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November 10, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-11-10

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A

AGE FOUR
Published everyz
during the Univers
Control of Stude'
Alembers of
Association.

THF. MICHTIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1926

I

...........

morning except Monday
r year by the Board inS
?ublications.
.ern Conference Editoriala

The Associated Pigs is exclusively en-
id4toethe use for republication of all news
ci:pd tches credited to it 'or not otherwise
credited in this )er and the local rews pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
mnster General.
_ubscription by carrier, $3.75; by mail,
14.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial,. 4925; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
SMITH H. CADY, JR.
Editor..............W. Calvin Patterson
City Ed~itor.................Irwin A. Olian
News Edits......... .. Frederick Shillito
IPhilip C. Brooks
Women's Editor...............Marion Kubik
Sports Edit .. .......Wilton A. Simpson
Telegraph Editor............Morris Zwerdling
Music and Drama........Vincent C. Wall, Jr.
Night Editors"

Charles ilehyniet
Carlton Champe
Jo Chamberlin
JamesH erald
Assista
Carl Burger
Jose
M aron Anderson
Aiex Boch owski
t can CLaiPlelJ
Martin J.Colhn
Clarence Edelson
William EIsncry
o Friend
to )ert Gessuecr
IElaiie. (Cruber
Norton V Icove
Paul Kevin
S iin t a hDaume
1!vi <_< e e

Ellis Merry
Stanford N. Phelps
Courtland C. Smith
C .ssam A. Wilson
nt City Editors
henry Thurnau
ph Brunswick
Reporters
G. Thomas McKean
Adeline O'Brien
Kenneth Patrick
Morris Quinn
Sylvia Stone
James Sheehan
William Thurnau
M'Jilford Vanik
Herbert Vedder
N vaian W elles
Thaddeus Wasielewski
Sherwood Winslow

ment of Auguste Thyssen, German
steel czar who is visiting the indus-
trial plants of this country.
By combining the resources of each
signatory, the consortium aims for
greater efficiency in manufacturing
and distribution. Price inflation will
be precluded by the potential com-
petition of England and America. In
this connection, Herr Thyssen has al-
ready declared himself favorable to
the international conference suggested
by Judge Gary for "a fair understand-
ing" in the event that dangerous com-
petition become eminent..
PROHIBITION IN 192S
With the recent elections and the
wet-dry referenda showing the prac-
ticability of the prohibition question
as a political issue in some states,
Senators and Congressmen, mostly of
wet inclination, who are now in Wash-
ington, have predicted that modifica-
tion of the Volstead act will loom as a
big issue of the 1928 presidential cam-
paign.
In the East and Middle West par-
ticularly, the success of avowed wet
candidates, though assisted in some
cases by a split in the dry opposition
or by personal dislilee of the dry can-
didate, has indicated a strong senti-
ment for modification. As indicated
in other states, notably, Ohio and Cali-
fornia, however, this feeling is far
from unanimous. The large majority
secured by the drys in the latter com-
monwealth both on the referendum
and in the election of the legislature
and the governor is especially signi-
ficant in representing the attitude of
the West. i
Nevertheless, a vigorous campaign
by the wet forces in the choice of na-
tional convention delegates, partic-
ularly for the Democratic party in
case President Coolidge seeks another
term, would do much to bring signi-
ficance to prohibition as a nationa]
political issue.
'WATER STEAL' TRIAL
Refusal of Charles Evans Hughes
sitting as a special master of the
United States Supreme court, to dis
miss the action brought by most of th<
Great Lake states against Chicago am
its sanitary district for diversion o
lake water gave the former their firs
victory, axed allowed the arguments o
the respective parties to be con tnue(
before a court of justice.
Involving more than 60,000:000 peo
ple as well as an international aspec
derived from the interest of Canada
this case appears as an impressive
spectacle of arbitration over an issue
which in many parts of the worli
would cause war. Hope for a satis
factory settlement may be based upoi
the abundance of legal talent repre
sented which will compel examinatioi
of the question from all viewpoint;
and upon .the decision that evidenc(
will be accepted in the broadest way

QASED R!cL
ALUMNI
PREFER
BONDS
The Women's league is getting al-
to ether too excited abouttthissnew
building, and it is time that saner
and calmer minds endeavored to point
out some of thedangers ahead, and to
turn, their enthusiasm where it will
be more useful, as for example, the
ROLLS' stadium bond fund.
* * *
Girls, what will be your policies
after you get this building. Will you,
for instance, allow men in tea room?
* * *
If the Union, now partially support-
ed by co-ed partonage, is having a
hard time making the finances come
out right, how will it live when you

AND
DRAMA
TO IWII - i:3irk TI1wain's "1o1n of
Arc" with lladanme Clara Clentens in
Hill auditorim) at 8:15 o'clock.
TOINIicar~r : "Gentle men Prefer
Blonides" by Anita Loos anld John
Emerson in the Whitney theater at
8:15 o'clock.
JOHN VAN IDRUTEN
An interview, by Kenneth Patrick
Presenting what at first seemed to
be a rather artificial and frightened
appearance, but soon warming to his
listeners even as they responded to
him, a modest young man held an au-
dience in perfect attention yesterday

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
THOMAS D. OLMSTED, JR.
Advertising................Paul W. At.t1d
Advertising... ......William C. Pusch
Advertisinig.......... ,....Thomnas Sunderland
Advertising...........George H. Annable, Jr.
Circulation................T. Kenneth Haven
l'ulbiicatioii............. ...John H. Bobrink
Accounts ...............Francis A. Norquist
Assistants
George Ahn Jr. L. J. Van Tuyl
Melvin Il. Baer J. B. Wood
1). A. Brown Esther Booze
M]. 1. Cain Hilda Binzer
")anh-l Fiiley lDorothy Car penter
1B. 1 f Iandley Marion A. Daniel
A. i. Ilinkley Beatrice Greenberg
)?. L. lulse Selia M. Janson
'S. J2kcrbawy Marion Kerr
P.' A. Meyer Mt'arion L. Reading
I arvey Rosenblum Harriet C. Smith
tilliamV. Spencer Nance Solomon
I I[arvey Talcott Florence Widmaier

k

girls put up a rival institution?
? *afternoon in Natural Science audi-
Te DOWN. torium while he quickly and earnest-
Buying stadium bonds on the in- ly spoke of the intricacies of play-
stallment plan is now announced by writing. But slightly more interest-
the Athletic association. If they sell ing to those present were the chance
their bonds at the rapid pace they remarks dropped during the inter-
now are, a half-off sale will be in
order soon. course about the present season of
odrso.plays, actors and playwrights. In-
deed it was a wonder that the young
If they will let us pay 75c down professor of law was not swamped
and give several years to pay the with personal questioners when he
rest, we might invest what we concluded his remarks.
have raised so far for the ROLLS' Worthy of particular notice was his
stadium bond and let the interest opinion of Noel Coward, since be-
from the bond keep up the pay. tween the two there are many points d
ments in the future. of similarity-*at least as regards cir--
* * 0 cumstances. The author 'of "Young _
NO WORD FROM THE ADMIRAL Woodley" was forced by the ban of
When last seen Admiral Ixzo was the chamberlain to seek his recogni-
heading -across Lake Erie for Cleve- tion in America, even as Coward has
land on the back of his faithful horse, been silenced in those islands more
Wolverine, and dragging the buggy.I than once, until he no longer at-
Since that time police have been un- tempts to run the gauntlet of English
able to' locate him, and it is feared he censorship. Van Druten sees the au-
and the horse were drowned. Chicago thor of "The Vortex" as one who is
is to be asked to open wider her canalI brilliant in the extreme, but only in
gates and dry up Lake Erie in an ef- a contemporary way, as one who will
fort to discover him. recede in public notice with advanc-
* * * ing time unless he pay more atten-
tion to the choice of his subjects and
BOWLING GREEN OHIO, 4 P M material.
Nateria .
NOV. 9 NEmphasizing the fact that the one
ARRIVED HERE AT NOQN STOP thing which can be done to perfec-
WILL SPEND THE NIGHT HERE tion in the theater is character the
STOP OHIO NORMAL SCHOOL IS Englishman criticised such works as
LOCATED HERE STOP MORE GIRLS those of which Dreiser's "American
THAN VASSAR STOP AS SOON AS Tragedy" is an example, saying that!,
I SAW THEM I SAID TO OSCAR the stage is not the place for narra-
STOP STOP tive-especially such narrative. iHe
* * ' believes in the actor rather -than the
ACTION PICTURE play, and here may lie the reason forI
-' - the refusal of Glen Hunter-now the
star in "Young Woodley"-to assume
an important place in the cast of the
dramatization of the Dreiser novel.
Concluding with various comments
on the more familiar English dra-
matists and writers, among whom
were Galsworthy and Barrie, Van
Druten said that he did not consider
\ the stage in general to be advancing
along such newer pathways, but on
the contrary to be reverting to older
devices. He cited as an instance the
Left to right: typical Normal girl. play of Eugene O'Neill "The Great
Oscar. God Brown" in which ,the use of
BOWLING GREEN OHIO 11 PM masks was regarded as a great step
in advance. The mask served only
NOV 9 as the aside of the melodramatic vil-
OSCAR ALREADY A GREAT FAV- lain in the old days, lie said, and
ORITE WITH THE CO-EDS HERE was only one of the many examples
STOP NORMAL GIRLS LIKE HORS- of the prevailing impulse to return to
ES AND UNIVERSITY MEN STOP A the old ways with perhaps more em-
MIGHTY CHEER AROSE WHEN phasis on drama and character.
WE ENTERED DINING HALL HERE * * *
TONIGHT STOP THAT DID NOT " KAY!" AND OThER
SUBSIDE FOR TEN MINUTES STOP ENTERTAINMENT
BETTER CHEER THAN IXZO EVER On Monday night at the Imperial
HEARD AT VASSAR OR ANY theater a musical comedy with the
SCHOOL FOR THE FEEBLEMINDED English Gertrude Lawrence opened
STOP MECHANIC LOST STOP PRE- for what is expected to be the longest
SUMABLY CO-ED RESPONSIBLE run of any musical comedy of the
STOP OSCAR NOT SAFE FROM ,-a _ Tho tr o ha ni

!GRAHAIS M
BOOKSw
Travel - Poetry - Plays - Fiction - Biographies
A Very Complete Stock of the Latest and Best Books.
I'-
At Botha Ends of Th-e Dfaon4.1
SOMETHING NEW-GOOD TO EAT
JAPANESE
PERSIMMONS DANCING TONIGHT
Delicious when red ripe.
Prepaid Anywhere U. S. A. $2
BERKOWITZ CO. ChaMpaign.,I" and
7. }

0

MA N'S CjMAs
Style - Quality - Service
Save a Dollar or More at Our Factory
Hats Cleaned and Reblocked
Fine Work Only
Properly Cleaned - No Odor
No Gloss - No lurnca Sweats
Factory Hat Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415

p

i.

EVERY WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY, OR
SATURDAY
Hot Music by Jack Scott's
"WOLVERINES"
Convenient lobby, rest rooms, Check
rooms,. and fountain service.
GRANGER'S ACADEMY

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE
CAMPUS

SENIORS
Who have signed a $50 Life membership pledge
since entering the University, will receive $10 addi-
tional credit from this Fall's tuition, and may become
Life members at any time by paying the difference
Letween the amount already credited to their account
and $50;
Who are fully paid Life members will be re-
funded $10 from this Fall's tuition;
Who have not signed a Life membership pledge
will be given credit for a $10 initial payment toward
such a membership from this Fall's tuition and may
pay the balance at any time;
PROVIDED, the proposed amendments are
passed at the Union meeting, November 17.

(

Ilal Utley

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1926
Night FiMtor-COURTLANlI SMITH
REA )DYALE
Yale has bee :ten; not that that
is anything i. worthy, for Yale is
used to being b a n and Yale men have
boasted about teir indomitable spirit
for generations. But the defeat seems
to be different this time, for the!
alumni and ticket scalpers have risen
up in arms--and the great Yale spirit
seems to have gone the way of the
good football teams.
There wa a time when the great
sportsmanlike attitude of the now de-
funct three of eastern football was
traditional. Yale men were notably
good sports-they admitted it them-
solves-and to them a defeat was
nothing but a victory by a better
team, Now things seem to be
changed, however, and along with a
bitter and unedifying rivalry that has
developed between Harvard and
Princeton comes the unsportsmanlike
attitude of Yale at the conclusion of
the Maryland game.
Now Maryland has good teams. A
year ago they tied Yale; several years
ago they were beaten by a small mar-!
gin. Onec would think that there
would be no hard feeling at-losing a
game to such a school; but there is
where one wo d be wrong, for barely
had the game pssed into history when
Yale and its alumni were clamoring
for the removal of Jones, the head
coach.
Where is the spirit that was once
Yale? Where is the great sportsman-
like attitude that Yale bbasted when
the Big Three was really big? Have
our moss grown eastern counterparts
become poor sportsmen besides play-
ing poor football of late? One would
draw this conclusion from the present
attitude of the Yale alumni and stu-
dent body.
It is very true that the "Exclusive
Three" have no football teams, and
haven't had; but can one blame the
coach entirely for this fact. Perhaps,
the fault lies with the players them-
selves-perhaps they are playing for
self-glory, rather than for the glory
of Yale. Perhaps if the alumni would
attempt to find some football players,
rather than merely criticise their
coach ,things would work better.
It is good for false pride to have a
fall. It is well for the exclusive-and
one might add snobbish-eastern
schools that they do lose football
games once in a while. The noblest

TAKING TO THE AIR
With the announcement recently of
the inaugural of a national system of
air lines by the American Express
company, a progressive step is taken
in the development of the American
aircraft industry. The company pla s
to start two air lines by next April;
one from New York to Chicago and the
other from Chicago to Dallas, Texas.
Further lines will be added when the
need is felt.
The American Express company is
financially able to operate the new
system. It is not likely that it will
meet the fate of other commercial
air ventures of recent years. There
is a definite need of the new service
and it should prove profitable to its
sponsors. We may yet keep pace with
Europe's air development.

Whitney Theatre
Wed. Nov. 10th
of aughe/I
CUARIOLS COMEDY OF7T1 h eWORLU iSY.
NOTE--This is the Chicago Con-
PI ny and Ann Aibor is one of
the few smaller cities getting
th is a ttra ction . la 'I o rd e rs n o w.
Lower floor, $2.75
Balcony, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20
Enclose self--addressed stamiped
cuvelopo.

r

PHONE 8805
Let us solve your
printing problems
for you.
We will have it out

I

1:..__._ _v. _ .. I

when

promised,

and the work will
be done right.
GIVE US A TRIAL
The Craft Typeshop

son 1.Iley LIYu ae een aIU1
GAGGING THE PRESS THEM STOP LEAVING HERE EAR- mously successful; the cast besides
Past events have usually shown that I LY TOMORROW STOP OSCAR CON- the star includes Oscar Shaw and
when a government has abridged the FIDENT. Victor Moore; George Gershwin is re--
fredomof he res, te lgisatin ,KERNEL. sponsible for the music; Guy Bolton
has soon been repealed or the govern- * and P. G. Wodehouse wrote the book;I
ment itself thrown out of office. What TRAGEDY CLUB PRESENTS and Ira Gershwin did the lyrics. This
has happened in the past is likely to Dear Mr. Hay, combination must be nearly perfect.
occur again in Poland following the jWe take great pleasure in present- Gertrude Lawrence who clowned her
recent decree of Dictator Pilsudski ing you with two very complimentary way to the bright lights with Jack
gagging the press and violating a con- tickets to our latest production Buchanan and Beatrice Lille last year
stitutional provision. "Alumni Prefer Bonds." in "Charlot's Revue" is one of the
Three main offenses are listed in This play is noted for its raw real- best comediennes in the profession;
the decree. The first is the circulation ism and blinding pathos. It is pre- small twinkling eyes, black bobbed
of any printed news matter concerning sented after the style of Euripides' hair that can be worked into as many
the state which "would cause a public tragedies with achorus of funereal- effect as Elsie Janis' famous locks;
demonstration." The second is the robed students always in the back- amd a personality that has been tha
printing of speeches or even rumors ground. This play is Tragedy Club's feature of Mr. Charlot's entertain-
concerning members of the govern- first major production this year or ments for years,
w. 4. _---_ _-.--_,- any other . Incidentally Beatrice Lille's musical

READ THE AM4T AS

N

711 North University Ave.

Next to Arcade Theatre

lx - '1 2,1 wml

t : Y

J L

Michigan
OHIO

vs.

Columbus, November 13, 1926
cia Tri

HOCKING VALLEY TRAIN
eae i Ann Arbor ......... 7:00 A. 31. (E.T.) Nov. 13
Arrie Columbus:.........Ii:50 A. M. (E.T.) Nov. 13
L eave Colum bus.......... 7:00 P. M. (E.T.) Nov. 13
Arrh-c Ann Arbor.......11:50 P. I1. (E.T.) Nov. 13

N. Y. C. NIGHT TRAIN
Leave Ann Arbor......12:00 Midnight (E.T.) Nov.
Arrive Columbus........ :45 A. 31. (E.T.) Nov.
Leave Columbus.......12:00 Midnight (E.T.) Nov.
Arrive Ann Arbor........5:45 A. 3l. (E.T.) Nov.

1i
13
13
14

ment or judges, whether in ridicule or
criticism. The third offense is that of
publishing news matter considered
"derogatory" to government officials,
even through error. All these "of-
fenses" carry heavy fines or imprison-
ment and are to be enforced not by the
courts but by civil authorities.
Already the edict has met with aI
storm of criticism. Foreign corre-
spondents have called for an explana-
tion of the ambiguous decree and
newspapers have protested. The
documenthas especial significance,
coming as it does when discussion is

S. Thete.
ROLLS' CRIKE SERIES
Women in the tap room is another
crime on this campus.'
* . *4

I I I

Y

i
I

comedy now called "Oh, Please!"--
there is also a chance that it may be
called "Lily of the Valley"-opened
in Philadelphia the same night that
"Oh, Kay!" opened in New York. It
will probably play at the Fulton the-
ater while "The Donovan Affair" will
move to another house. There is an
additional possibility that the show
Imay stay on the road if the houses
are good. This is the policy that has{
made Mr. Frazee a millionaire with
road companies of "No, No, Nanette,"
and his later slow "Yes, Yes,NYvette,"
and it seems at present New York

ROLLS' STADIUM BOND FUND
NO BUSINESS YESTERDAY.
GRAND TOTAL.......$ .75
YET TO BE RAISED . . 499.25

to rip-$5
Those who desire to remaiin Columbus and return in
rigular trains Sunday, November 14th, round trip fare
will be $8.75.
ROUND TRIP PULLMAN FARES
Lower Berth, $7.5; Upper Berth, $6.00; Drawing Room, $27.00;
Compartment, $21.00; Seat Rate, $1.95
SECURE YOUR RAILROAD AND PULLMAN TICKETS NOW
--At-

i

* * *
Joan of Arc is in town tonight, and

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