100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 17, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'AGE F

Tpp A 1.. VIA\...i M 4nATTPI V

TH1n' 1viT(UTCl A M 'l ATY V

FRIDAY, DECEMER 17. 12u

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications,
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Pe('s is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the -postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
$4.OO.
rOffices:Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4926i
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor..........._...W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor...............Irwin A. Olian
NewsEditrs...... , . Frederick Shillito
News Editors....... PhilipC. rook
Women's Editor...............Marion Kubik
Sports Editor............Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor...........I'd orris Zw~erdlin !i
Music and Drama........Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors
Charles Behymeit Ellis Xlerry
Carlton Chanmpe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Charrtbet o Courtland C. Smith
Janes Herald C-isam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger Henry Thurnau
Joseph Brunswickr
Reporters
Marren Anderson Paul Kern
Alex Bochnowski Miles Kimball
Jean Campbell Milton Kirshuanum
Clarence E delson Richard Kurvink.
Chester E. Clark G. Thomas Mcikear,.
I1arl W. De La VergneKenneth Patrick
WV l ia x, tr. :r'rv Morris Quinn
Alfred Lte Joater James Sheehan
Robert E. Finch Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
Johna Friend Sylvia Stone
Robert Gessner William Thurnau
Elaine Gruber Milford Vanik
"oleiran J. Glencer Herbert E. Vedder
Harvey J. Gunderson iMarian Welles
'Stewart hooker Thaddeus Wasielewski
Morton 1. lc',v: Sherwod Winslow
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Advertising..... .......... William C. Pusch
\dcrtising...............Thomas Sunderland
\dvertisin;...........Laurence J. Van Tuyl
Circulation ..............,.T. Kenneth Haven
Publication................John H. Bobrink
Accounts...............Francis A. Norquist
1. Assistants
George Aln Jr. [ay Wachter
Melvin H. Baer J. B. Wood
D. M. Brown Esther Booze
Florence Cooper Hilda Binzer
Daniel Finley Marion A. Daniel
A. M. Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
E. L. Hulse Selma M. Janson
R. A. Meyer Marion Kerr
Harvey Rosenblum l\arion L. Reading
William F. Spencer Harriet C. Smith
Harvey Talcott Nance Solimon
Harold Utley Florence Widmaier
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1926

three questions for a midsemester inS
his course two days before the ex-
amination date again surprised his
class yesterday when he returned the
"blue books."
The experiment proved that some
students will receive D's and E's re-
gardless of method. Of the 71 who
took the test, 17 received D's and 4
E's. Two graduate students were list-
ed under the E grades and four under
the D grades.
The purpose of the particular meth-
od of giving a test, was to make the
students rely more on reasoning andj
their ability to present their material
in a well organized form. From this.
angle the examination was apparently
a success, for the greater number of
students reverted to the reasoning
and- organization process. Those who
stressed the memory pyocess were the
ones who failed to register a high
grade.
All the professor required was that
the students answer the questions on
test day without the use of books or
notes. The questions had to be in-
clusive, but many it seems are not
capable of presenting inclusive an-
swers.
MISLEADING TITLES
The past ten yeras have witnessed
the formation throughout the country
of inumerable organizations under
misleading names for the furthering of
some ulterior purpose. Propaganda
promoters now disguise their activities
under the altruistic sounding titles of
this or that "association," "federa-
tion," "league" or "society." These
misnomers give no indication of their'
hypocritical nature.
Many masquerade under Greek!
names, religious mottoes, and impres-
sive emblems. Everything from sell-
ing books to advocating birth control
is carried on by these organizations.
They are not illegal, they are only 1
hypocritical, and it is not always easyI
to differentiate between the really
altruistic ones and those which only
seem to be.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants wilt, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
A NON-STUDENT SPEAKS
To The Editor:
Because of numerous comments by
the faculty concerning President Lit-
tle's talk at the recent Student Con-

U

COLD AND)
COLD I R
PERTlNNr' ETENTS
I RE~rt1{(s'lc~I1
c~rt- /1 <

IMUSic i

AN]D
D.R A M A
"ALL HIE INOWS IS WHAT HE
REAIDS IN THE iPAPERS!"
On Friday night, January 7, Mr.
Will Rogers, dean of American com-
edians, will appear for one night in
Hill auditorium under the auspices
of the Michigan Theater league. This
is the .second appearance of Mr.
Roger's in Ann 4rbor, and is the first
event of importance in the dramatic
calendar after the holidays.
The Roger's technique is well
known. A lariat, some gum and a
rapid fire patter of remarks that have
convulsed Main street and Broadway
are the only accessories for the eve-
ning's entertainment. But he has
created an extraordinary public for
himself and a unique position on the
American stage.

!![ 1N l!!!1I t!!I l!!Iggggggilt illilil!!till lili11llllillitllli i1111liilill1 ai 11111It ltltili111timi mt;:ttigmttlM
--- Graham ook Stores
Wish you
= A Happy Christmas'
-CG
w7
Chas W. raha
r _.HW H H H H H H H H H H H l

BUGGIES POPULAR

ZT A

I

f ! ___ _ - .

Night Editor-JAMES T. HERALD ference, I wish to give the impressions
NightEditor-JAMEST._HERALD'of a non-student who heard the ad-
dress. It may be that those who are
GOD SPEED voicing feelings also were present.
Over 100 Michigan undergraduates If so, I recognize their right for per-

STUDENT SEES GAME
THE 8:40 RIOT
TNS
/ OfR. TNwA
oT u- *
CELEBRATING
SHY AND UNDEMONSTRATIVE
t 1 - -p
STUDENT FEDERATION
c
HORSE MARINES SAIL
ON LAKE TILLOTSON
TO CHIMES
PERTINENT EVENTS
IN PROSPECTIVE
\ GoEs
te o
VACATION!
oA AU
LATE AS USUAL

D EC. 25

A Square Peg may not fit
in a Round Hole, but a
Square Deal fits anywhere.
We can Fit You.
Suits and Overcoats
$35 and Up
ALBERT GANSLE
118 E. Washington St.

I

Granger's

Wishes a
PLEASANT VACATION

#..

/

Upstairs

To all of its many friends in the student
body. There will be no dances this
week-end. New Year's eve we are plan-
ning another big "bust" and of course
we will be open to greet you when you
return in January.
GRANGER'SA EM

I
, - I

HOLIDAY
HAT SALE

We are closing out all HATS at
Reduced Prices to make ready for
Spring Stock. Every hat is fine in
quality and right up-to-date.
Bring your hat in and have it
Cleaned and Blocked before going
nome. We do satisfactory work. No
odor, no gloss, no burned sweats.
Factory H at Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415

will leave this afternoon to present
"Front Page Stuff'" to the thousands
of alumni and friends of the Univer-
sity, who would not otherwise have
an opportunity to see their favorite
annual college opera. The public and
the alumni, when seeing the show, re-
ceive the spiritual adyertisement that
a college performance affords. But
few people sitting in tle audience
realize the sacrifice that the students,
singing and dancing before them, are
making in order that they might be
entertained and be possessed of a
finer feeling toward Michigan.
AWhen Christmas recess is about to
be realized, and the vast majority of
students are about to return home
for the rest and enjoyment that their
homes afford, these 100 students start
out on a 3,000 mile itinerary. They
spend their vacation in Pullman cars
and on stages. However, the benefits
and experiences of the trip compen-
sate them to some degree, but never
to the extent of substituting a vaca-
tion at home.
Let the alumni and students re-
alize what sacrifices the Opera com-
pany is making. Let us wish them
God speed on the longest and greatest
of opera trips.
A BANDIT MAY BE HURT
Commissioner Rutledge of the De-
troit police department has decided
that crime must stop, even if police
have to shoot the bandits. There is
no apparent reason for this drastic
step, it seems, except that there have
been 212 murders in Detroit this year.
Rutledge is very obviously inhu-
mane. It has long been a recognized
principle among Detroit policemen
that the bandit must be protected from
injury, and that to shoot was only a
very extreme measure to be used on
rare occasions. It may be that the
full consequences of the action are
not realized. Many of Detroit's best
bandits are likely to be shot down in
cold blood, thus seriously hindering
the Motor City's third industry of
banditry. The mortality rate is bound
to rise, and bandit insurance will be
refused, working inveterate hardship'
on the poor working-bandit just be-
fore Christmas.,
The sudden revulsion in the policy'
of the Detroit police department,
though, is seriously very encouraging.
Less symnathy with the lawless ele-

sonal opinions. If they were not
present, I wish to remind them thatj
the write-up in The Daily was by a
student to fellow students. It would
hardly be in keeping with the aims
of the writer who wishes to stir un-
dergraduates from an apathetic,
routine life to include in the report I
conservative and considerate state-
ments of the President.
It is true that Dr. Little satirized
the present methods of education. He
apparently felt that nothing but a
word-cartoon could forcefully portray
to the students the weaknesses of the
present system. The report, however,
described the talk as heartless ridi-
cule. In heavy-type headlines. was*
written "Blame Professors" as though
the President were launching a per-
sonal attack against his faculty. TheI
article ,failed to mention that more
than once did Dr. Little stop to re-
mind the audience that the picture he
was drawing was an exaggeration; it
made no mention of the statement
that present professors are not re-
sponsible for their methods because
they are themselves the product of a
faulty system; also, it failed to make,
clear that the President not only
recognized the existence of members
on the faculty who do understand stu-
dents but with respect for them and
with faith in their .contributicn to a
system in which faculty and students
would have better understanding of
one another, he based one of his mainI
constructive points on faculty co-
operation ,the suggestion of institu-
ing small dormitory units with re-
siding instructors.j
Therefore, although I speak merely,
from hearing the talk and not from
subsequent personal interview, I wish
again to state that to me President
Little's address at the Student Con-
ference was not the unbalanced ridi-
cule that was indicated by The Daily.;
I believe that the faculty have every
opportunity to prove that they are,
not sitting on stones of self-satisfac-!
tion by the road of progress, and thatI
contributions which they can make!
will be gratefully received by both
President and student body who, after
all, are still searching for solutions!
of present problems.t

Will Rogers, Comedian
At present he is on tour, and be-I
sides a New York performance on the
eighth, is working in the Middle West
and East.
In addition to Mr. Rogers, January
will bring an unusual number of
celebrities-press favorites, that is.
Marion Talley will sing in the Choral
Union series, while Ruth St. Denis
and Ted Shawn are scheduled to ap-
pear early in the month at the Whit-
ney. This will be Talley's first appear-
ance, and Ann Arbor is rather for-
tunate to obtain a concert engagement
so early in her phenominal career.
The Denishawns have been here sev-
eral times before, and are always a
major attraction.
In the local theater, Mimes, the
Play Production classes and Comedy
Club are all planning dramatic ven-
tures. Their respective vehicles will
be announced later. And incidentally
Mr. Shuter, as soon as he recovers
from the opera will begin work on the
"State Street Follies," a long planned
and long delayed production that has
been in the embryo for over a year.
THE SILENT DRAIER
Last night in Hill auditorium, Mr.
Anspacher discussed at length the
popular appeal of the movies-the
usual harangue on the movies, their,
influence . . .'This was another of the
innumerable attempts to pigeon hole
the problem, and without doubt was
one of the most effective classifica-
tions of certain aspects of America's
fourth largest industry
In Detroit at the Shubert-Lafayette
theater for the past week, the Vita-
phone (the Detroit premiere of the
latest instrument to produce bigger
and better movies) is being presented
in combination with the "Don Juan,"
latest screen offering of Mr. John
Barrymore, scion of that amiable
family of stage and screen celebreties,
and now ranking with La Pickford,
Chaplin, Fairbanks, and the other mil-
lion dollar personalities. And later
Mr. McIntyre will bring this picture
to the Whitney, along with "Ben Hur"
and other major attractions of the
silent dramer.
When the fact is noted that "The
Big Parade" proved well-nigh as
popular with theater critics as "What
Price Glory" and grossed considerably
more-although this is hardly to be
taken into account-the popularity
and value of some of these attractions
is rather astounding. And it means
but one thing; recognition of the
artistic and box-office value of the
movies by legitimate enterprises. It
has long been admitted that Holly-
wood has been offering greater op-
portunities than Broadway for the
profession, and this leasing of legiti-

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

Ascadem

To you, whose business helps
make ours successful-
We express our warpn appreciation
and cordially :ish you
erry Christmas and
A Happy and Prosperous New Year.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
The Typemriter and Stationerj Store
Read The Daily "Classified" Columns
-a,,,~ w~. w n.a m a

rf

-4

- .I -3. :.2?~f; 'g _._ i"

_f

Say Merry Christmas W;th
Flowers This Vear
Flowers, plants and artificial baskets, etc
Largest supply in the city at Ann Arbor's
three smartest flower shops.
Your charge account is
always welcome.
The Ann Arbor Floral CO.
122 East Liberty St.

COME ON AND RIOT!"
* * *
MERRY CHRISTMAS

I.

THE FLOWER SHOP

THE CAMPUS FLOIST
1115 Sduth Universit

State at Liberty

To the readers we wish a Merry mate houses for the larger pictures
Christmas and a Happy New Year. We of the year will mean the crowding of

- -A Non-student. hope you come back in a couple weeks, certain stage productions into the
with absolutely nothing accomplished background.
"Theodore Roosevelt's sister heckles in the way of study. And that the Just how long and how complete
George Creel as he praises Woodrow weather pian in your home town the vogue of these movies will be. and

' " "su s Y c - .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan