100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 17, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'GE six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PRTT)AV- TWORMR14IT? 17 1!lqV%

._ a. s :u a~~~aavTHF. MTCH lLN TTA L I ilYmu1 tV.

mu

u

- eoo-

I -~

F

F; Er-

00M

. -. :

S KATIN~ RINK 10 QTAV FEW VETERANS LEFT FROM IND AN TEAM HICH WON

SKTING RINKT iA EWVTRAILFTFO NDANTEMWdHWN
FED I AMERICAN LEAGUE BASEBALL CHAMPIONSHIP IN 192
OPEN DURING VACATION

Coachli Barss Holds First Practice On
Ice Before Christminas i Years;
Asks More Canididates
TO SELL SEASON CARDS
With the Varsity team holding its
first practice on ice before Christmas
in years, Harry Tillotson announced
yesterday that the ice was in excel-
lent condition and that the Coliseum
rink would remain open for student
and public use all during the holidays,
from ; to 5 o'clock every afternoon
and from 7:30 to 10 o'clock every
night. The price this year Will be 251
cents for every skate, or season
books good for 40 skates may be pur-
chased by students for $3.00.
The Varsity team will take a vaca-'
tion for the holidays, and no more
practices will be held until the first
week of January. Coach Barss has
been working out with his men for
sometime, but it was not until Wed-:
nesday night that the team couldj
practice on ice. The squad is ratherI
small at the present time and any one
tigible for Varsity sports who is in-j
terested in hockey is requested to re
port at the Coliseum between 6:3t
and 7:30 o'clock any night whileI
practice is being held. It is necessary
that all men reporting for the first
time bring their own equipment.
Capt. Steve Jones, veteran of the
campaigns of the last two seasons,
is out with the squad and is competing
for the goal tending position. Gabler
and Roach, defense men of one year's
experience, are expected to be at their
old positions. Sibilsky and ,McDuff,
forwards, have had Varsity experience
and are in the race for first string
positions this year. McDuff is only
available for the team until Februaryj
when he graduates. Marshall, a sub-
stitute last year, and Larson, who was
on the team two years ago, are others
who have had experience.
According to Coach Barss, there are
some "aces" among the men who are
entering Varsity competition foi the
first time. The new men out are
Knight, Harlow, Fradenburgh, Wal-
dron, Lough, Maney, Moore, Wett-
laufer, Fortune, Copeland, Bennetts,
Hodgson and Coolidge.
ITHICA, N. Y.-Harold Hoekelman
of New York, star halfback on the
cornell football eleven, was elected
to captain the team through the 1927
football campaign at a meeting of the
lettermen here.

S~lSWELL

* ;
I
0 f ]3

t
'
,
u

wtt4GS ONE
TAE BIGGE

"
r
CALL

ref
r_

EST z:
uE.
T f t'
t

Y#
Vg
t. "r,4

Tilden Makes Plans SLAUGHTER LAST WOLVERINE PICKED
To Invade European ON WALTER 'CAMP'S ALL - AMERICANS
Tennis Courts Soon (This is the last of the Walter Camp lineup as a halfback for the second
±__all-American series.) time. Ed Weir, the great Nebraska
(By Associated Press) Edliff Slaughter, Wolverine guard, captain and kicker, won his first all-
NEW YORK, Dec. 16.--William T. was the last Michigan man to be American honors in 1924 while Hor-
Tilden, ruler of American tennis for inamed by Walter, Camp for an all-I rell won a guard berth, being shifted
yeas util.;a. fom entr werehe tare~lforrC(Ali-
sixn thrust a a American berth, being selected in 1924 m
mighty French invasion this year, will h a seonthCamp teforeCam enog
way back to tennis heights in the land nized five westerners, four of whom Bjorkman, Dartmouth, end; McG in-
of his conquerors. were from the Big Ten. This is the ley, Pennsylvania, tackle; Slaughter,
The former national singles chamn- largest representation Camp ever gave Michigan, guard; Garbisch, Army,
l e r n o s l h -asp e i Ceake wrthAhpl tJihnthe West on his first team. center; Horrell, California, guard;
Don, planso ntake withm on f The 1925 selections of Grantland Weir, Nebraska, tackle; Berry, La-
Doeg, junior national chamapionl of E fiac tt, S
Santa Monica, Cal., and Waren F ice, which are also reprinted below, fayete end; Stuhldreher, Notre
Coen Jr., national boys champion of carry on the trend of Camp's opinion I Dame, quarter; Grange, Illinois, half-
] Kansas City, to prepare them for*the of the growth of Western football and back; Koppisch, Columbia, Halfback;
assaults of Davis cup invaders when contain the names of four players Hazel, Rutgers, fullback.
from the Conference and two from the ; 1924
theB'ig" Bill of tennis andI other,.
Paciic cast.(Selected b~y Grantland Rice)
senior players shall have been forced acific coast.
to step aside. Besides Slaughter, the men from Oosterbaan, Michigan, end; Chase,
Tilden, now visiting Coen in Kansas western gridirons who gained places Pittsburgh, tackle; Diehl, Dartmouth,
City, has disclosed his plans to Samuel on the last Camp team were Stuhl- guard; McMillan, Princeton, center;
Hardy, former American Daviscun dreher of Notre Dame, Grange of Illi- Hess, Ohio State, guard; Weir, Ne-
captain, who is making the necessary nois, Weir of Nebraska, and Horrell of braska, tackle; Thayer, Pennsylvania,
arrangements for the trip abroad'California. Stuhidreher, the leader end; Grange, Illinois, quarter; Ober-
Tild n, with Coen, will visit Doeg i of Rockne's "four horsemen," was lander, Dartmouth, halfback; Wilson,
California before heading with the chosen at quarterback while "Red" Washington, halfback; Nevers, Stan-
youths for the Rivieratennisply-Grange, Illini terror, broke into the ford, fullback.
ground of southern France.
Paul W. Gibbons, president of the
Philadelphia and middle states lawn
tennis association, says that Tilden
probably will compete in title events
in Germany and Italy and the Wim-
bledon championships, as well as the
Riviera tournaments. He says Tilden
is in excellent condition and ready to
assume the burden of regaining the
tennis crown, and in his belief "no
player in the world can beat him." -
In France Tilden plans meeting
with Rene Lacoste, who broke his
string of national singles' champion-
ships by defeating Jean Borotra in an
all-French final at Forest Hills last
fall, and Borotra, who eliminated "Big
Bill" in the national indoor champion-
ships last February. Henri Cochet,
who put Tilden . out of the national
j tourney, and Jacques Brugnon, fourth
member of the French Davis cup team,
are other probable opponents. At the
same time Tilden plans to pit Doeg
and Coen against these same inter-
THE1 D 7 trTE
nationalists to gain them experience.
MINNEAPOLIS.-Prospects of an- $ '00
other championship hockey team at ;
the University of Minnesota are not
as bright as they were a year ago,
but Coach Emil Iverson believes that
he will have a strong six. ! WAGO R
Of the forty-two football captainsfo i.,l '
elected so far this year to lead theWI
college elevens of 1927, twenty-three
are linemen and nineteen are half-
backs.

Y

4l

maw

G "
UHLE

E VtLOC, SA - .c,:

Mainstays at Cleveland d
Only four veteran Cleveland Indians, George Uhle, Charley Jameison, Joe Sewell, and George Burns, are
left from Cleveland's championship t eam of 1920. George Burns was voted the most valuable player in the Amer,
ican league for 1926, while Uhle 1ed the pitchers in games won. Littl e Joey Sewell broke into the major
eagues in 1920, and has developed i nto one of the mainstays of the Clev eland aggregation.

ThatGIFTS.
Tht Will Delight the Heart
y ,
- _
What to give the man
is a question most eas- -
Dress and ily answered if you _
Driving Gloves shp atW-HA
$2to$5 This is distinctly a 2
man s store full of
things that men want
- ~and need. Father, hus-
= band, brother, cousin-
all will doubly appre-
cdate yorgift ir it's
O wearing apparel from
Colorful Neckties
S$lto $3
11.1
y r~~2

'Iil111ll11l 11 ill il lllll li l111 81 1 { 1 l lIlillii ltllll I 1111111liIIIII
= May we tape this opportunity
of thanhing you for your patron-
age of the past year anb wisb
S you a ver erv Cbristas an .
Sa pew
- -

_.;

,Jo, Ecotomieal ironsportatfo

I

40,000 twxhod
aoCHEVOE
ail t h
Use this plan to pay cash for your next car and
ssueD BYeffect a decided saving.
ECONOMICAL The widespread favor now enjoyed by the Chev.
ET C rolet Purchase Certificate Plan is partly due to
cnEVROL its fundamegtal soundness, safety and thrift and
partly to the fact that the buyer earns 6%, instead
of paying interest, and receives additional attrac.
tive credits on all service and accessories pur.
chased from his Chevrolet dealer.
Come in! Let us show you why so many thou-
HANSAS CITY, sands have used this famous and widely popular
MISSOUR I.- plan in buying the worlds finest low-priced car.
Touring or Roadster $5103, Coupe or Coach $645, Sedan
! $735, Landau $765, 1-Ton Truck (Chassis Ony) $495,
*-Ton Truck (Chassis Only) $375. All prices f. o. b. Fli*, Mich.
DAT+' sr . ' --~ .K
o --
1 gli -4

}
,;!
r

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan