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November 18, 1926 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-18

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,THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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FERGUSON MEMORIALS Blazing Ocean Liner With Hundre'ds
Of Passengers Safely Reaches
WIL PORHTRA NOTID
[V[ T " .. ....................:: r.:"i}}i4:vt is %:.,..::.::::::.:":.........%::......":...s::::.;::....
PERSONS AND EVENTS' .......
____:__s?:" ......::.. '..
REPR EN SEET'IONS OF 20 :.
LEAI)N(E ATNS OF
AM1 IIAN ART.............................................

Port FRESHMAN GYMC
HSCHIENTHIE
THIYEAR SAYS

ILASSI
AY
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PRESIDENT WARNS AMERICANS Jf
AGAINST "SPIRIT OF HATRED"

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SIX SUBJECTS CHOSEN
1erguson Fund Of $1,000,000 Will Be
Used To Finance Erect ion Of
Chicago "Mollnenlts
(By Associated Press)
CHICAGO, Nov. '17.-The answer o, j
20 leading patrons of art, including;
several captains of industry, to the
question what persons and events in
American life deserve the immortal,j
ity of stone or bronze is being written
deliberately, in the B. F. Ferguson
monuments.
Benjamin Franklin Ferguson in 1905
left a million dollars, virtually his en-
tire estate, to be administered by the
trustees of the Art Institute ror the
erection in Chicago of "enduring"
minuments "commemorating worthy
men or women of America or import-
ant events of American history."
An example of the trustees' idea of
an important event is Lorado Taft';l
"Fountain of Times," celebrating the;
hundred years and more of peace fol-
lowing ratification -of the 'Treaty of
Ghent in 1815. The subject was pro-,
posed by Mr. Taft and by the Daugh-
ters of the American Revolution. I
"Figures resembling the mailed)
swashbucklers of the Dark Ages, in
retreat," said G. E. Kaltenbach, regis-!
trar of the museum I the Institute, j
In explaining the conception, "signify
the years of the war, marching defi-
titely out of human experience, to1
give way to a new era of peace. TheI
form of the group suggests a wave in
th :sea of time, a billow which has
spent its force.
"For the Treaty of Ghent signalized
the magnificent experiment of the
great unfortified, ungarrisoned Cana-
dian boundary.",
Art knows no geographical bound-
aries, as shown when the trustees ask-
ed a Jugoslav, Ivan Mestrovic, a,
noted sculptor in the public eye today,
to undertake for probable erection on ,
Michigan boulevard a colossal bronze
memorial to the American Indian. It.
is being cast in Mestrovic's workshop]
at Vagleb.
Monuments to individuals, thus far,
commemorate a statesman, a musician,
a missionary-explorer, a poet, and a
business man, Ferguson himself.
"The trustees are 'making haste
slowly' in their decisions as to what
persons are worthy and what events
important," Dr. Kaltenbach said.
"There is a building in Paris called

PHYSICAL T' A1NING IN MAJOR
ANI)IN OR SPOR'TS DONE
BY SPECIALISTS
ALL BUT 71 ARE ACTIVE j
150 Men Started TraiIing i Football
With 85 Crose cts Reiaining
At Close Of S4easou

"This year's freshmen class has
shown more enthusiasm than aty
class we have had here in years," deC-
clared Dr. George A. May, director of
Waterman gymnasium yesterday, in
commenting on the general activity
which prevails this year in the gym-
nasium.F
Dr, May pointed out that full advan-
tage of the abundance of fine material
on hand this year is being taken. "The
whole program of freshmen work in

The steamship Byron of Greek National line won a race with disaster
when she reached New York harbor i n safety with her 397 passengers, de-
spite damaged steering gear and fire which raged in her aft hold for five
hours. Passengers lined the decks r eady to be taken off had the fire reach-
ed dangerous proportions. Photo shows the Byron surrounded by tug
boats waiting to lend assistance.
rIRE, INSECT, AND FUNGI MENACES
DISCUSSED AT NEW YORK MEETING

physical training is a developmental
one, whether the activities are regu-
lar group work or whether they refer
to major sports." he said, "and they
are carried on under the instruction
and supervision of men who ar spec-
ialists in their work."
"The preference is of course being
given major sports," he continued,
"because we like to get these men who
have athletic ability started early in
their college careers on the road to
proper development."
Squads in the five major sports andj
the few minor activities, are gradually
narrowing down. Dr. May emphasized
the fact that it is,.not through lack
of ability that men are being cut from
the squads but that many have found
their time too limited. "But enthus-I
iasm and giving the necessary time;
to- these sports are more important
than ability," he said. "The men are
given regular courses in training and
have to abide by certain required rules!
the same as do varsity athletes."
Of the 150 football men who turned
out at the beginning of the season,o
about 85 good prospects are still train-l
ing. In basketball approximately 40
of the 175 men will be kept, this cut;
being due to the limited facilities and
space at the Field house when the ac-
tual season begins. About 40 of thej
original 125 cross country men arei
left. In swimming.50 men turned out.,
from which 20 have been selected, and
in wrestling 40 of the original '65 have
shown good possibilities.
In regard to the minor sports, 40
of the original boxers are working
out. The fencing squad consists of 35
men. In addition, 25 or 30 men are
doing special kinds of physical work.
"Only about 71 men out of the whole)
freshmen class are not participating
in some form of physical activity,"
said Dr. May. "These men have been

'h OsS Ark e C lark ,Dcan of i
fll~ und lhe inai alle tion of Phi !'
iim, ntlonal honorary SchOllastie.
eehmaa society, t.tomorrow night in
. Ii;'. (br'' is on o~' the]'
\ i c~~oflief ra ternit y. oae
1hTor of h i e
nw!o a a
" , "'() t l 1 0 ii. 1 0\''~ O ( 0 ;
E tta ) l 1 ' a ;f . f { 0ir hr. , t;'101
4 . 0; 21 o w ;l!tlo
r1 A. no' i' :SC
.; 'r *:'? . :*:.'.. .. .,:'' .,,,.. r M . r"),.i t c :i? t '.,.
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i1
;..'.......,.....::"... ." . . . . . .....!..ii l i:..).. ill d y i e Cse t i
:: .: i aof theinrie ty rm0othe l"nivcr-
Pdu'iy anois . he, the fatern1
tives of the .soclit.y from thie Umver At-
President Coolidge sadn up i;: his ,wto at Kaitnsas City; Mrs. Cool- s fy of Illinois, where the fraternity
idge is seated. The Prei .et tediedt cCKansas City's wa' rmenoria was founded in 1923.
with a speech warning Aneians agains. "any national snirit of suspic- j --- __-"_
ion, distrust and hatred. towaid othbe r natiois.'' opon ent ering the University must be
j examined on four units of Latin. Two
° The examinations will be held as fol- units of Areek must be examined by
Sa s p eClow:Greek at 2 o'clock Friday aft- the cenunittee when presented by the
Inj Latn A.Ae noon itn room 1213, Angell hal; Eat- student in entering the/ University.
In Latininiat -o'clock Saturday morning n Thle successful 'andidates are allowed
( jT T ro1 m 2016, Angell hall. the year of tenure to pursue each se-
} nTPhrlins scholarships were es- mester one fhll course in four hours
tablished in 1896 by Henry Phillips. of Greek and one full course in four
Examinations for Iha Phillips .r., of Philadelphia. The scholarship;.hours of Latin
scholarship in Latin and Creek will are awarded only to capdidates for the
be made tomorrow afternoon and Sat- degree of bachelor of arts, who excell BERLIN.-'hse resignation of Prince
urday morning, according to an an- in Latin and Greek\ studies required Eiel Priederich, son of the former
nouncement issued by the committee for adiiission into the University. Of! kaisrer, as grand master of the Order
in charge, composed of President Clar- the six scholarships contemplated in of St. .John, has been ,accepted.
ence Cook Little, Dean . R. Ef inger, the bequest, three are now available
F. W. Kelsey senior professor of Lat- with an incom of $50 each. MANAGUA.- Salvador and Guate-
in, and Campbell Bonner, senior pro- The 'conditions qualifying one for I mala have extended recognition to the
fessor of Greek. the scholarships are that the student Nicaraguan. administration.

r .

,

Prof. E. V. Jotter of the forestry '
department has returned from theI
Forestry conference held last week
at the New York College of Forestry, l
at Syracuse, New York. The confer-
once was attended by foresters from
all parts of the United States and was
for the purpose of considering ques-
tions foremost in the minds of fores-
ters today, these being mainly, the
need of more research and the pro-
tection of our forests from the attacks
of fire, insects and fungi.
In commenting on the main features

understanding of the menaces and
dangers.
In concluding his summary, Profes-
sor Jotter said, "It was apparent
from the attitu'de of the men at the
conference that they were convinced
that the hey-day of forestry is just
coming. Due to the increasing part
that lumber is playing in life, and the
greater prices that its services com-
mand, foresters are able to enlarge
their study with a sure feeling that
their returns will be adequate in re-
spect to the investment and labor."

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P.. i 1_ _ a _. __ t _. __ _ _ _ _ T_. _ L _ _. _. _ __ T 1_. . _ __

the mausoleum of monuments. There of the conference, Professor Jottar .
are deposited the heroes of yesterday said that the question of the preven- H arbor Association

who have been taken from their pe-I
destals. We do not want to supply
another mausoleum."
ADDITIONS BEING
MADE TO MUSEUM
Valuable and interesting additionst
are being made to the Museum as thet
result of the last summer's ex-t
,pedition to Mexico. Dr. H. B. Baker,!
of the University of Pennsylvania, wasI
the only man in the expedition. ByC
securing the aid of native guides and
helpers he was able to get .an exten-
sive zoological collection.
He spent most of his time and gott
the best results in .the states of Veral
Cruz, Mexico, and Puebla. He trans-
ported the whole collection to Phila-I
delphfa, where he is now classifying
it and getting it in condition for the
museum here. A small portion of it
has already arrived and more is ex-
pected.
repairing
See the New Model
Rider's Pen Shop
rehtals
Today and Friday
John Golden's Stage Play
in Pictures
"LIGHTNING"
Sunday
"MARE NOSTRUM"
Note :-Not a horse Picture.
RAE

tion of forest fires has too long been
considered. the only topic concernel
when one heard of conservation and
protection. "The time has come," he
stated, "when through intelligent and
intensive research we have come to
the place where we understand and
are able to cope with the two insid-
ious factors that no doubt are more
to blame for our forestry troubles than
the ravages of fire. Notable illustra-
tions of this advance, especially in
regard to the insect menace, are found
in the work that has been done in the
hampering and partial extermination,.
of the gypsy moth and various species
of Iine beetle."
Another point that was handled atj
the conference was the need of a thor-
ough training in forestry and all of its'
complements, coupled with intelligent
research and an attention to modes of
research calculated to advance the

Protests Diversion
BUFFALO, N. Y., Nov. 17.-Chica-
go's diversion of waters from the
Great Lakes was called "steal," "rob-
bery," and equally uncomplimentary
terms by successive speakers at to-
day's session of the Great Lakes Har-
bors association of the United States
and Canada.
The key note of the meeting was
sounded by William George Bruce, of1
Milwaukee, president of the organiza-
tion, with the assertion that Chicago
stands before the nation as an out-
law city, shamelessly ignoring the
rights of its neighbors and defying the
laws of the land.
LONDON.-The Archbishop of Can-
terbury is expected to retire soon.

excused on account of some physical j
disability or special doctor's excuse."
Dr. May explained that any pro-
gram for collegiate physical activities
must cater to three types of students.r
These are: normal, sub-normal, and
athletic.
ENGLISH WORKERS
RETURN TO MINES
LONDON, Nov. 17.-More than 12,-
000 miners, in addition to those al-
ready in the field, were working to-
day, and a movement has already
started to have the ban on the export
of coal removed. The mines depart-
ment consented to receive a Welsh
deputation to aid the lifting of the I
ban.
AT THE DETROIT TKEATRES
CASS THEATERi
DETROIT
Lafayette at Wayne% Cal, cioo
"The Vagabond King
Based on
"IF I WERE KING"
Nigh ts, $t to $3; Sat. Mat., 75e to $2.50,.
BONSTELLE Night- 75c to $1i.5
iJ11i1GL.G Mats.es.,Thurs. $at.,
PLAYHOUSE Soc and 75c.
Father Loves Applesauce.
Mother Loves Applesauce.
sister Loves Applesauce.
Brother Loves Applesauce.
Yes-AND THE WHOLU WIDU WORLD
LOVES
APPLESAUCE
AD W Y Nights 50-eocto .$3
wed. Mat. S50c to
Sa Cat. . 5-c to$
Something new to Detroit. A New York
Theatre Guild success
Garrick Gaities
An Intimnate Musical Revue.

TONIGHT -ONLY

J
Non-Professional Tryouts
Overr

jL

0 IN E3

WHITN EY THEATRE
TONITE - TOMORROW NITE
November 18-19 and 20

-And on the Screen-

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Ik ui ' iYalnjxo

RUDOLPH

LE
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-III-

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,ATFRDAY MATINEE AND NIGHT
The Comedy That Has Drawn Millions to the Theatre!
Fifth Year in New York
Saturday Matinee 50c, 75c, $1.10, $1.65
Nights Tie, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20

SHUBERT LAFAYETTE
Lafayette at Shelby Street
Biggest Musical Hit on four continents.
CASTLES
IN THE AIR
With Donald Brian, Roy Cropper,
Virginia 0'Brien

SUNDAY-GENE STRATTON PORTER'S "LADDIE

i, to

.

--

;ill!,! All

THE IER50NL GIFT
That carries with it the true

SENIORS,

J

z

Scntirnent of Christmas

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Ia3te* pUone 4434

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