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November 12, 1926 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-12

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FIiDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1926

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

?KGE THREI*

NEWSPAI PERS FEATURE CRIM E JIresults in mating w heroic, dramatic, elements of human life and as such isF As a typical example of some of the the editor of the World decided upon I lation. TI
clever and resourceful exhibit out of demanded by the public. problems confronting editors when a compromise, the result of which i modern n
U N E A LY A S R Ma criminal, would be eliminated." Mr. Haines expressed a belief that'faced with this question, Mr. Jones was a dcinite loss of circulation when suin c
Professor Brumm explained that crime news as treated by the news- cited that of the New York World last the other New York papers played up view
!many newspapers determine the value papers, in itself, is not responsible winter when the World court news the sensational Rhinelander casen, th
(Continued from Page 1) 3 Professor Brumm pointed out that of news of this nature from the so- for any noticeable amount of crime. and the Rhinelander case came into "Furthermore," concluded Mr. Jones, and the i
news should or should not be publish- the facts in a crime story may be ac- called "police beat point of view: "If the publication of crime news were prominence simultaneously. To which, "had the Ne w York XWorld omitted this which de
-fyf h news is something extraordinary that;made illegal in the United States to- the editor had to ask himself, shall I latter news entirely, it would have re- forced to
ed, 1 would ,be in favor of abolishing1 curate but so arranged as to tell an lapn oehn xrodni ht aeilgli h ntdSae o ocdt
t. In only the exceptional cases does utra b.ten atrioed fo te happens to an ordinary man, or some- morrow, and newspapers became as give the preference? As it happened, suted in a tremendous loss of circu- cisions."
it do anyone any good."u. ths esmhhf ordinary that happens to an cx- types more like the Christian Science
Mr.Haines referred to the case of story itself are selected and inserted traordinary man." Monitor," concluded Mr. hlaines, "I
the Toledo dubber whose criminal purely for their dramatic value. "This With reference to the quest on of venture to say that in five years the
activities have been terrorizing women pis , coimnlaw error, and is vicious and suppressing crime news, Mr. .Jones ;taste of the American public for this
tfalse,' he declared, and added, "if a stated, "At the pre:;ent time i is i kind of news would e lost.
there.'There are many phases of this new paper would make it a policy to! practical for a newspaper to omit Mr. Jones, with reference to the
haps be said that it serves well as a sentii only to an understanding o place, crime is so defnitey repre- arw esecially attempting to suppress
warning to the women to remain at what significance it holds for s0- sentative of a particular problem that news of an anti-social nature by 1eav-
s ciety, there would be no danger of community newspapers find it necles-ug it out altogether or by handling
publishing stories of his activities; suggestibility, a great factor in crime sary to deal with it to a certain ex- it. as a common problem and thereby
pblishng storieo isctivitie; - news. Plain facts only shou- be tent at least." H also- agreed that treating it in a conservative way, are
buit at the same time, instead of run-1 . ve admvciote
ning lengthy sensational stories of: given nd vicious :ug:estion which crime news contains certain dramatic certainly doing a great service."
the attacks of the criminal, why not-
merely insert a small box notice on AT THE DETROIT THEATRES I
the front page to the same effect? i1--------- --
This is a substitute commonly recom- Coleglate FootWe P S TH EATERI ./
mended by many who argue against vr'exr
the publication' of anti-social news: Many popular Lafayette at Wayne cad. 1101o
merely to publish a short notice of the 'The Vagabond King "
facts and not vivid stories of the models in any Based on
crimes themselves, Featuring such o "IF I WERE KING"
stories may serve to warn the crim- t . fi e Nights, $i to $3; Sat. Mat., 75c to $.o

his typifies the attitude the
ewspaper editor must as-
onsidering this problem. In
e other existing conditions
nterests of the newspaper
mand consideration, he is
compromise in his de-

i

inal and increase the difficulty of
capturing him, or it may gratify his
unbalanced craving for notoriety and
urge him to further crimes."
GERMAN STUDENTS
VISIT UNIVERSITY
Representing the German StudentI
Cooperative association, whose central
office is located at Dresden, nine Ger-
men engineering studeints visited the
University Sunday and were conduct-
ed about the campus under the direc-
tion of Edward H. Kraus, dean of the
Summer session and dean of the Col-
lege of Pharmacy.
These students, who were admitted
for the period of two years by spe-
cial permission of the Department of
Labor and are at present working in
the Ford plant in Detroit, are part of
a group of 60 in this country who,
have come for the purpose of studying
American industrial methods. They
are located in several of the larger
industrial cities and also on farms in
the Middle West.

mxaier a.

q 'PtVVO

19-8 spike heels.

Our new winter hose have just
shades in thread silk. Also
wool sport hose for both men a
Snappy styles

Popular priced.
$ 4.98
arrived. Many beautiful dark
distinctive patterns in silk and
and women. 98c to $1.79.

S.98

in broad toed
oxfords for the
Young men.
Trat or blaek.

[ aI{NTELi E Nights - 75c to $1.50 j
BONSTELLE Mats. Tues., 'hurs. Sat
PLAYHOUSE 50c and 75c.
NOTg-If you ike good drama of love, cot-m
I dy and thrillsXlwe recommend
SEVENTH HEAVEN
LatSignedf
Te Bnsteite Playhouse.
iihts - - 50c0 to $3
GWed at.K Mat.K50c-t0 $2
Sat. Mat. - Soc to$2
Something new to Getroit. A New York,
Theatrm Guild succes
Garrick Gaities
An Intiate Mnicali Revue.
SHUI3E RT LA FAY ET TE
Lafayette at Shelby Street
Biggest Musical Hit on four continents.
CASTLES
IN THE AIR
With i'onald Brian, Roy Cropper,
Virgina O'Brn

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WOODWARD AND ADAMS
DETROIT

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Do not dread sending your fine lace,
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ling delicate fabrics carefully.
Pledge your support to us and let us
pledge our services to you.

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11

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FYFE'S
Winter Oxfords
for the College Nan
S TYLED to the minute, sturdily built, of selected
leathers by Master Shoemakers! ' These new winter
oxfords fully uphold a tradition of quality and value! This
is true of all shoes bearing the famous Fyfe trademark.
$10.00
Obtainable in A an A rbor Only at
thompson & Pitts
1107 South Untersity A benue

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