
To return to the
"straightforward as those
nations," just what idea d
itorial writer wish to con
new international policy?
anti genuine, let the pop
abIou it: -I, for one, am i
If he refers to the securi
velopment of concessions,
profitably treaty rights,
the tariff of China, for i

1d dictating
lments. At- THE ORGAN RECITAL
iations wa Palmer Christian, University Or-
he language ganist, will present the following pro-
,ess." The gram in Hill auditorium tomorrow af-
a nation's ternoon at 4:15 o'clock at the regular
ie "Charter Twilight Organ Recital:J
169. The Fantasia in A ................ Franck
itical insti- Romanza .....................Parker
ership with i Variations do Concert ........ Bonnet
f the earthIPrelude....................Schmitt
but really Suite, Op. 25 ..............Bingham
Cathedral Strains
sentiment, Intercession.
Toccata.
of the other Meditation (from "Thais") ..hlIassenet
oes the ed Dance of Appreciation and Procession
Ivey t Some of Mesitersingers from "Die Meis-
Iface kiis eaItersinger Von Nuremburg"
a Containing music by Franck, the
in the dark. founder of modern French music, op(e-
ing and d- ratic selections from Wagner and the
leases, and famous Thais Meditation which Paul
controlling Whitman immortalized in popular
s
ustnse bymusic in his record of several seasons

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xelusirey 1)e'deged
hite ; Hardy Shoes for Men -
.'ermanently on I) iphya
Exclusive Lasts and Patterns
Designed and Sold Only by--
HITE H OUSE& ARD Y
BROADWAYrAT 40'1 STREET 144WEST42ND STREET
METROPOLITAN OPERA HouSE BLDG. KNICKERBOCKER BUILDING
84 BROADWAY-AT WALL STREET
PHILADELPHIA-1511 CHESTNUT STREET

W70

;ac umdo terr4ng that the question giving much weight to the use of
would be put to a vote of the council abusive language by the members of
again this spring, the new system to the Princeton teams while in action.
be adopted, with the change.of the 1i# i d to ee that these charges
constitution, if the temporary plan are well founded. In any game that
proved practicable. takes place between two such bitter
Hence, the proposition to abolish rivals, the urge to win is bound to
the body of six senior, three junior force the players to fight more fierce.-
councilmen, and the three ex-officio ly and this extra momentum is boun
members, will automatically come be- to result in more rough personal con-
fore the council within the next few tact and resultant injuries. Footballj
months. A glance at the work th- is no easy game and with only a little I
year of the four college councils wi' impetus it can easily be turned into
show whether the experiment has fail- an unintentional slaughter by the
ed or not. mere compact of 22 men.
The new college council members There also -enters into the question
lent some assistance during the clasp the element of spite. The fact that
elections last fall and their presidcnts Princeton broke off relations of course
have done a certain amount of com- gives them at once the, upperhand for
mittee work in connection with the j they can say that the quarrel was

other nations, this would seem to he j past, this program is of exceptional!
a new definition of "straightforward," interest.
one that Webster fails to contain. As . . . s
a matter of fact, interference with the "'TH E JA ZZ SIFN,"
internal affairs of China has been a Starring George Jessel, late of the
consistent policy of the West and Ja- two-a-day and now graduated to the
pan. This policy has been "straight' legitimate in a production making
and "forward," interpreted to mean the best use of his peculiar talenlts,
the quickest road for the economic ad "Te Jazz Singer" opened Sunday
vantage of the other nations as against night at the New Detroit for an en-
the phblic good of the Chinese people. gagement of two weeks.
Probably the events of the next fifty The play ran for a year at the Ful-
years will demonstrate that a self- ton and is now on the road for a tour
governing China will afford even j of the major cities of the United
greater markets and greater wealth States, after which the company is'
and happiness both East and West planning a London run. "The Jazz
through=the "hands off" policy which Singer" was an exceptional show----
China forced the West to adopt. Cer- one that combined the serious drama--
tainly the signs point to a unified and tic intent of the legitimate with the
freed China using the tools of the popular appeal of Variety entertain-
West, industrialization and notional- ment. George Jessel is one of the few
ism, emulating the example of Japan. comedians in the country capable of
In 1976 our grandchildren will read carrying such a role. The company is
editorials re-worded to fit the situa- exceptionally large for a road con-
I ;nn-~ jf,, "Oir ghoiim ~ic avP rna -'r+ n doing legitimate time, since the

P:- rim hes--Sororities
2 I a( c H; ci'n- OO b house with dormitory.
t .at ed 1{e l i ute walk from Campus. Posses-
son Juea- 1, 1927. Price $25,000.00. Very small
820 Hill Street
Sit#(n 'on';. 'tr: e baths, garage, with rooms
u oe ). a em neat, oi iurner, large water
lcoru; lot. Possession June 1,
n ilL ts right.
Washtenaw
Fne.; from Canipus. Eighteen rooms,
Inl 'i -Z or sale. Excellent location
for eSor i vt' e rnirlty. Very lowr rental or
CAL
AHEA L E
4k'

- For Sale
G eddes Sectionl (private home) eight rooms,
two bath rooms, study and large living room wiith
fireplace. Steam heat, electric refrigeration, bwo-
car garage, large lot, fine trees, wonderful view.
Price $25,N)9.00. Terms.
Granger Ave.
New, six rooms and sun parlor, water goft-
ener, show:-r bath, trim and appearance that of
house costing twice as much. Garage. Price
$9,500.00. Terms.
For Rent
Several two or three room apartments. I-heat,
eater, and electric refrigeration. $05.00 and $75.00.

L F A. SERGEANT
)VEIit

LES L RZ) K

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