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December 04, 1926 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E'f°',!'i P, :.'.C x..." .A.lWE1Y.1.IW.Rj"4J. 1926

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

...- - .- -- ------. - .--....._ __ __ ___-__ __ _

mn urn Corpus Christi's New Deep Water Port
HOFF, LDEA Sends Its First Cargo Ship Overseas
AND PROFESSU oiDIS r... :

ONDE RDONK DECLARES MUSSQLJNI,
DESIRES POWER SIMPLY TO RULE

Was Head Of Dental College From
1911 To 1916; Illness Necessitated{
Resignation Of Post
FUNERAL TO BE SUNDAY
Word has been received in Ann Ar-
bor that Dr. Nelville Soule Hoff, for-
mer dean of the College of Dental
Surgery and professor of prosthetic
dentistry at the University, died
Wednesday in Pomeroy, Ohio. Deathj
camhe after continued illness, while
Dr. Hoff was at the home of his'
nephew, Prof. Henson Thomas.
Dr. Hoff became dean of the Univer-
sity dental college in 1911 succeed-I
ing Dr. Cyrenus Darling as acting
dean in 1907, and winning honor in
that capacity. Impaired health neces-
sitated Dr; Hoff's resignation as dean
in 1916, aid he was succeeded by
Dean Marcus L. Ward, who has been
dean since that time. His work with
the University as a. professor of the
dental school continued until 1925,
when failing health required his with-
drawal from active work as a profes-
sor.
Many prominent;positions in dentist-j
ry have been held by Dr. Hoff. He lead
been president of the local dental so-
ciety and the Michigan State Dental
society. He contributed frequently to
the various dental publications of the
country, and was editor of the bental
Register for 25 years. Dr. Hoff was
a member of the American Society of
Orthodontists, the Institute of Dental
Pedagogics, Delta Sigma Delta fra-
ternity, besides many dental associa-
tions. +{
Well known in dental circles, it has
been said that few men' have contrib-
uted more to the dental profession of
America in the last half century, than
former Dean Hoff. The body arrives
in Ann Arbor this morning, ariA
funeral services will be held at 2
o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the
hiome of his nephew, Dr. Howell.
PURPLE TEAM TO
DEBATE SIDNEY
EVANSTON, Ill., Dec. 3.-Pausing
on their speaking tour of America,
the University of Sidney, Australia,
debate squad will meet Northwestern'
university here Dec. 10. The question
of higher cultural education for the
masses is up for discussion.
The Australians met the University;
of Chicago last week and will go to
Notre Dame Dec. 13, and then meet
Bates college, Maine, on the 16th of
the month. For the holidays a quad-
rangular debate has been arranged in
which it is expected" that Oxford,
Cambridge, Sidney, and an American
school, probably Yale, will take part.
TAMPICO, Mexico.-A large landing
field is being prepared here for the
arrival from San Antonio, Tex., of the
American Army aviators who are to
participate in the Pan-American flight.

"Mussolini has the iesire of power
simply to rule," declared Dr. F. S. On-
derdonk of the architectural college
in a public address given under the
auspices of the Tolstoy league yester-
day afternoon. The speaker, who has
lived in the South Tyrol region of
soutlern Europe and spent last sum-
mer in Italy, went on to explain that
the Italian dictator's ambition rests
fundamentally on man's characteris-
tic realization that life is short, and
his consequent desire to prolongate
the :emory of his name. "Mussolini
has the craving to save himself to fu-j
ture geenrations," averred the lectur-
e.
Dr. Onderdonk condemned Mussoli-
ni's desire and the resultant Fascisist
government based on a subconscious
love pf power. He compared the rul-
ing force in Italy With that in Rus-
sia, expressing the opinion that in both
countries the controlling minorities
have attempted to force the people to
be happy, after their own method of

said, because only the real will of the
people can accomplish such an aim.
Dr. Onderdonk described the results
of the policy of force adopted by the
Fascisists in Italy, declaring that the
suppressing of all who dare to voice
an opinion opposing Mussolini has
brought about the withdrawal of all
opposition factions from the parlia-
mrent, until it has become "nothing
but a convention of Italian Ku Klux
Klan." The discourteous and impol-
itic acts of Mussolini's government to-
ward other nations and their repre-
sentatives, he stated, will cause a
counter force, which will ultimately
bring Mussolini into disrepute.
MOSCOW.-In the Kremlin, behind
Lenin's tomb, I the ashes of Leonid
Krassin were deposited 'After cere-
moni&5.
MEXICO CITY.-The Chamber of
Deputies has passed a bill reducing
taxes on silver production.

0
D
A
I Y

"yv - LS

First of the trans-Atlantic steamships to dock in the recently com-
pleted $5,000,000 deep water port of Corpus Christi, the "West Maximus,"
a 10,500 ton United States vessel, has loaded the first cargo of black land
cotton from the new port consigned to Liverpool. The "West Maximus" is
the first vessel to arrive in the new harbor under an arrangement recently
worked out with the shipping board.
Thousands of residents at Corpus Christi gathered to see the arrival
of the "West Maximus" at the docks, which fulfilled the dream of Texas
pioneers by its coming. The coming of the "West Maximus" is expected
to be the start of a great volume of shipping to and from Fort Corpus
Christi. Arrangements are under way at present to handle ore shipments
from Mexico.

securing this happiness. These at-
tempts have been unsuccessful, he Subscribe for The Michigan Daily.
Is
Ask for
DE'VOE

R
E
A
D

TOKIO PROFESSOR
LEAVES FOR EASTJ
AFTER VISIT HERE
Completing a two-day visit to the
University, Dr. Naohide Yatsu, profes-
sor of biology in the Tokio Imperial
university and director of the Misaki
Marine biological station, has returned
to the East where he will continue the
tour he is making of American univer-
sities by invitation of the Rockefeller
foundation. Dr. Yatsu is one of the!
three distinguished Japanese biolo-
gists now visiting this country under
the auspices of the foundation.i
Dr. Yatsu was especially interested
in the work of the departments of
zoology and botany, and also the Med-
ical school. He entertained the fac-j
ulty of the department of zoology at a,
dinner at the Union on Wednesday
evening, and there discussed the
progress of the science in Japan and
the work of the Misaki biological sta-
tion. He is also an experimental
cytologist, having worked with silk
worms and various marine inverte-
brates.j
LONDON.-John Bull is thinking ofj
raising clams because of the great
number of ,American tourists.

AT THE DETROIT THEATRES
CAS THEATERj
DETROIT
Lafayette at Wayne Cad. two1
"The Vagabond King"
Based on
"IF I VERE KING"
Nightsi to$3; Sat. Mat., 75c to $2.5O.

ARTISTS'
0111 CoT"');RS
Canvas Boards
Artists' BrusIies
Aademy Boaords
Artists' Canvas
Drawin Inks
Enainelit

ARTISTS'
JILS and VARNISHES
Academic
Water Colors
School Water Color Boxes
Show Card Colors
Pastel Boards

WENZLLS
207 East Liberty

ANN ARBOR

.

YPSILANTI

G ARRICK
Ethel Waters
"MISS CALICO"

v'

....
.,.. ...

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In

Nights, 50c to $2.00
Matinees-50c tW $1.50

BONSTELLE tohts - 750,t'50
BONSTEL Mats. Toes., shurs. Sat.,
PLAYHOUSE Soc and 75C.
MISS BONSTELLE PLAYS
in Frances Hodgson Burnett's
Unusual Play
'A Dawn of a Tomorrow'
SHUBERT LAFAYETTE
Lafayette at Shelby Street
Biggest Musical 1Iit on four continents.
CASTLES
IN THE AIR
with Donald Brian, Roy cropper,
Virginia O'Brien

Saturday Special
V6
Delicjou, Cookies and Fried Cakes
16c per Dozen
Try, one of our Testy Pies
PURI TEST BAKERY

516 East Liberty St.

Phone 550f'°"

ai.. r.

r

B'nai B'rith
HILLEL FOU1iwDATION
615 E... University - Phone 3779
Sunday, Nov. 28, 1926.
4:30 P. M.
at Lane Hall
Services conducted by
Rabbi Finkelstein

.. "

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i
1
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ilk
Opposite Lane Hall. FIRST B
R. Edw.
Howard UI
FIRST
10:30 A. A.
METHODIST
12:00 M.-
I 12:00 M.-
Water
10:30-Morinng worship. House
12:00-Student Bible Classes. 5:30 P. N
I Hour.
6:00-Wesleyan Guild meeting.
7:30-Evening church service. 6:30 P. M
UNITARIAN CHURCH I FIRS
State and Huron CHRI
Sidney S. Robins, Ph.D., Minister i' 409 S
December 5, 1926 10:30 A. M
vice,
10:45 A. M. } Cause
Morning service 11:45 A. M
"Tlie Place of Feeling in Religion" ing th
5:45 P.M. 7:45-We
Students' Candlelight Supper moni
6:30
P rofessor Clarence D. Thorpe The Re
"Fith in Modern Literature"
General Discussion State Sav
"The fiend that man harries is open daily
love of the best."-Emerson. except Su

BAPTIST CHURCH PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
ard Sayles, Minister Corner Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
. Chapman, Minister of Lewis C. Reimann
Students y .yrs. Ne.ies B. Cadwet
-Sermon by Mr. Sayles.! Secreories for Stud4ents.

tual Guidance."
Church Bible School.
Mr. Chapman's and Dr.
rnan's claskes at Guild
e.
M. - Student Friendship
M.-Devotional meeting.

:004

9:30-Student Class led by.Dr.
Albert -1yia, Assistant Pro-
fessor of History.,}
10:45--"Two Views of Jesus," by
Dr. Merle H. Anderson.
12:00-Open Forum for students.
5:30-Social hour and supper.
6: 30-Youxg People's Meeting,

~burcb %ervvicc~

CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Herbert A. Jump, Mhj4ster
'elen Ramy, Student"Director
10: 45--"The Privilege of Prayer."
5:30--student supper and discus-
sion hour. "Christanity in
Industry." Miss Cynthia Smith
and Miss Emily Hurlburt, who
had industrial'experience last
sumnfer, will lead.
8:00-Motion picture service. Mrs.
Emrich, of New York, speaker.
Feature film, "The Bride of
the Storm."

i

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C. -~ -

BShoes. for47Vitcj

trIT
c t<? rouse .our
$7 cntljusia~i -.rtle'.that
has individuality andI
sure in tlcv. carin
tlldit ius1-ra nw sat-

E.

.
i
I
;

T CHURCH OF
ST, SCIENTIST
So th Division St.
.-Regular morning ser-
subject: "God the Only
and Creator."
.-Sunday school follow-
he morning service.
dnesday evening testi-
al meeting.
ading room, 10 and 11
ings Bank building, is
y, from 12 to 5 o'clock,.
ndays and legal holidays.

BUTIILEIEM
EHANELICAL CHURCH,
Fourth Ave. near Packlgrd. t.
G. A.cuinann, Minister
9:00 A, M.-Bible classes.
10;:00 A. M.-Regular morning wor-
ship and communion serrice.
Sermon topic: "Our Munificent
God." No German service this
Sunday.
6:30 P. M. - Yowng People's
* League,

ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Ifivision, and. Catherloo Streets
Henry Lewis,, Rector
Tholnas L. Harris, Assistant
SECONP SUNDAY IN ADVENT
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion in
fhe Church:
9:00 A. M.-Holy Communion in
Williams Memorial Chapel,
Harris Hall.
10:00 A. M.-Student Discussion
Circle.
11:00 Ar M.--oly Communion and
Sermon by the Rev. Thomas
L. Harris.
6:00 P. M.-Student supper and
discussion, Harris Hall.
4:00-6:00 P. M.-Open House for
students every Wednesday aft-
ernoon in Harris Hall.

I

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Catholic Students'
Chan el

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3
t
i

p"u%

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. and Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellhorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Bible study.
10:30 A. M.-Service with sermon.
Subject: "The -Figns of the,
Second Coming of the Christ."
The remodeled pipe organ

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES
Corner Hill and Tapan,
Ienneth.i. Rowen, Pastor
10:30
"The Indian Ideals of Rellgion"
Prof. A. S. Woodburne
7:30
"Growingr' TUnt© ,SIvation"

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(MissourI Synod)
Third and Weft Huron Streets
C. A. IIRAUEB, Minister.
9:00 A. M.--herman service.
10:00 A. M.-Bible Study.

William ahd Thompson
.- . - l- 1W

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11 L;iViIJtk A*,LJLr'..L j1ilLn . 14Q 11I

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