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December 11, 1926 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-11

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f

?KGn FOUR.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DEC EMBER 11, 192>

.___ ___ ___ ___ ___ __.. __ ___. . _ ___ __

Published every morning except Monday 4
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western .Conference Editorial
Association.1
The Associated Puss is exclusively en-1
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.l
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
S4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones; Editorial, 4925; business 21214
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor........W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor...............Irwin A. Olian
jFrederick Shillito
News Editors.............Philip C. Brooks
Women's Editor.......... .Marion Kubik
Sports Editor.... ........ Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor...........Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama.......Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night ]Editors
Charles BehymetgtllisM erry
Carlton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
1o Chamiberlin Colrtland C. Smith
James Herald C .ssam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
Carl Burger 'henry Thurnau
Joseph Brunswkk
Reporters
Marion Anderson Paul Kern
Alex Bochnowski Miles Kimball
Jean Campbell Milton Kirshuaum
Clarence Edelson Ric'ard Kurvink.
Chester E. Clark G. Thiomas McKeani
Earl W. De La VergneKenneth Patrick
William Emerv- Morris Quinn
Alfred Lee Foster James Sheehan
Robert E. Finch Nelson J. Smith, Jr.
John Friend Sylvia Stone
Robert Gessner William Thurnau
Elaine Gruber M~ilford Vanik
Coleman J. Glencer Herbert E. Vedder
Harvey J. Gunderson Marian Welles
Stewart Hooker Thaddeus Wasielewski
Morton B. lcove Sher wood Winslow
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214 .
BUSINESS MANAGER
PAUL W. ARNOLD
Advertising...............William C. Pusch
Advertising...............Thomas Sunderland
Advertising...........George H. Annable, Jr.
Circulation............... T. Kenneth Haven
Publication.......... .... John H. Bobrink
Accounts................Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
George Ahn Jr. harold Utley
Melvin H. Baer I.. Vant Tuy
D. M. Brown J7. B. Wood
X. IH. Cain Esther Booze
Florence Cooper Hilda Binzer
Daniel Finley , )orothy Car enter
B. H. Handley Marion A. Daniel
A. M. Hinkley Beatrice Greenberg
E. L. Hulse Selna M. Janson
S. Kerbawy Marion Kerr
R. A. Meyer Marion L. Reading
Harvey Rosenblum Harriet C. Smith
William F. Spencer Nance Solomon
Harvey Talcott Florence Widmaier
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1926
Night Editor-STANFORD N. PHELPS

tacked on to this or that and so elo-
quent are the dollars that it is no I
wonder thathatatimes our idols show
human frailties and list to the call of
mammon.
We do not condem, we only ques-
tion. These things are so often on
the borderline that it is not easy to
distinguish what is legitimate from
what is not, that which is in good
taste from that in bad taste. Such
apparently harmless things may be
sought as the B. M. 0. C.'s favorite
pipe tobacco, his conception of the
ideal college girl, what Joe Campus
is wearing in the way of "undies,"
shirts, ties, and socks, who are the
premier athletes in, this particular
sport, or in other words what the
mythical college man, who nobody
has ever seen, does, says, enjoys, and
thinks.
There is nothing remarkable in the
fact that the mighty have occasionally
fallen. Man has always been held up
to criticism and in being great has
been misunderstood. It is easy enough
to hide in the shadows of obscurity
and carp on the antics of those who
lead us. But sometihes some of the
boys whose loyal support permits the
B. M. O. C. legion to bask in the lime-
light occasionally wonder if they are
keeping faitl and whether or not
those who permit their names to go
on this or that are departing a bit
y from the elastic bounds of good taste.
PROGRESS
With the announcement of the pur-
chase of land to be used as the site
of a new Press building, owned and
operated by the Board in Control of
Student Publications, the first step
hasbeen taken in the realization of a
dream of all those students who, in
the last 30 years, have worked for the
betterment of Michigan's undergrad-
ate publications. When the first Daily,
written by students, edited by stu-
dents, set up and printed on machin-
ery owned by a board representing
students and purchased with the
1 profits earned by student editors, is
issued from the new plant, the dream
will have come true.
It has been slow work; the profits
of all the publications have been con-
tributed, year by year, to raise the
building fund past the $100,000 mark.
The student publications, like the
Athletic association, are self-support-
ing, and their future development will
not be financed by the tax-payers of
the state, or the University, but by
themselves. It will be a great
* achieyement in the history of college
journalism.
And when the new building is com-
pleted, the staff in school at that time
will enjoy the benefits that it will
bring ,and will have the opportunity
of leading the publications to a new
and higher standard. But those whose
work in the past will have made this
iniprovement possible will enjoy the
knowledge that they did their share
'to bring to frution a great idea-to
make the dream come true.
EDITORIAL COMMENT

OASTEDROLL
HELP
SANTA
CLAPS
These boys at work digging the new
stadium enjoy nothing better than a
good freezing spell, they report. It
makes the ground nice and hard and
then when they blast it out with T. N.
T. it comes out in big enough chunks
so that they can find them in the
water, and pull them up.
* . *
We must see this show at the
Wuerth, which is advertised as an
adventure, in which "Two came from
the end of the Earth to meet." There
might be some question as to why
they had to come from there to meet.
SANTA'S LIST
I ROLLS has established a head-
quarters for suggestion for what the
campus needs. We tried to get Ben-
nie Oosterbaan to help us out, but he
gave all his ideas to J. L. Hudson, for
an ad in a Detroit paper. In all his
list of suggestions of what the college
man wants, Benne didh't mention
good seats in the stadium.
* * *
Of course, he may make the team
next year, but he ought to.think about
the rest of us.
* * S .
"Sleppy losie" writes in to suggest
that the campus needs stronger and
better dog chains.
Well, that starts us off. Santa, how's
that for a fine idea?
" + *
Now, we might offer an idea or two,
Perhaps a snowplow that can clear
off snow would be welcome. Or if
Santa could just provide a sand pile
for the B. and G. boys to play in so
that they can leave the campus alone.
There was a little mistake in yester-
day's ROLIS. Santa wasn't supposed
to be pictured lying down on the job.
3 THE WHY OF RIOTS
Dear Timothy,
At last, we have found the reason
for the "hoodlumism" among students.
The real reason for the theater rushes
is that the Ann Arbor merchants
charge such exhorbitant prices that
the students are broke and to get
their innocent amusement they must
find something for nothing. They know
the shows aren't much good anyhow,
so feel they aren't hurting anything
Tiny.
Browstark
IT'S ALL OVER NOW
As this isn't a movie we can get by
with a sad ending. And sad it will
have to be. For after the death o
J. Paul University, at the hands o
the Arboria army, Princess Collie was
taken away as a camptive of this
powerful neighbor of Browstark, and
her faithful subjects were repelled i
all their efforts to save her.
Princess Collegia Spirita went tC
her death before a firing squad in the
Aboria prison, and armies subdued
the last traces of patriotism in the
t hearts of the Browstark people. Thus
E was wiped from the map a beautiful
t little nation, formerly glorious in its
- achievements in battle, but now re-
. duced to the status of a sulject peo-
ple of a militaristic nation Brow-
stark was submerged like the ne
- stadium. (The End)
e * * *
.MAP OF ANN ARBOR

music
A"D
DRAMA
TONIGHT: The Mimes of the
Michigan Union present the fifth per-
fonance of their twenty-first annual
opera, "Front Page Stuff" in the
Whitney theater at 8:15 o'clock. j
THIS AFTERNOON: The Mimes
41~ te .ucuga LII~l resntrrot"

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GRAfHAYIS
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41

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LOOK! WE ARE RADICAL!
There are various kinds of radical-
ism. There is that kind that is sin-
cere and honest, that thinks, and
perhaps justly comes to its conclusion.
And then on the dark side there is'
that kind that is radical merely to
make a spectacle of itself, in order
that it may shout to the admiring
world and shock humanity. There is
a form of overbearing conceit in the
latter type that is perfectly disgust-
ing; it does not think, it only looks
for the sensational, and right or
wrong espouses the cause. This is as
bad as conservatism, for it is not
based on reason.
The most reason example of the
latter type is found in the newspaper
of one of our sister universities. The
Daily Cardinal from the University of
Wisconsin. is not the best paper in
the Conerence, by far, nor the largest
nor the most ethical; but it is
the most radical, and sometimes
its radicalism is so deliberately for
the sake of playing to the "grand-
stand" that it nearly obnoxious.
There is evidently a shortage of
real news on the Madison campus, for
the most conspicuous place on the
front page of this issue goes to an
article which admits what a good
paper The Cardinal is. It is very
modest about its laurels; it does not
claim to be right or reasonable or
rational; it merely boasts of its
radicalism. There is no great journal-
istic accomplishment about which to
boast, such as increasing the paper
from five to six columns. It is merely
a bald and maudlin attempt to bring
itself into the limelight; to get, per-
haps a two inch article in a Chicago
-paper.
The editors of The Cardinal could
well realize that there are other
newspapers in, neighboring univer-
sities which espouse, at times, pro-
gressive causes also, but without
boasting about it on the front page.
There are three newspapers three
times the size and circulation of The

A the 111chigan Union present "Front '
Page Stuff" in the Whitney theater at
:15 o'clock.
* * *
"FRONT PAGE STUFF"
A Review by Prof. 0. J. Campbell
Front Page Stuff is, in my opinion,
the best Union Opera that I have ever
seen-and this is my sixth. In the
first place it has a real plot, one that
does not disappear in an exhibition of
gorgeous costumes and beautiful
dancing sometimes called the second
act, but one that finishes strongly
under its own steam. Moreover, it is
a plot which itself generates a lot ofl
unforced humor. No ancient wise-
cracks have to be dragged into this
play. b
In the second place the acting is all
on a high level. Every one of the
principals makes a real impersona-
tion of the character assigned to him.
Donald Lyons gives a very vivid and
funny presentation of Professor Dodd.
Without farcial exaggeration or hoary
stage convention either in makeup or
action he keeps his part alive aid con-
tinuously amusing. Richard Woell-
hof, as the Professor's wife, was
charming, dignified, and aristocratic
-a high comedy type. William Lewis,
the most versatile and accomplished
dancer of all Mimes operas, and that
is saying much, can also act. He, too,
avoided farce by acting in the key of
true comedy. He did not depend for
his effects upon gowns or upon lan-
guidly turning a bare back upon the
audience. Russell Gohring and Frank
Strachan played straight parts with
professional ease. Richard Lutes, as
the Swedish countess from Minne-
apolis and the kitchen, was as im-
mense as her tonnage, and Lorain
Norton in two farcial roles way, highly
amusing. These two actors with
Graham gave an hilarious burlesque
of a scene from an opera tragique.
More diversions of this sort would
be welcome in these operas, par-
ticular if skits in this temper deal-
ing with the undergraduhte life could
be invented. The entire group estab-
lished a standard of competence and
ease that keeps the audience alert
through every scene and eager for the
next.
In the next place Milton Peterson
makes his music soar along easily on
a high level. There was little banal-
ity in ;it and no straining for effect.
There was variety, verve and beauty,
and an occasional clever use of whole
toie scales. "Adorable Girl" was the
hit of the opera as the composer
knew, but "Just Like a Rose" is also
a fine song. Gohring sang better than
he ever has before. His songs were
well adapted to his range and to his
lyric style. Robert Graham has an
excellent baritone voice and made
good use of the few opportunities
given him. Incidentally I have never
heard a better Mimes Orchestra. The
precision and accuracy of all the
singing was in a large measure due to
the support and direction which the
well-balanced band of musicians on
the other side of the foot-lights gave
the actors.
Of course the dancing, the costumes,
and the sets were remarkable. Every-
one at Michigan just naturally as-
sumes that every Mimes Opera will
completely satisfy in these respects.
Lewis is superb. His toe dancing is
perfectly amazing and his numerous
other dances are given with whatever
grace, charm, abandon, or acrobatic
skill the situation demands. Lewis
incidentally plays the piano like a
cross between a virtuoso and a jazz
king. To be sure his playing is
dragged in and the chorus of im-
peccably dressed sheiks has nothing
to do but literally to snap its fingers.
Thomas Dougall is also an unusually
sprightly dancer. The special girl's

chorus distinguished itself with a toe
dance of great difficulty. The large
choruses dance well. The grotesque
movements and posturings of the
snow men proved very ludicrous and
the ridiculous review of fashions and
of "any kind of Men," though of course
interpolations, were greatly enjoyed.
The girls, saving your reverence, had
the most feminine legs yet displayed
in these shows.
No, this critique is not a lyric
poem. It is mere evidence given to
I prove my thesis: If you don't like
"Front Page Stuff," you will never like
any Union Opera, and had better wait
for Sister Beatrice and Will Rogers.

HOLIDAY
HAT SALE

.

We are closing out all HATS at
Reduced Prices to make ready for
Spring Stock. Every hat is fine in
quality and right up-to-date.
Bring your hat in and have it
Cleaned and Blocked' before going
home. We do satisfactory work. No
odor, no gloss, no burned sweats.
Factory Hat Store

Bertne Beauty Shoppe
Of course you will need a flat-
tering Bertine Marcel when-
you are greeted at the "Home
Town Depot," December 17.
Make the appointment now.

Dial 3938

I i I South Univesity A -c.

617 Packard St.

Phone

7415 t

""""""""

0

PLEASE
DOaN'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE

MICHIGAN PINS
FOUNTAIN PENS
ALARM CLOCKS
State Street Jewelers

. 17"

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POWWOW
(Yale News)
"All that glitters is not gold" and
conversely we would add that All that
is gold does not glitter. This may be
stating the matter a little strongly but
the analogy does contain a certain de-
gree of truth when applied to the Na-
tional Student Federation. Last week
we were inclined to doubt the efficacy
of the congress at Ann Arbor. On pa-
per it seemed to be too much up in the
clouds for Yale to derive any practi-
cal value from it. But reports from the
scene of action lead us to believe thal
although the leaders may not have had
their feet planted firmly on the
ground, although they may have been
somewhat carried away with en-
thusiasm for their brain-child, never-
theless some practical benefits may
accrue to the University as a resuli
of the conference.
There were inspirational speeches
by college presidents, there was some
vigorous playing of the fiddle, blue
lights, pennies on the drum, et al:
Educational ideals were discussed ani
collegiate Utopias conceived. But it
is quite possible that outside in the
cool fresh air Harvard and Princeton
sat down to a sensible informal talk;
and that gentlemen from the Wesi
came to know gentlemen from the
East and discovered that there is stil:
some virility, some cosmopolitanism,
some progressive spirit in the musty
institutions of old New England.
Californians may have been sur-

We pack, wrap and mail.
Betsy Ross Christmas Candies
Leave your order early.
BE TSY R OSS SH OP
Mi..
E--illtll'1111111Illii111 #t11111¢III1 1111111111tQ11i QQ0lllll1 11111~ i111 QE11 |1111|11Q t111 111111111II l IlIlI IIII IIIIll 11111triQ1111
J 111111 IIIIIll l l fllllillllilllill III11Il iill 111Qil ill 1 11 ll lill IQ91f 11Ql I IlII f1161111li ftt111111 11 Mll illi 1111@QI 1 1i Q19
HEAVY DUTY BLI
""" BUILT IN MATCHED
"B" BATTERIES
SPEAKER UNIT
100 Amp. Hr. "A" Battery
Beauliful
Guaranteed Tubes +ifI I
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All Complete -- Ready To Operate
S.00,
Eveready Tower Cone
Heavy Duty or Majestic
"B" Batteries Horn
100 Amp. Hr. "A" Guaranteed
Battery Matched Tubes
All Complete -- Ready To Operate
$89.50
TOWER The Best
CONES Charger Made
Come in and hear Come in for a dem-
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r $12
- -- users in this city.
$9.50

I

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-11

This map, the result of ten years
of labor on the part of the whole
engine school, and prepared especial-
ly for ~ROLLS, gives a clear picture of
the outskirts of Ann Arbor on the
northeast.
* * *
In the center of the picture can be
seen the river, threading its way
among the weeds along the bank. To
the right of that is the railroad-
Michigan Central-showing the south
end of a passenger train heading,
North. + *
The viaduct down near the depot
can easily be picked out. There is a
load of hay crossing the bridge on
its way to feed the starving horses
of the Horse Marines.
The bridge doesn't seem to quite
cross the river, but that was a mere
error in the photography, as the
Countess from the Opera happened to
be passing and cast a shadow.

i

1

Cardinal which appreciate their sub- prised to discover that the delegates
scribers' patronage enough to present from Massachusetts did not carry
news on the front page which, while Bibles and the representatives from
it may not reach the Chicago Tribune Maine may have been disappointed to
and the Detroit Times, is of just as see that the congressmen from Colo-
m'uch value to humanity as the adver- rado did not have feathers in their
tiseme nt of the fact that the Wiscon- Ihair
c.n ynv.rli.Y l n vn in i a~t~a - x . "

't

Princeton's Triangle club will pre-
ann+" mnkad" a mus~ical (come~dy,

i

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