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November 10, 1926 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-10

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PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNES
N TLT

)AY, NOVEMBER 10, 192,

/°4 E E A1° VIIl pmI 2 r "n r'. -'TA ET T T A i .Te - l-T- I

UHIIATEPPAHES

STRONG PASSDEFEENSI
Buckeyes Possess Triple Air Tlireat
In Grim, Clarke, Eby, Well
And Marek
RECORD CROWD ASSURED
(By Associated Press)
CIIICACO, Nov. 9.-The lights that
hang in. Michigan's towers warn Ohio
State that the Wolverines arp coming
both by land and air.
For the first time this fall Michigan
is effectively combining a touted aerial
attack, a particularly timel.y occur-
rence on the eve of the contest in
which anything but a tie will elimi-
nate one of the three surviving Big
Ten contenders.
The Michigan coaches were well
pleased with the play which swept
through Wisconsin for a 37-0 victory
Saturday, and labored today with an
offense which they think will reach
its peak against the Buckeyes.
Ohio needls no signal lights, how-
ever, becavse Coach Jack Wilce watch-
e Michigan down the Badgers, and
went back to Columbus with vivid
recollections of the air game. The
Ohio State freshmen already were
schooled in Michigan pass formations,
but Wilce handed them a hatful more
and hurled them against his varsity
defense.
Backfield Strong Defensely
The Buckeye backfield is giving evi-
dence of defensive strength compara-
ble to the attack which has made the
Puckeyes the Big Ten sensation of
the fall, and a week-end respite has
worked against the offense going stale
for the big game.
COLUMBUS, 0., Nov. 9.-Perfection
of a pass defense such as that with
which last year's weak Ohio State
team practically nullified Michigan's
brilliant air attack, is one of the aims
of Coach Jack Wilce in the drivo down
the stretch for Saturday's game. That
there will be no one way traffic in the
air lines is another indication for Ohio
State's training grounds. Ohio's air
threat will be tripled, apparently with
Grim, Clarke, Eby, Marek and Bell
being polished for the passing trio.
Added deceptions will be followed by
calling Bell from his end position to
the backfield for he punts as well as
passes with facility.
Replacement of Mayer by Mackey
at guard is expected. Mackey's de-
fensive strength being likely to win
the post. Wilce is hoping that Mackey
does not repeat his last year stunt,,
that of breaking his leg a few days
before the Michigan game.
Seating strategists are having their
ining this week at the Ohio stadium.
Every available inch is being utilized
for temporary seats.
PRINCETON, N. J.--Touch footbali
has been organized at Princeton as an
intramural sport. In the various
leagues so far organlized a total of 32
teams are entered.

Lf T EAM BACKFIELD STRONG
BUT JONES MUST BOLSTER LINE

NA
CARDED FORSATURDAY
CA'
raidition ai FoesWill Met Each OtherIHarv
In Contests T'1 Be Played joine(
'throughoutI East Cree
ing t
ARMY WILL FACE IRISH tesc
to th
unive
(By Associated Press) I
Iwhen
NEW YORK, Nov. 9.-Led by w T
Army's unbeaten warriors of the pig- says
skin and moleskin, 15 formidable' foot-. grun
bail battalions of the East will un- jof th
. Th
limier heavy artillery on Saturday in b haii
of th

Ar .
rHLETIC RELATIONS BETWEEN
PRINCETON, HARVARD STRAINED U' RIISfljIU
GM Asaed Press) newed friendship and the announce-
MBRIDGIE, Mass., Nov. 9.-The ment that for the present at least, the
card Crimson undergraduate daily Crimson and the Tiger would not go. (By Associated Press)
d today with President John President Hibben Explains EAST LANSING, Mich., Nov. 9--
r Hibben of Princeton in attempt- President Hibben's pronouncement There are indications that when
v troubled wa- followed closely on unofficial disclaim- Michigan St Colleges ootalle
of pour cntuons ththsaie takes the field against the Haskell In-
reaten relations between the twoi ers at Harvard of faculty responsibil- dans a week from Saturday the Spar-
ersities on the gridiron and else- ity for the Lampoon's attack. tans will be engaging one of the most
Dr. Hibben refused to consider the powerful teams in the land.
e Daily Princetonian, however, incident in any other light than that So far the Indians have piled up a
that i' one of the parties is dis- of the work of an "irresponsible mn- tremendous scoring record. Let by a
tled, it is time for dissolution ority," and bespoke the hope that heavy line and a fast charging back-
e Big Three. nothing would happen to weaken the I field they are bidding for a new mod-
e Crimson today took cognizance j cordial relations achieved this year ern ligh scoring record.
e situation that was created by a I among the institutions by confer- With the Michigan State line .none
al issue of the Harvard Lampoon, ences. too strong this season, plenty of trou-
zniversity'scomic which met out- The Princetonian says: ble is anticipated in halting the In-
igersitys ry"If, as a few Harvard men would dians' onrushes. State has been with-
ing crowds from Saturday's, gamei
with a pointed attack on Prince- have us be eve, one of the parties out a defensive fullback who could
to the agreement is disgruntled, or for break up enemy plays and Haskell
ploring the Lampoon incident, any reason desires to get out, then it boasts a line that averages well over
Crimson declared that "for years is time for the dissolution of the Big 200 pounds, the heaviest State will
card has adopted a patronizing Three. Princeton by no means feels have faced this season.
ude toward Princeton culminat- it is necessary at further cost to its
n the obviously undiplomatic in- dignity to preserve the Big Three." Subscribe for the Michigan Dally.
t of the early fall when Prince-
w'as certainly treated in a cavalier 111111illtfitllllll 11l lIIIIIIE tl11 111illllllC ICll1
on by those in charge of athletics
arvard.
~ ernu'n"~ referecnpp w o1 Tt. IIT .....F

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the most extensive series of major en-
gagements this year.-
At least eight of these struggles will
involve foes of long standing. This
national interest will center in Army's
battle with Notre Dame at the Yan-
kee stadium, where two unbeateni
elevens will battle with championship
aspirations at stake.
ncient rivalries will be renewed
etween Princeton and Yale, HarvardI
and Brown, Colgate and Syr'acu~e,
Cornell and Dartmouth, Williams and
Amherst, Washington and Jefferson
and Pittsburigh, and Pennsylvania andi
Columbia.I
The battle of Princeton and Yale,
which may decide the Big Three
championship, brings together two of'
the most ancient foes of the gridiron.
With a triumph over Harvard last
week the Tigers today ruled slight
favorites to repeat their 1925 sweep
to titular honors. In the scale of tra-,
dition the Amherst-Williams engage-
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the u
here
ton.
Dey
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attitu
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Harvard's intention
ton from its footballF
to take on Michigan.
After Harvard's in
vealed a conferencec
of three universities
resulted in renewed
ment stands next to
ton melee.

Yale Backfield
Coach Tad Jones has the stronigest day by clawing te Harvard team to
backfield of any of the teams of the 1 a 12-0 defeat. Yale was defeated by
i Three in th four m nitur aryland but this, according to cri-

above, but the lack of an impregnable
forward wall prevents him from send-
ing a championship team into battle.
Captain Bunnell, at quarter, Noble
and Foote at the halves, and Kline
at fullback, are four versatile men
with plenty of speed and capabilities
for deceptive running. But Jones
lacks the necessary powerful line to
open up holes for these men as well
as to ramble through occasionally andj
stop the opposition.
The tackle positions have met with
ill luck through injuries. Vander-
grift, Ryan, and Richards, the three'
best tackles on the squad, have all
been out at some time or other, and
the first twb were both out at one
time for a short period.
Wortham and Flaherty, guards,
have also been trampled by their op-
ponents and are not in good physical
condition, while Fishwick, the star
end, was also injured recently. Dick
Sturhahn, center, seems to have been
the only one capable of dodging the1
jinx, and Yale rooters fear that the
ill omens may pursue him, too, before
the season' ends.
Princeton upset all the dope Satur-

tics, may regarded as a trick of stra-
tegy by Tad Jones, coach, who with-
held his regulars from the contest.
That the line needs strengthening
was proved conclusively when Dart-
mouth, later beaten by Har-
Yard, and Brown scored touchdownsj
against the Bulldogs. On the other
hand, Yale failed to break down the
Brown defense due to the failure of
the Eli forward wall to break through
the line.
Harvard, after what seemed a sorry
showing against early opponents, took
definite shape and startled the sports
world by defeating the fast slipping
Dartmouth eleven, but after being
seemingly on the way to a real season
failed to come through at the most
crucial time.
Yale meets Princeton Saturday at:
Princeton, and a week later will play
Harvard at New Haven. Judging from
past performances it looks as though
the Eli are in for two losses unless
Jones opens up with all of the foot-
ball strategy that he knows.

DR. BERT JIABERER, 338F AYNARI) ST. PHW
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DR. DOROTHY SELLARDS
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ntention was re-
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