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November 18, 1926 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-18

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I I

ESTABLISHED
1890

vrvr- "T I

fri an

Ar
at

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

_

VOL. XXXVII. No. 45 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1926

EIGHT PAGES PRICE FIVE CENTa

MEXIC'S INFLUENCE
IS SEN IN NICARAGUA
AS REVOLT SPREADS
RECOGNITION EXTENDED TO DIAZ
GOVERNMENT BY STATE
DEPARTMENT .
TO STOP GUN RUNNING
Developments May Result In Sending
Am rlcan Naval Forces To !
Central American Waters
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.-The fac-
tor of a Mexican fostered Bolshevist
hegemony intervening between the
United States and the Panama canal
has thrust itself into the American-
Mexican relations, already strained.
This striking development in Latin-
American relations, which has been
lingering near the surface for sev-
eral weeks, came to light today with
an appeal by Adolfo Diaz, new presi-
dent of Nicaragua, for American inter-
vention to restore peace in that coun-
try, and formed the background of a!
warning by Secretary Kellogg that in-
terference from outside sources in
Nicaraguan political affairs was view-
ed with concern in Washington.
President Diaz, immediately upon
his redognition by the United States,
which was extended today, sought
American aid against a liberal revolu-
tion supported by Mexico.
While the American secretary of
state did not go beyond "outside
sources?" as explaining the recognition
of Diaz as the constitutional head of
Nicaragua, his warning was founded
on official advices of gun-running ex-
peditions from Mexican ports to Nica-
ragua and Guatamala. . .
Another development in the situa-
tion today was a call on President
Coolidge by Charles Eberhardt, Ameri-
can minister to Nicaragua, who has
been in this country on leave.
What action the Washington admin-
istration will take on the Diaz re-
quest for American intervention was
not forecast. It had not reached the
state department tonight. Undoubt--
edly, however, it affords a basis upon
which could be founded employment
of American naval forces in Nicara-
guan waters to prevent the landing
of arms from Mexico for the revolu-
tionists, should the Washington gov-
ernment deem the situation serious
enough to warrant that action.
The developments today served to
disclose- the reasons for the added
seriousness with. which Mexican-Am-
erican relations have been considered
here for the past 10 days. For the
moment, the question of Mexican in-
terprence in Central American coun-
tries,. presumably. for the purpose of
fostering radical propaganda and Bol-
shevist philosophy has swept off the
stage other questions pending between
Me ico and the United States, such as
the oil and land laws and claim con-
troversies.
Applications For
-HopTickets To
$e Offered Today
Application forms for J-Hop ticklets
will be distributed from 2 to 5 o'clock
this :afternoon, tomorrow, and Mon-
day afternoons at a desk in the Union
lobby, tMarion Hodgson, '28E, chair-
man of the Hop ticket committee, an-
nounced yesterday.
Applications may be returned to the
desk at the Union or may be mailed to
the Chairman of the J-Hop committee.
care 01 the Union, it was also an-

nounced. Stamped self-addressed en.
velopes must accompany all applicaj
tions, and acceptances or rejection
notices will be sent out in 10 days.
Booth- preferences will be statedI
on the application. Independents may
designate, preference with others at-
tendingthe Hop.Otherwise, they will
be placed in independent booths by
the J-Hop committee. Fraternities'
will be expected to have at least l0
men applying for tickets before a
booth. preference is made.
Juniors of good standing who have;
paid their class dues will ne given
1irst preference in the distribution of
tickets.

Secretary Gives
Nicarague Help

Secretary Kellogg
ALBRIGHT DESCRIBES
WORK IN HOLY LAND
Director Of Oriental Research School
Blames Poor Choice Of Sites For
Lack Of Interesting Finds
WILL LECTURE TODAY
"Lack of interesting discoveries in
Palestine has been due to the poor
judgment in the choice of sites, and
the fact that the good sites have not
been properly and completely excavat-
ed," declared W. F. Albright, director
of the American School of Oriental
Research, yesterday afternoon in Na-
tural Science auditorium. Mr. Al-
bright's subject was the "New Era
in Palestinian Archaeology."
With the aid of slides depicting
maps, sites of proposed excavations,
actual operations, and various speci-
mens, Mr. Albright traced the history
of archaeology in the region of the
Holy Land. Extremely great progress
has been made since the war, accord-
ing to Mr. Albright. Cooperation be-
tween various nations engaged in the
work and with the local government
is an important factor, he stated.
Two lectures will be given today
by Mr. Albright in Natural Science
auditorium. At 4:15 he will speak on
the subject of "The Excavation of an
Israelite City." The city in question.
according to the speaker, is Tell Beit
Mirsim, the ancient Kirjath-Sepher of
the Bible. The second lecture, to be
given at 8 o'clock this evening, will
be on "The Dawn of History in the
Jordan Valley."
Mr. Albright has held the position
of director of the American School
of Oriental Research in Jerusalem for
the past seven years. The Universit,
of Michigan is one of the schools con-
tributing to the institution's support.
Mr. Albright's lectures are given un
der the auspices of the University and
the School of Religion.
Physical Effects
Of Chemistry Is
To Be Discussed
Dr. Donald D. Van Slyke, of the
Rockefeller institute in New York
city, will give a lecture on the "Phy-
sical Chemistry of the Blood" in room
165 of theChemistry buildingtthis af-
ternoon at 4:15 o'clock. Doctor Van
Slyke is one of the foremost authori-
tics on the behaviour of gases in the
tibsood and is also known for his work
on the chemistry of proteins.
Ile is a graduate of the University
and received his A. B. in 1905, and his
Ph.D. in 1907 under Prof. Moses Gom-
berg of the department of chemistry.
Dr. Van Slyke has been at the Rocke-
feller institute since he graduated
here in 1907, and has been chief che-
ist of their hospital since 1914. In
1921-22 he organized the work in
chemistry at Pekin Union University
in China. His father, L. L. Van Slyke,
graduated here in 1879 and was a pro-
fessor of chemistry here from 1882-
85.

ROUMANIAN PRINCESS
IS UNHURT WHEN SHE
DRIVES CAROFF ROD
ILEANA CONTINUES ON TRIP ;
QUEEN IN INDIANAPOLIS
IGNORANT OF EVENT
IS FORCED INTO DITCH
Cleveland Will .Arm 1,000 Police And
Firemen To Guard Mare On Visit;
Fear Disorders Of Protest
(By Associated Press)
DANVILLE, Ill., Nov. 17.-Princess
Ileana of Roumania, driving a gift car
from Chicago to Indianapolis, was I
forced into a ditch in passing a motor
truck at Grant Park, Ill., today, and
was so unnerved and shaken up by;
the experience that she stopped in a
physician's office at Roseville, Ill., for
treatment. She had fainted at the
shock.
The doctor recommended that she
stop at a Danville hospital and spend
the night there in recuperation, and
a reservation was made there for her,
but an hour after leaving Roseville
she had failed to appear and officials
believe she had decided to proceed
to Indianapolis without further treat-
ment.
(By Associated Press)J
INDIANAPOLIS, Nov. 17.-Marie,.
Queen of Roumania, was welcomed to
Indiana tonight unmindful of the ad-
ventures that had befallen her child-
ren, Prince Nicholas and Princess
Ileana in an overland drive from Chi-
cago.I
None had informed the Queen of
the illness of the princess, who for a
time threatened to stop at a hospital
at Danville, Ill. The royal children,
after a series of mishaps on the rain-
drenched roads of Illinois and Indi-
ana, reached the Indiana capital in a
mud-encrusted motor car while the!
city and state were voicing their wel-
come to Queen Marie. The travelers
were reunited at a banquet and dance'
which culminated the stay at Indiana-
polis.
The party was scheduled to leave
Indianapolis for Louisville at 12:30
a. m.
- In the welcoming party at Indiana-j
polls was a delegation of Roumanian
women in native costume. Marier
alighted to hear a salutation in her
native tongue.
(By Associated Press)
CLEVELAND, O., Nov. 17.-One
thousand armed policemen and fire-
men will form a permanent escort for
Queen Marie and her party during
their visit in Cleveland.
DAY STUDENTS AT
' HOSPITAL TO BE
DINNER GUESTS
With the purpose of fostering a
greater interest in the day school con-
ductedl at the University hospital, the
United King's Daughters of Ann Ar-
bor are completing plans for a dinner
to be held in the nurses dining room of
the hospital Monday night.
A program including an address by
Joseph Snitzler, Mt. Pleasant lawyer
on "The Real Problem of the Crippledf
Child," and music by Granger's Mich-
iganders has been arranged. The com-_
mittees in charge expect an attend-
ance of 700 at the affair, with delega-
tions from Detroit, Jackson, Mt. Clem-
ens, Flint, and Howell attending, in'
addition to communities in Washten.
aw county. Members of local men's
organizations will also be present.
RANGER TALKS TO'
FORESTRY GROUP

Speaking last evening at an infor-
mal meeting of the Forestry club,
Donald E. Romano, '14, explained the
duties of a forest ranger. Since his
graduation in 1914 Mr. Romano has
been in the West. He has spent sevenE
years in Salmon forest, Idaho, where
he was district ranger for 200,000
acres of timber land.
"As college man with his technical
knowledge of forestry, has a much
better chance of promotion than one
who lacks this training," Mr. Romano
stated. "For that reason I myself
have come back to Michigan to get my
master's degree."

UNION MEMBERS RATIFY
CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGES
All theproposed amendments
to the Union constitution were
unanimously passed at a meet-
lng of Union members last night.
Out of 626 votes cast, none was
cast against any one of the sec-
tions of the ballots.
These amendments vill take
effect immedately, it was an-
nounced by Lester F. Johnson,
'27L, presidentdof the Union,
who conducted the meeting and
explained the changes in the
constitution.
The new amendments provide
that the $10 Union elements of
the tuition fee paid last fall and
at any succeeding time will be
refunded to any life members,
and will be credited toward life
memberships for any others.
The total cost of lifemember-
ships will be $50, except for this
year and any succeeding year's
freshmen, who wil automatically
b)ecome life members upon the
completion of four years in the
University. The payment of the
Union element of summer school
tuition will be credited for its
full amount.

WICKERSHAM TO TELL
OF GENEVA MEETING1
Former Attorney General Will Speak
About Likelihood Of America's
Entering World Court
BRINGS EUROPE'S VIEW
Discussing the "Present Probability
of American Adherence to the World
Court," George W. Wickersham, for-
mer attorney general of the United
States, will speak at 8 o'clock tomor- i
row night in the Natural Science audi-
torium. Mr. Wickersham returned
recently from a visit to Europe, in
the course of which he attended the
conference of states signatories to the
Permanent Court of International Jus-
tice at Geneva, and brings the Euro-
pean view of the situation.
Interest in the subject has been
aroused recently by President Cool-
idge's Armistice day speech in Kan-
sas City, in which he stated that the
United States would enter the World
Court on its own reservations, or not{
at all. The conference which Mr.
Wickersham attended this summer
was held for the purpose of consider-
ing the American reservations as pro-j
vided in the Swanson resolution, pas-
sed last winter.
The meeting tomorrow night is be-
ing held under the direction of the
League of Nations Non-Partisan asso-
ciation, and will be free of admission
charges, as the expenses of the asso-
ciation are borne by Detroit and Ann
Arbor League of Nations adherents.
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school will preside.
Grid-Graph Will
Be Held At Field
House Saturday
Owing to the fact that Hill audi-
torium will be used for the convoca-
tion to Queen Marie of Roumania, the
grid-graph for the Michigan-Minneso-
ta football game Saturday, has been
transferred to Yost Field House. This
change has necessitated many changes
in the usual system used at the grid-.
graphs.
Tickets will all be the same price,
50 cents, instead of 35 dents for bal-
cony seats and 50 cents for main floor
seats as is the custom. The manage-
ment has been forced to this step
by the conditions which makehsepara-
tion of seats impracticable.
(According to the present arrange-
ments, the board will be set up on

VON KARMAN Sp AKSBigTen Leader
Resigns Olympic
CONCERNING MllERN Committee Post
AERONAUTICS METHODSn

STRESSES THE CONTRIBUTIONSI
OF PAST TWO DECADES
TO SCIENCE
DEVELOPS FORMULAEE
Speaks On Conception Of Impact;
Deals With Properties Of Object
In Air Stream
Dealing with the various contribu-
tions made to the science of aeronau-
tics in the past two decades, Prof.
Theodor von Karman, head of the
aerodynamical laboratories at Achen
Germany, and now on a tour of the
United States for the purpose of pro-
moting aviation, developed numerous
formulae and fundamental aerodyna-
mical theories in a series of two lec-
tures which were concluded yester-
day afternoon. The subjects of Pro-
fessor von Karman's lectures were,
"Present Day Applications of Modern
Aerodynamical Theories."
The first phase , of Professor von
Karman's premier talk was based on
the conception of impact. In this field,
he explained the group of formulae
dealing with the properties of an ob-
ject when it is acted upon by a stream
of air, namely; that the resistance of
a body is proportional to the product
of the quantity, density, and velocity
of the air.
Professor von Karman dwelt at some
length on the viscosity or internal
friction, of fluids. He also explained
various phases of the work of Rey-
nolds, the English physicist, and other
noted scientists in this field of work.
A discussion of the formulae of tur-
belent motion, in connection with sur-!
faces, was the basis of the aeronauti-
cal expert's second lecture. Equations
for this feature of aerodynamics, and<
their accompanying laws, were de-
veloped and explained. The work of
Oseen and Lanchester, noted mathe-
ticians, were used to help prove thet
various derivations of mathematicalt
formulae.
The important properties of skin
friction, or that friction which is pro-
duced by a stream of air against a
plane surface, were also discussed by
the speaker, and illustrated by sev-
eral slides showing the results of some<
experiments in this field. '
Professor von Karman is one of the1
best known authorities of theoretical
aerodynamics, and is touring theE
United States under the auspices of1
the Daniel Guggenheim fund for the
promotion of aeronautics. Included in
his visits besides the University of
Michigan, are: the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology, New York uni-
versity, and the California Institute
of Technology, the most imporant
schools of the country which are of-
fering courses in aeronautics. At the
California Institute of Technology, he
will take an active hand in the con-
struction of an aeronautical labora-
tory that is to be built there.
The aviation expert is also schedul-
ed to lecture before an assembly of
the foremost aeronautical authorities
of the United States at a meeting in
December in Washington.
CLASS ELECTION
Election of officers for the freshman
law class will be held at 4:00 o'clock
today in Room B of the Law school.
SAULT STE. MARIE-The hered-
itary right of the Indian to hunt and
fish at any time of the year again is
in dispute.

l

' f
ELECTION OF PROUT
RESULTS IN DISPUTE
Opposition Leaders Sever Connections
With Olympic Association And
I1elated Committee
GRIFFITHS WITHDRAWS-
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 17.-Scoringa I
sweeping victory in a sharp contest
for control of the American Olympic
organization, the forces led by the
Amateur Athletic Union elected Willi-
am B. Prout, of Boston, to the presi-
dency of the American Olympic asso-
ciation as well as the committee in
charge of this country's participation
in the 1928 Olympic games at Amster-
dam.
The election of Mr. Prout and other'
officers supported by the A. A. U. was f
followed by the dramatic withdrawal
of opposition leaders fron active con-
nection, either with the Olympic as- {
sociation or the Olympic committee
now taking overactive control.
Principal among these leaders were
Brig.-Gen. Palmer E. PieAe, presidentd
of the National Collegiate A. A., and
Col. Henry Breckenridge, president ofE
the National Amateur Athletic federa-2
tion. Their withdrawal waA interpret- -
ed as an open break between the fac-
t tion which led and that of the A. A. U.
both of which admitted today's quad-
rennial meeting of the Olympic asso-
ciation determined to have a "final
show-down" on control.
Both Brigadier General Pierce and
Colonel Breckenridge had been nam-
ed members of the executive commit-
tee of the Olympic association, but
they immediately resigned the oflices
tendered them. They were joined by
Maj. John L. Griffiths, commissioner
of the western conference, who also
withdrew from the executive commit-
tee.
HARVARD COACHI
IS TO CONTINUE
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 17.--
Arnold Horween of Chicago, who hasf
guided the Harvard football team this
season, tonight announced taht heI
had accepted an offer to return to
Cambridge next year. Some time ago
it became known that 'the athletic
committee had offered Horween a
contract for a term of years as head
football coach.

John L. Griffiths

WOLEIE INTRAIN
THIS AFTRNON FOR
GA TH GOPHERS
STUDENTS REQUESTED TO BE AT
STATION TO SPUR ON
GRIDDERS
TEAM LEAVES AT 2:26
1900 Minnesota Tickets Sold Quickly
On Arrival; Students Purchase
Only 253 Of These '
Michigan's football team will leave
this afternoon at 2:26 o'clock for Min-
neapolis to battle Minnesota. The team
will leave on a special train, which
will make no unnecessary stops, and
will arrive in Minneapolis tomorrow
morming.
The round trip fare for the special
train is $57.36, including an upper
berth. From Chicago to Minneapolis
a special round trip rate has been
fixed, but fron Ann Arbor to Chicago
no reduction has been made.
Out of the 1900 tickets that were
sent to the administration building
AT 2:26 TODAY I
I Coach Yost and his Wolverine
eleven will depart at 2:26 today
for Minneapolis where they in- [
I vade the Minnesota stronghold I
| Saturday in a game which will I
I determine whether or not Mich- I
igan is to finish in a tie with the
I Northwestern football team for
I the 1926 Conference champion-
ship.,
Although t h e Wolverines
smothered the Gophers 20-0 in
I their first meeting this year,
I. Coach Spears' men have improv-
I ed steadily, and are expected to
put up a strong fight to reyenge
the early season defeat.
The Michigan team needs the
,backing of the student body, for
it is the only indication that the
school is behind the men In what
is expected to be the hardest,
struggle of the season. A large
f turnout at the station will send
{ the men off in the proper spirit. {
I Beat Minnesota!
STUDENT COUNCIL.
from the Minnesota Athletic associa-
tion 253 tickets were sold to students.
The number of students that will make
the trip will be very few, because of
the distance and expense. The vast
majority of the tickets were sold to
alumni living in Iowa, Wisconsin, and
Minnesota. The 1900 tickets were sold
almost immediately upon their arrival
and no tickets have been availabe for
the past two weeks. Minnesota re-
ports a similar situation, thus assur-
ing a capacity crowd for the final
game of the season.
It has been the custom in the past,
through loyalty to the University and
enthusiasm for the team, for the stu-
dent body to assemble at the Michigan
I Central depot to see the team off. The
Student council was disappointed at
the turn out when the team traveled
to Annapolis and Columbus. For the
past two years the team has not re-
ceived the support at the depot that
it has been accustomed to in former
years, contends the council. A large
turn out is anticipated this afternoon
so as to rival the reception given the
team two years ago when the left for
Minneapolis to dedicate Minnesota's
new stadium. Being the last game
and the most important, students are
requested to be at the station in large
numbers. At 6 Suiday night the spe-
cial train will return to Ann Arbor
and the Student council also asks a
large turn out to geet the team after
their battle with Minnesota.

I

FORMER DAILY NEWS EDITOR IS
NAMED NA TIONA L SECRE TAR Y OF
SIGMA DELTA CHI AT CONVENTION

MAKES NEW

AK
MARK

one of the sides of the Field House. BY SMITH H. CADY, JR. r
It has not been decided whether to MADISON, Wis., Nov. 17.--Tobert
use the east side or west side. The Tarr, '24 former news editor of the K
bleachers that are used for the bas- T
ketball games will be erected to face I Michigan Daily, was elected national
.the board. The audience will sit in secretary of Sigma Delta Chi, national'
these bleachers and the balcony of professional journalistic fraternity, at
the Field house. I the closings session of it's convention
The change in locations has made I
it necessary to set up new wire con- here this afternoon. Tarr is now city
nections tothe Field House,and also editor of the Pontiac Press.
to make further electrical fixtures Willis J. Abbott, '84L, editor of the
necessary for the operation of the Chiistian Science Monitor, was hon-,
board. I ored by the convention by being elect-
Another feature of Saturday's grid- ed honorary member of the fraternity.
graph will be the appearance of the T. H. Tapping, field secretary andj
Varsity band. t business manager of the Michigan}
ar a.Alumni association and a past pres-
ident of the fraternity, retired fromI
SSTUDENT MEE TING the position of trustee of the Quill
TO BE HELD HERE fund. The Quill is the national maga,
zine of the fraternity.
Roy L. French, of the journal fac-
Plans for a National Student federa- ulty of the University of North Dakota,
tion convention which will be held was elected president for the next
Ch r l 9 o 4 wPr i+,-e a . , T o. t~~ r R, ofnnrit n ra I

resented ac the convention, which will
be held next year at the University of
Kansas at Lawrence, Kansas.
Editor Is Honored
# Y

Distribution Of
Blanks For Opera
Tickets To Start
Application blanks for tickets to the
Ann Arbor performances of "Front
Page Stuff," the 21st annual Union
opera, which will open Dec. 6 at the
Whitney theater for a week's run,
lwill be available for Union members
today, in the lobby of the Union.
These blanks, together with those al-
ready issued to full paid life and par-
ticipating Union members, must be
filled out and returned to the Union
by Wednesday in order to secure pref-
erence over allotments issued after
that date to other groups.
Union members may obtain appli
cations at the main desk in the lobby
from 2 to 5 o'clock every afternoon
from today until Nov. 24.
Tickets this year will be $3, $2.50,
$2, and $1.50. Further a- nouncements
regarding the date when Umversity
wnmn a nn or. A rmomhorcr main

(By Associated Press) CONVOCAlTION IN HONOR OF QUEEN
NORFOLK, Va., Nov. 17.-Maj. MARIE WILL BE DEVOID OF SPLENDOR
Mario de Bernardi of Italy, Schneider I
cup winner, made an average speed
of 258.873 miles per hour over the Simple exercises have been arranged Queen will arrive at Hill auditorium
three kilometre course here today, ex- for the convocation in honor of Queen from the President's residence and
ceeding the record made last year by Marie of Roumania which will take will be welcomed to the University
Lieut. James H. Doolittle, U. 0. A., by place shortly after 3 o'clock Saturday by the regents of the University and
nearly 13 miles an hour. afternoon in Hill auditorium. The pro- the deans of the various schools and

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