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October 27, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-27

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PAGE FOUR

p

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WF~T~N~DAY, OC~OB~R 2? 1926 >.

lie tc fg n i 1

li

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated PAs is exclusively en-
itled to the use for republication of all news
oi1,atces ciedited to it or not otherwise
C"' 1,",1 i 'his paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
1 ihia ,er as second class matter. Special rate
~(;(stag;e granted by Third AssistantPst
i.os-en eral.
I.yU sarrier,$3.75; by mail,
Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
lird Street.
Ph oneC Editorial. 4925 ; business 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
~.;.,NAGING EDITOR
SMITH H." PADY, JR.
.... .W. Calvin Patterson
City Editor............. .. .Irwin A. Olian
News Editors.............Frederick Shillito
IPhilip C. Brooks
Women's Editor. - . --- ..- iM arion Kubik
>1,-a rts Editor.......... Wilton A. Sim son
f, r!..I.:..... ...... lorris1 , r in.
Music and Drama......Vincent C. Wall, Jr
Night Editors
Charles Behymet Ellis Merry
Carlton Champe Stanford N. Phelps
Jo Chamberlin Courtland C. Smith
~vacse Herald Cassam A. Wilson
Assistant City Editors
} ou as Doubleday Carl Burger

his inaugurating a wholesale removal
of postmasters in favor of members
of his political faith. It is unlikely,
however, that a Democrat would re-
vert to such drastic action, for both
parties realize that the personnel of
the postoffice department should be
chosen on ability alone, not on poli-
tical convictions.
There would seem to be no cause
for great alarm at the action of the
Supreme court, especially when con-
servative Chief Justice Taft sees no
harm in the decision.
GONE AT LAST
For years, the fraternities on the
campus have been hosts to many self
invited, and often undesirable guests.
at their house dances, particularly
during the football seasons. As long
as the attendance of "the campus"
added to the quality of the function
with but few unpleasantdconsequences,
the situation was regarded as at least
tolerable.
In recent times, however, it has
been demonstrated that the large
crowd resulting from the "open" par-
ty has made it hard to control, and
that any misconduct on the occasion
has generally been due to the unin-
vited guests. Last year, with the fra-
ternities given the option of announc-
ing their dances as "closed" or "open,"
it was found that the restricted func-
tion was much more satisfactory.
Consequently, the abolition of the
"open" fraternity dance by the Uni-
versity Committee on Student Affairs
followed as a natural and agreeable
sequel. .
As indicated by the success of the
voluntary measures last year this ac-
tion will undoubtedly eliminate the
unsatisfactory conditions in this phase
of the undergraduate social life. With
the presence of only undergraduate
and alumni members of the fraternity
and others who have been specifically
invited by written invitations, the fra-
ternity will be placed in a, seasonable
position of responsibility.
No longer will the published list of
the social events on any occasion be
a guide for the evening's social
itinerary for the adventuresome stu-
dents. And the only legitimate regret
will be that the University's action
could not have come sooner.

Marion Anderson
Alex Bochnowski
Jean ,ampbell
Martin .j,.Cohn
Windsor Davies
Clarence Edelson
'William Emery
'John Friend
Robes t Gessner
Elaine Gruber
Morton I. Icove
Paul Kern
Milton Kirshbaum
Irvin La Powe

Reporters
G. Thomas McKean
Adeline O'Brien
Kenneth Patrick
'Morris Quinn
Sylvia Stone
James Sheehan
Henry Thurnau
William Thurnau
Milford Vanik
Herbert Vedder
Marian Welles
Thaddeus Wasielewski
Sherwood Winslow
Thomas Winter

BUSINESS STAFI'
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
TrHOMAS D. OLMSTED, JR.
Advertising...............Paul W. Arnold
c, usting..........William C. Pusch
.d,(-tisinig.. .. . Thomas Suntlerland
Ad AAit.iln;.........George H. Annable, Jr.
- i... ..............T.Kenneth Haven
Publication......John H. Bobrink
.... irancis A. Norquist
Assistants
< F Yin.Jr. T. T. Greil, Jr.
ron A. M. Hinkley
t I (am E. L. Hulse
S ey arl S.. Kerbaury
'Marion Daniels, H. W. Rosenbium
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1926

Night Editor-J O' H. CHAMBERLIN[
USTING POSTMASTERS
A manifested in many quar-
A a :~.~the action of the United States
,uprcme Court in'upholding the power
Al A, Presikfnt to oust postmasters.
The ruling came as a result of the
'it' !lf ,' (A Frank S. Myers, Port-
Ind, (AA., 1 r ucover back pay for the
e I : 1;h ;,. (Apintment as Portland
S a e drA(lAowing his removal by
o .i'QA without a hearing.
(Aum '~a time when it is almost
o.'AA. 'iepted by politicians that
~APAA ~ and their assistants
nI ,: ',,- ;lated entirely by civil
e iegati2ns, the action may
< < FA~.' lain but surely not as
m the dissenting mem-
I; A _ ,'(k c t, Justice McReynolds,
m> (P,> - wihin he comments on the
+ - as1( *~ollows: "The very foun-
.i - of the government is gone.
N ~mu can tell just what are the
!f tce President and Con-
3m years it was understood
o(lice of. postmaster was a
p. :; 1 oh. The postmaster worked
A..m r (in 'politics, and his job
A n. ldUpon the success of his par-
A often, competent postmas-
. ro surrender their jobs to
A c .estionable ability when their
party suffered reverses. The depart-
ment did not thrive as it should under
this system.
There cane a time, however, when
c ;high up in politics recognized
!,.at people were demanding more and
nIore efficiency in mail delivery and
incidoneal service. A change in policy
was effected, partly due to common
agreement, partly due to law. Post-
masters had to secure their jobs
.-ughi the civil service. The matter
o presidential appointment and con-
maton by the Senate became large-
f ormality, except in regard to a
oA the greater postoffices of the
..untry...
T'd', Athe President, except in rare
* a . a'pioints or dismisses only at
the em< ion of the postofflice depart-
wh. There was no wholesale re-
moval of postmasters when the regime
* Pr.siident Wilson came to a close,
t' Pl1.sident Harding took office. It
iue that a few changes were made
nh larger postoffices for political
Iuro.es, but the great majority of
oa mters continued with their work
aneffected.
President Coolidge has worked in
cooperation with the postoffice depart-
ment in regard to civil service regula-

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
A VOICE FROM THE PAST
To The Editor:
On my return Sunday evening for
the three performances by the Rock-
ford Players of "Expressing Willie"
last night and today in our sentimen-
tal hunting-ground, the Mimes theater,
I was both surprised and pleased to
find a letter from one Willard Ren-
inger concerning the Music and Drama
eolumn and a mention of my own col-
ored days as its originator.
My connection with those hectic
years has fortunately come to a wel-
come end, although I am still living
down the fury of those alarums
and excursions. I certainly wish my
successor all the good will in the
world (he needs it), and breathe a
healthy sigh of relief that my interest
in criticism is now entirely from the
opposite end of the profession.
I know nothing surrounding the re-
cent articles on Frieda Hempel and
Barre Hill, but Mr. Reninger's attack
on my own criticism of Fritz Kreisler
is most amusing. It is masterfully put
and quite to the point save that I
never wrote a review of Kreisler in
my life....It so happend' that I have
heard him only once, and even then
back in the days when I was some-
thing like a freshman in high school.
The remembrance, however, is flat-
tering. Thus it is, I suppose, that
one's name peculiarly lives after one.
-Robert Henderson.
CRIMSON VERSUS CRIMSON,
To The Editor:
An announcement from Harvard has,
given a death blow to our fond hope
that our Wolverines would teach these
exclusive easterners our Western
brand of football next year. The rea-i
sox given was that Harvard had de-
eided to continue football relations
with Princeton.
But to and behold, next day we hear
that they have scheduled a game in
1927 with Indiana, proud holder of the
Big Ten cellar position.
The only conclusion that we could
get from this was that the "Dean of
Universities," had the will but not the
courage to attempt gridiron relations
with the "Champions of the West."
They decided that if they wanted to
win from a Big Ten team they had
better start at the bottom and work

WELL SAID!
Editor's Note: The following let-
ter addressed to The Editor was
accompanied by two clippings from
other papers. These are printed
below under the heading "Editorial
Comment." Such spirit as that
which is evidenced in the communi-
cation bears witness of a keen ap-
preciation on the part of the alumni
for the fine work -which is done
each year by the Varsity Band.
To The Editor:
Enclosed are two clippings, one
from the editorial page of the Grand
Rapids Evening Press and the other
from the sporting columns of the
Grand Rapids Herald. I believe these
sentiments aptly express the universal
opinion of all loyal supporters of
Michigan football teams. If it is true
that the council of administration of
a great conference university stated
that sending their band had no im-
portance in the winning of games, it
would seem to be an admission that
the "winning" of games was the major
factor rather than the fostering of
real amateurism as exemplified by the
following of "the team" to distant
points and cheering uner-grads,
loyal in defeat ' as well as victory.
Football season is when we renew
our allegiance to our school, and if
the glamour is to be worn down to the
mere playing of the game, we may
as well turn to the world series, or
Sundaying at a ball park to watch
Grange's Hyenas play Pyle's Kanga-
roos, or whatever they call those
teams.
No, Mr. Editor, by all means never
keep the band home, unless you want
to dampen the ardor of all football-
loving tax payers of our state, all the
Stadium Bond buyers and loyal alumni
generally. There are thousands of
us scattered about the country who
fervently hope that it may never be
said of Michigan that she kept her
band home because it didn't win foot-
ball games or because Michigan was
too cheap to send them. The "Victors"
has sent more students to Ann Arbor
than all her "victories." May we never
see a Michigan game played in any
part of the land without hearing the
booming "here they come" strains of
the grand old march before the team
comes on the field.
Let the yellow and blue capes con-
tinue to go streaming down the field
and may the baton always have a safe
journey over the cross bar.
-E. L. Cheyney.
EDITORIAL COMMENT
"THE STADIUM MARCH"
(Grand Rapids Evening Press)
Heralding in music the triumphs of
Michigan teams which have made fi-
nancially possible the great new sta-
dium where 1927's gridiron battles
are to be fought, a new "Stadium
March" has been added to the stirring
series which already blares out be-
tween halves and after touchdowns at
Ferry field. -.
Of all universities perhaps Michigan
is least in serious need of further at-
tention from composers and libret-
tists. Its great march, "The Victors,
is the envy of the collegiate universe.
It is played by bands great and little
throughout the world. Armies and
parades everywhere have marched to
its thrilling trumpet notes and sturdy
tramping rhythm. It is a march from
which triumph and pride shout their
messages; and if the new "Stadium
March'*has actually bettered it, then
the event is of importance to the mu

sical world. In addition, Michigan has
another swinging and catchy march
tune-"Varsity," with its spirited
rhyme of support to the team-"We're
for you, here for you to cheer for you.
We have no fear for you, O Varsity!'
Few college football songs run even
a close second to either of these.
Yet strange to say the most thrilling
part of all autumn afternoons at Ferry
field comes not as the band steps out
with "Victor" or "Varsity," but at the
moment when, heads bared and all
eyes on the baton, undergraduates and
alumni lower their voices in that tra-
ditional conspiracy of reverence which
comes at the lines about the "maid
with the golden hair and eyes that are
brimming with blue" in the third verse
of the song that goes to a rather me-
diocre tune called "The Yellow and
Blue." Time and memories have made
this highbrow old piece the very sym-
bol of Michigan loyalty. It has three
high notes that crack as many voices
as "The Star Spangled Banner," but
far more undergraduates know every
word of it than know the national
song.

THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ Re-
cital in Hill Auditorium, at 4:15
o'clock.
TONIGHT: IL. I. Frazee's "No, No,
Nanette!" in the Whitney theater, at
8:30 o'clock.
"EXPRESSING WILLIE"
A Review, by Marlan Welles
"Willie, you are wonderful!" breath-
ed Minnie as she pranced hysterically
about the bedroom in a simple blue
negligee. And Willie not quite know-
ing whether he was "God or a tad-!
pole" first swelled in the pride of
agreeing with the simple Minnie and
then grovelled in his fear that she
was not right. In short, Willie was
the characteristic young and very new
millionaire, beset on all sides by those
who by spouting a deluge of senti-
mental pleonasms, sought to attach
themselves to his menage. It was a
stock situationfor the stage, set in
the midst of the Freudian epidemic
which swept the country some two
years ago-but it was most effective.
In the hands of the Rockford Players,
Freud, "expression," Willie and even
the stumbling Minnie became glorious
comedy-American comedy of man-
ners
And that expresses the entertain-
ment as far as the play itself was con-
cerned. It was not what could be
called sparkling, it was not powerful.
The best dialogue in the whole play
came in the last act between the puri-
tanical little mother and the ultra-
expressionists. Frances Bavier, as
'the little mother helped that along,
too. She seemed fully fifty years old
and born of the "old" stock-a fine
impersonation. She became such a
strong character that we were con-
scious of waiting for her last appear-
ance, we wanted to witness the in-
evitable clash of natures.
The best judge of the play is its
audience and the response which fol-
lowed "Expressing Willie" indicates
our own judgment, that Amy Loomis
" as Minnie, and Robert Henderson as
Willie as well as Reynolds Evans as
Taliaferro succeeded in "expressing"
themselves admirably. And the mus-
tache was simply ravishing!
* * S
THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University organ-
ist will give the following program at
the Twilight Organ Recital in Hill
auditorium, Wednesday afternoon, at
4:15 o'clock.
Concert Overture........... Maitland
Hymn to the Sun "Le Coq d' Or" .
.................Rimsky-Korsakoff
Fantasie.....................Bubeck
Lento ("Orpheus") ...........Gluck
GavotteM....................artini
Prelude and Fugue in E minor (the
"Cathedral") ................Bach
Allegretto (Mood Fantasy) ..Rowley
Elizabeth's Prayer ("Tannhauser")
...........................W agner
March ("Tannhauser") ........Wagner
This program while ignoring the
moderns does not confine Mr. Chris-
tian to the strictly conventional. The
Martini Gavotte contains graceful,
simple melody vastly different from
his heavy, sonorous compositions
- usually for the Mass; the Bach Pre-
- lude and Fugue in E minor is a beauti-
ful example of contrapuntal writing,
and is immensely popular on concert
,programs; the Hymn to the Sun, by
Rimsky-Korsakoff is one of the most
popular from "Le Coq d'Or"; and the
Wagnerian selections, while typically
of this composer are not the most
commonly given.
THE YPSILANTI PLAYERS
The Ypsilanti Players will open their
twelfth season tonight with a pre-
sentation of Goldon's "The Liar" in
the Players' Playhouse at 8:15 o'clock.
, Followingthe policy of previous years,
the dress rehearsal was given Mon-
A day night for active members, while
l ast night the play opened with a pre-
sentation to the subscribing and sus-
, taimng members. The play will con-

tinue through next Wednesday night.
"The Liar" which is a three act
comedy was staged by D. de V. Dit-
'wiler, who last year was associated
1 with the Stagers in New York, while
the direction was by Daniel L. Quirk,
Jr. The doors are open at 7:30 o'clock
1 and no seats are reserved.
The work of the players, who will
~present five complete programs
throughout the year is entirely praise-
worthy; their merit has received more
than local prominence, and has been
commented upon favorably in several
theatrical magazines. The atmosphere
of the Little Theater is emphasized in
their work; and their productions are
chosen with a view of presenting the
type of show that cannot be given by
lIlarger groups.

BONSTELLE Nights -75c to $1.50
UNS L ats. Tes.,'hurs. Sat.,
PLAYHOUSE s c and .5C t
By James Forbes, Author of
"THE (HORUS LADY"
"YOUNG BLOOD"
In Which Helen Hayes, Florence
Eldridge, Norman Trevor and Ernc
Dressler Were Featured at the Ritz'
'Theatre, N. Y.
MAKE
IMAN'S CI4m
Style - Quality - Service
Save a Dollar or More at Our Factory
Hats Cleaned and Reblocked
Fine Work Only
Properly Cleaned - No Odor
No Gloss - No Burnea Sweats
Factory Hat Store
617 Packard St. Phone 7415
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State)
A FREE TRIP
TO EUROPE
The leading student tour organiza-
tion of America desires an agent on
this campus for the sale of its student
tours. Must be influential at school
and have good personality.
The person appointed will be sub-
stantially aided by literature, adver-
tising, etc., and have opportunityof
joiningour permanent staff after
graduation.
Write fully to
MISS ROSALIE WEILL

Dance Engagements for
Navy-Game Week End
One or two of our orchestras have open

dates for the coming week-end.

If you

need dance music, 'phone for additional
information.
GRANGER'S ACADEMY

M MUSIC
RAN]
D RA MA

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i ltlltt 11111l l 111lll l ttl ttliililliiiilitttttttit l iltll fltttitltitltt111tttttliiliUiiiliilit
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sr And -* u
us
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At Both Ends of
LJI&4b&415' SThe Diagonal
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1-2 STATE SAVINGS BANK BLDG. PHONE 80<06
DR. W. S. MILLS, 616 FIRST NAT. BANK BLDG. .
PHONE, OFFICE 8308, RESIDENCE 5306
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1111 FAIR OAKS PARKWAY. PHONE 540

-...

2929 Broadway

New York City

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PLEASE
DON 'T
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of a TRUE ENGLISH
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COLUMBIA
the newest and latest
achievement
in tone productionT
"LIKE LIFE ITSELF"
Hear them play our hatest hits
at 305 Maynard St.
Alniendinger's Muskc Shop

Y

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TONIGHT
HEAR.THEM SUNG
SEE THEM DANCED
H.H.FRANZaEE
ROUYND-TME -WORLD MI1CAL COMEDY

OUR REPUTATIO'0N
Is known to everyone in Ann
Arbor.
Drop in and let us prove
that our fountain specialties,
and our malted milks in par-
ticular, are everything that
you have heard about them.
The chocolate used is the
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CRIPIPEN'S-

EXCUSE TO SMILE

up. (Grand Rapids Herald)
It is my belief that they made a big Word that the University of Illinois
mistake. If Michigan defeated them council of administration has denied1

Another reason given for the re-
fusal is that bands do not have any
importance in the winning of games.
The Conference recently made some
rulings tended to frown upon large

i 9

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