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December 08, 1926 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-08

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SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAL Y

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MATHER PICSTA
RIRSTCONT EST
larrigan Returns To Squad In Time
'or Saturday's GWame IVitli
Michiigan Stinte
MC COY GOES TO CENTER
With the opening basketball game of
the season scheduled for Saturday
night with Michigan State college,
Coach Edwin J. Mather announced a
probable lineup for the fray following
the workout yesterday.
The return of Frank Harrigan,
guard, to the squad after an attack of
pleurisy, has made it certain that he
will start. Nyland, center, still lacks
experience in working the Varsity for-
mations, and will not be in the open-
ing lineup as previously expected.
McCoy, center and forward, will pro-
bably be used at the pivot position,
Martin and Gawn, at the forwards,
and Captain Chambers at the floor
guard post, with Harrigan as his run-
ning mate.
Should Coach Mather decide to shift
thjs lineup Gawn may be used at
center, McCoy at guard, and Harrigan
at forward.
Nyland, Barley, Schroder, Reason,
Whittle and Petrie, who were scrim-
maged against the regular lineup yes-
terday, will probably see service in the
game, as well as Babcock, forward,
who has been worked with the regilar
combination.
In the practice yesterday, the men
who are expected to start Saturday
were worked first in a signal drill
against a strong defense, and Coach
Mather then tested the weak spots in
a scrimmage, which served to aid thee
development of team-work, and to
speed up the attack.
Although there are many fast men,
on the squad, the five elected to open
the contest are those who have proven
the best combination when worked
together, according to Coach Mher.
If the Wolverines are able to-gain a
lead on the State team, many of the
other players will most likely be given
a chance to show their wares in regu-
lar competition.
Although the present team is far
from finished, it is composed of some'
good men. McCoy is an excellent
floorman, a good close-in shot, and
hias a good eye for arching the ball in
from the center of the floor. Gawne
is not a sensational player, but showed
well in the games he was in last year.
Martin is an exceptionally good shot
and works in well with the Michigan
plays. Harrigan showed himself lasta
year as an exceedingly clever man on
the floor and should be a valuable
pan in the lineup. Capt. Eddie
Chambers has proven his ability as
an all-around man, but is especially
strong on the defense.7
INTRAMURAL NOTES
The second round of the interfra-
ternity water polo tourney, is being
played off now. Interfraternity swim-
ming is also drawing to a close and it
is expected that the champions in both
water polo and swimming will be an-
nounced in another week. Matt Mann,
varsity swimming coach has refereed
the polo games.
The handball tournament has reach-
ed the semi-finals. The finals will be
played before the vacation begins.
KANSAS CITY, Mo.-The Notre
Dame football team will play only
eight games next season, Knute Rock-
ne, coach, announced.
Robert McPhail, of Arlington, Mass ,
was elected captain of the 1927 Dart-
m outh football squad.
COLLEGES

WORTH ,
THEIR KEEP?
Whetlher your answer is yes or
no, as a "reasoning animal"
you'll want to know the facts
which support it. Tl l
STUD)ENT presenits a weekly,
critical digest of college events
which will make your opinion
more valuable.
Try it for six months ($1.00).
THE NEW STUDENT
2929 Broadway, New York.
Here's a dollar for a six
months trial subscription.
Name .......................
Address ...................----.
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Van's
Billiard Parlor
Under New Management

LO YOLA OF NEW ORLEANS HOLDS HIGH SCORING MARK
FOR 1926 SEASON, 25 POINTS AHEAD OF LAFAYETTE3

FLORA WILL PLAY IN
rAor iufrT niflflAII

CAMP ALL-AMERICAN ELEVENS RANKED
AS OFFICIAL SELECTIONS SINCE 1889

U I , W )I I.. U lL CWate amp, the dean of football
i and nationally famous for his all-
American football selections, first be-
Two of Michigan's graduating foot- igan to naime the best college football
players in the country in his estima-
ball stars, Capt. Benny Friedman, all- tion in 1889, and from that time up to
American quarterback, and William his death in January, 1925, when he
"Flop" Flora, right end for three was in New York attending a meeting
years, have been invited to play in the of the football rules committee, hisj
selections were regarded with increas-
annual East vs. West game New ing respect. The Camp all-American
Year's Day at San Francisco for the team was the official team.
benefit of the Shriners' Children's hos- The Michigan Daily believes that
pital. This contest was instituted two Walter Camp's all-American selec-
years ago and since that time has tions are of especial interest at this
grown to a place of great popularity time of the year when various sports
on the Pacific coast. critics over the country are naming
Flora has accepted the invitation to all-American teams and will reprint
join the eastern team which will be from day to day Mr. Camp's last 15
organized by Lieutenant Beckett, as- teams beginning with 1909, when foot-
sistant to Coach "Navy Bill" Ingram, ball began to take on its present form,
whose duties make it impossible; for down to his last, that of 1924. In ad-
him to take charge this year. Fried- dition, Grantland Rice's selections of
man has found it impossible to make 1925 will be reprinted.
the trip. I At first, Mr. Camp's selections were
The teams are made up of the col- largely of men from the east and more
lege stars of the country but art particularly from the Big Three of
I limited in their personnel to men who Yale, Harvard and Princeton which

has so recently been broken tip. or
nine years, no western player made
his way into the "select circle," but
in 1898 Clarence Uerschbergei of Ch1i-
cago was named at fullback 1irom
that time on the middle west lainted
recognition, and in 1921 Brick-Alikl-)r
of California broke in as ati 'enl' nd
gave the far west its long vanting
credit.
Previous to 1909, Coach "HurrM<Up"
Yost's Michigan teams had placed ,two
men on the first eleven, Willie lestou
and "Germany" Schulz, great hab1mck
and center respectively who were
chosen by Coach Yost for his all1,t!)e
all-American team. Benbrq lk, gpar
Wolv rine guard, was selected.. ,, 4
1909 'eam which is as follows:
Reginer, Brown, le; Fish,'Havanird,
it; Benbrook, Michigan, 4g; Coney,
Yale, c; Andrus, Yale, rg lfolbs,
Yale, rt; Kilpatrick, Yale, ;'Mc-
Govern, Minnesota, q; Phll'n ' e,,
rh; Minor, Harvard, Ilh; Co1'-1,4.
SOUTH BEND.--Notre Damne loses
15 letter men from the 1926 ad.

The powerful Lafayette team is
generally given credit for having the
greatest point scoring machine in the
country because of its record of 330
points scored against eastern elevens.
Loyola university teem, of New
Orleans, however, ran up 355 points
during the past season.
Loyola's victories include a 38 to 0
triumph over Detroit university in one
of the four intersectional contests
played. They were scored on only
three times in the entire season.
The coaches in the insets are as-
sistant Wayne Steward, left, and
Coach Eddie Reed, right. Captain A.
D. Smith, pilot of the squad, is shown
kneeling, at the extreme right, with
the football tucked under his arm.
Landis Endorsement
Arouses Opposition
NASHVILLE, N. C., Dec. 7.-A move
for unqualified endorsement of Com-
missioner K. M. Landis' administra-
tion of baseball by the National As-
sociation, of Professional Baseball
leagues, was blocked today by Walter
Morris, secretary of the Dallas club,
Texas league. Morris objected to an
endorsing resolution because re-
election of Landis would continue the
major-minor agreement, including the
draft laws, which the Texan termed
"thoroughly objectionable."
The resolution introduced at theI
opening of the National association's
annual meeting by John D. Martin,
president of the Southern association,
called for sweeping endorsement of
Landis and his administration, and
gave "official notice" to the majori
leagues that the minors wanted him
re-elected "with no curtailment of!
authority."!

- - - - .'z.af' -,. - . .-
TALLIED MOST POINTS
Sammy Mandell Seeks To Recoup Finances
(By Associated Press) I match was staged in the rain whichI
CHICAGO. Dec. 7.-The nowv light- , cut down the attendance and when1

have played their last year. The
games are conducted so as iiot impair
the amateur standings of those par-
ticipating. The eastern team is made
up not only of men from the Atlantic
seaboard but includes those from the
middle west as well. Last year Michi-
gan was represented by Tom Ed-
wards and "Bu4ch" Slaughter, guard
and tackle respectivey.
Among the stars from the east al-
ready invited to participate include
Connaughton and McGrath of George-
town, Welch of Pittsburgh, Broda of
Brown, and Hanson of Syracuse.
Coach O. E. Hollingbery of Wash-
ington State will direct the western
aggrigation which will draw such
stars as Guttormsen of Washington,
Kremer of Washington State, Kelly of
Montana and Blewett of California.

SUITS

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TANS

BLVES

v i v L V, LG . t.-- IC IC Y II i
weight title holder, Sammy Mandell,
of Rockford, is on a barnstorming
tour, after a short honeymoon and
celebration of his new honors, to win
back the $20,000 it cost him to gain
the crown.
Mandell and his manager, Eddie
Kane, put up $50,000 0 their own
money to get Rocky Kansas, the for-
mer champion, to risk his title. The
FUGAZY A TTACKS
FISTICMONOPLY
(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Dec. 7.--Tex Rickard's
monopoly on the services of four lead-
ing contenders for the heavyweight
title next year is the "worst thing that
could have happened to the fight game
in New York," Humbert J. Fugazy,
promoter rival of Rickard, said today.
Rickard has contracts for the serv-
ices of Jack Sharkey and Jim ?tla-
loney, of Boston, Harry Persson, the
Swedish stone-cutter, and Padlino
Uzeudun, Spanish wood-chopper.
Paul Berlenbach, former king or
the light heavyweights, is under con-
tract with Fugazy to meet Tommy
Loughran, Philadelphia danrcing
master, but Paul is expected to join
the Rickard group shortly.
"Boxing in New York, in none.
too sound a state right now, certainly
can gain nothing from the cornering
of the prominent heavyweights by
Ricka'rd," Fugazy said. "Competition
is the life of any business and boxing
most of all.",

the receipts were counted, Mandell
and Kane were "holding the bag."
By the first of the year, Mandell will
have engaged in about 20 contests;
mostly with unknowns, and each timej
he draws from $3,000 to $5,000 for his
appearances in the "sticks."
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

l -
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GREYS

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ANOTHER LARGE SHIPMENT
PRICED AT $35.00

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To the person who is busy every
minute of the day,, economy of time
is a very important factor.

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