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November 30, 1926 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-30

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PAGO IX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUAN

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STRENUOUS SCHEDULE'
CARDED BY MATME
o-i K 'en" XYrester1 Will Conipe t
1:i T'Iiree N oil -#'CiInterenee And
rour{ s c tnk {*, plcets
NEW RATING IN BIG TEN
Michigan's wrestling team faces the
most difficult schedule in the history
of the sport at the University this sea-
son, according to a statement made
by Coach Clifford Keen upon his re-'
turn from the meeting of Big Ten
coaches held at Chicago last week.
The complete schedule for the Wolv-
erine matmen is comprised of three
non-Conference meets, four contests
with Conference teams, and tfie cham-
pionship meet to decide the Confer-
ence standings.
The Conference teams are divided
into two equal groups of five teams
each, which are designated as groups
A and B, The, former is composed of!
Michigan,,Northwvestern, Purdue, Ohio
State, and Indiana, and the later of
Chicago,'Illinois, Wisconsin, Minneso-
ta, and Iowa. At the close of the
regular season the teams placingtfirst,
second, and third In group A will
meet the teams placing in the same
order in group B to determine the Big
Ten ratings of the severm teams.
The Wolverines will begin their
schedule with a , three day trip into
Iowa. On Jan. ,15 they will meet
Coach Dick Barker's Cornell college
team at Mt. Vernon, Iowa:
Two days later, on Jan. 17, the Var-
sity team will encounter the Iowa
Statei Teachers college outfit .at Cedar
Falls, Iowa. The third non-Confer-
ence meet will be with Michigan State
college on Jan. 22 at the field house.
Michigan will open her Conference
schedule with Northwestern on Jan.
26 at Evanston. Purdue will be
Michigan's second Big Ten opponent
at Feb. 12 when the Wolverines will
appear at Lafayette.rThe Boilermak-
ers won last year from Michigan by
the narrow margin of one point, 9-8.
On Feb. 19 the strong Ohio State
team will engage Coach Keen's team
at the field house in the first homeI
meet of the Conference schedule. TheI
powerful Scarlet and Grey team won,
the opening meet of the season from
the Wolverines last season by a wide
margin.
The last regular meet of the season
will be held on Feb. 26 at the field
house with Indiana furnishing the op-
position.

COX, PENN SATE, BREAKS INTERCOLLEGIATE MARK,

S PEAKERl RESIGNS CEE ASDh Gf

GRIDIRON ACTIVITIES WREAK TOLL
OF EIGHT FATALITIES THIS SEASON

(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.-Football,
with a toll of eight deaths and 200 ma-

Cox's time in the run was 30 sec- Bill Cox, sophomore at. Penn State set his own nace and soon outdistanc-
onds faster than the previous record !college; and member of the 1924 Olym- ed the field, being pressed by only a
made by Tibbetts of Harvard, last pic team, broke the intercollegiate few men during the first two miles of
year. and is exceptionally fast time cross country record for the six mile the race. After he had taken the lead
for the distance. j race, in the meet recently at Van Cort- he opened up with a terrific pace that
Although the runners remained landt Park, New York City, his time proved too much for the other run-
bunched at the start of the run Cox being 30 minutes, 4 seconds. ners, and Cox won easily.

V(teran Lelder Of Indians Quits Postjor injuries, proved less fatal during
On Friendly Terms To Enter the season just closed than in 1925,1
Business WOr! ~ when 20 youths were fatally hurt. Tlie
badly injured numbered only 50 in
1925, however.
NO SUCCESSOR NAMED I The death list:.
Alfred B. Primm, Jr., of West hart-
(By Associated Press) ford, Conn., died Oct. 2 from severe,
CLEVELAND, 0., Nov. 29.- Tris spinal injuries received while plractic-$
Speaker, leader of the Cleveland In- ing as halfback on the Amherst col-
dians, since mid-season 1919, resigned lege second eleven, Sept. 29.
as manager today. Francis O. Margaral, 22, died of
Speaker set forth he had absolutely broken neck in Wilmington, )el., Oct.
no differences with the ball club over 1 . Injuredi game at Philadelphia
salary or anything else, that condi- two days before.
tions are as amicable as they ever Henry Kamm, 19, died of heart ail-
have been, but he made up his mind ment after playing in game at Buffalo,
that if he was to get anywhere in the N. y. Oct. 27.
business world he would have to take Leo Jamin, 22, former Detroit Iigh
the definite step he has decided upon school player, died two days after re-
sooner or later. ceiving fractured skull in game be-
Speaker has several business pro- tween army teams, Oct. 27.I
positions under consideration. Constantine Wasielewski, member
Tris is the fifth American league Quantico Marine team, died Oct. 30 of
manager to either resign or be retired
by the club owner since the close of
the 1926 campaign. Lee Fohl, boss
of the Boston Red Sox, was the first
to tender his resignation.
Owner Phil Ball announced the re-
tirement of George Sisler. Dan How-
ley has been named to pilot the! _
Browns. Ty Cobb, most colorful of
all ball players, quit as leader of the
Detroit Tigers. He has been replaced
by George Moriarty, former player and
of recent years American league um-
pire. Owner Charles Comiskey of the
Chicago White Sox surprised every- Long -h
body a couple of Weeks since by
breaking into print with the announce-
ment he had given Eddie Collins hislookig-
walking papers and promoted Ray
Schalk to the managerial role. , uarante
Speaker has won undying fame as
fielder, base-runner, thrower and bats-
man. Specialh
No successor has been chosen.

injuries received in practice Oct. 19.
Wallace O'Brien, 19, member Grass
Valley California high school eievv:.
died in hospital Nov. 16, several weeks
after injured in practice.
Watson Rogers, 16, Granville, Ohio,
IHigh school, died Nov. :19 of iuternal
injuries received in game with MVary--
i le High.
llarry Finnegan, 16, of South Park
high, Buffalo, N. Y., died Nov. 21 of
broken back received in game.
The average age of youths who died
from football injuries, is again 19
years as in previous season. A broken
neck, once considered certain to cause
death, was less fatal this year, three
persons recovering from that injury.
Alonso A. Stagg, 64, veteran Chicago
coach, who has never had a player
on his elevens permanently injured
or killed, was hurt himself this year.
DETROIT.-Detroit will be host to
teams in the national amateur baseball
tournament next summer if plans for
financing the series can be formulated.

t

Vilson Will Lead
Cadets Next Season

O-II

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t;

(By Associated Press)
NEW YORK, Nov. 29.'Army's con-
fidence in Harry Wilson, who failedj
Saturday to kick a field goal that
would have beaten the Navy, is at-
tested by his election as captain for
next year. The election was held on
the train bringing the cadets home1
from Chicago.'
Harry E. Wilson, whose home is in
Sharpsville, Pa:, has three letters, for
football, basketball and lacrosse. He
is 23 years old and formerly attended
Sharon, Pa., high-school and Pennsyl-
vania State college.
The season of 1927 will be his last
at the academy and his seventh var-
sity football campaign.
EKLAND APPOINTED 1927
CROSS COUNTRY MANAGER
Wilbur G. Ekland, '28, was appoint-
ed cross-country'manager of the 1927
team, according to an announcement
made yesterday by Elliot 'Chamber-
lain, retiring manager.
Walter P. Colwell, '29, Fred H. Har-
low, '29, and Howard F. Sparkie, '30D,
were named as assistants.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

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By Wilton Simpson Paige, St. Lawrence ..............LH
In as much as our first All-Con- Ford Lehigh .................... RH
ference football team was not as my- Star, Kansas .....................F
thical as some others, we have select- AII-American Smith Brothers Team
ed a few for your consideration. The Smith, Navy .....................LE
first team is from the animal world, Smith, Pennsylvania .............LT
the second from the automobile center, Smith, Amherst ................ LG
and the third the cough drop com- ; Smith, Missouri ...................C
pany's star eleven, chosen by thie Smith, Brown............. ..RG
College -HumorSmith, Fordham................RT
C eAll-Anerican Animal Team Smith, Oregon.................RE
Lamb, Coe.....................LE Smith, Colgate ..................... Q
Baer, Michigan..................LT Smith, Beloit..................LH
Wolf, Chicago..................LG Smith, Michigan State ............ RH
Bull, Union College..............C Smith, Vermont..................F
Wolf, Florida .........RG If the University of Chicago football
Swan, Stanford.................RT coach will not be offended, we will
Fox, Haskell..........RE appoint Stagg as coach of the animal
IFox, Redlands...................Qteam. Cracker of Jackson would
Fox, Northwestern ............... RI make an excellent trainer.
Fox r San Diego State...........LU
Crabb, Pittsburgh................F
All-American Automobile .Eleven I INTRAMURAL COURT I
Nash, Georgia .................... LE: iMANA GERS
Packard, Williams... ........LT
Miller, Amherst ................. LG All basketball managers should
Holmes, Alabama... .............C I make arrangements for practice
Nash, Occidental . ................RG sessions as soon as possible at
Ford, Northwestern ............. IRT Ithe intramural office. Practice
Studebaker, Missouri ............. RE began last night.
Royse, Butler ..................... ..

ur Coats
aired fine
durable--
ed odorless
balue $6S
COMPANY

Joe McGinnity, of the New York
Giants, pitched and won three double
headers in one month in 1903.
ST. LOUIS.-Bob O'Farrf11 has been
selected as the most valuable player
in the National league.
NEW HAVEN.-The income from
the Yale footbalf games this year was
$800,000.
William Webster, lineman, has been
selected Yale captain for next season.

WXGNER&
Jor mlen 7

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Our line of furnishings is exceptional in
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