100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 16, 1926 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OCTOBER 16, 1-92

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

STE s TO HERB'
OR, PATTO N SPEAK

GR

?ADES LOWER
THAN IN 1913,
FIG URES SHOW

0

I

5

I

thicago Theoogiuan' T*ou Ve "Whiaf'
In It For M" fie"A Subject For
onT c ato Talk
CAVANAUGHTO PRESIDE
"What'' In It For Me?" is the sub-
ject whi f Dr. Carl Safford Patton
has selected for his address at the
second student convocation of the fall
series tomorrow morning in Hill audi-
torium. Dr. Patton is at present a
'membM' of the faculty of the Chicago
Theological seminary, and is particu-
larly well known in this city where
he was pastor of the First Congrega-
tional church for ten years.
Besides having occupied the pulpit
for several years in Congregational
churches in Ann Arbor, Auburn, Me.,
Columbus, 0., and Los Angeles, Dr.
Patton has lectured extensively. He
"has given numerous sermons at Smith
and Vassar clleges in the East, and
throughout California. A graduate of
Oberlin and Andover Theological
seminary, he received his Ph. D. de-
'gree at the University in 1913. Dr.
Patton has also written a number of
books.
The service will open at 11 o'clock
tomorrow, as usual. Thomas Cavan-
augh, '27L, president of the Student
council, will preside. Otto Koch, '27
S. of M. will be the soloist, and Dalies
Frantz will be at the organ again.
Dr. Patton will arrive in Ann Arbor
this afternoon. He will be the guest
of Shirley Smith, secretary of the Uni-
versity, during his brief stay here.
INTDIRIGIBLE
HEADEDEASTWARD
MAINTAINS GOOD SPEED
(By Associated Press)
CLEVELAND, Oct. 15.-The giant
navy dirigible Los Angeles was speed-
ing over Lake Erie tonight while the
men on board enjoyed a fried chicken
dinner. The ship reported air condi-
tions favorable and that if the present
rate of speed was maintained it would
reach Buffalo about 9:30 o'clock to-
night.
The Associated Press tonight re-
ceived the following message from the
Navy dirigible Los Angeles via the
Inter City Radio Telegraph company.
"After taking off from the elabor-
ate Ford airport mast, we circled De-
troit and the mast and followed the
international boundary line through
Lake Erie.
"Windo aPe .favorabl and we are
now making about 70 miles an hour
over the ground. At present. rate
should reach Buffalo about 9:30
o'clock tonight. Everything on board
functioning satisfactorily.
"During our stay at Dearborn, Mr.
Henry Ford and Mayor Smith of De-
troit were prominent visitors among
many others.
"We are now enjoying an excellent
fried chicken dinner.
"Everyone treated the Los Angeles
crew royally.
"The air is very smooth and our
trip promises to be a smooth one.
"Admiral Moffett disembarked at
Dearborn and will probably attend the
dedication of Lansdowne Field at
Youngstown Saturday."
The message was signed, "N-E-R-N"
the radio call of the Los Angeles.
INITIATE SENIORS
TO HONOR GROUP
Alpha Omega Alpha, honorary med-
ical fraternity, elected seven medical
seniors to membership last night at
its annual fall election of new mem-
bers. Those voted to membership
were Christel A. Hiss, Selma Mueller,
C. C. McCrae, R. W. Teed, T. L. Parry,
A. D. Seybold, and G. T. Brown.
The initiation banquet was an-
nounced for Oct. 19 at which Dr. Wil-

HamsDarrach, dean of the College of
Physicans and Surgeons, Columbia
university, will be the guest of honor.
Following the'banquet Dr. Darrach
will speak in NaturalScience audi-
torium on "Why Study Medicine."
This lecture will be open to the public
and is the first scheduled Alpha Ome-
ga Alpha lecture of the year.
ELECT PRESIDENT
OF LAWCOUNCIL
James Boyle, '27L, was chosen
president of the college council of the
Law school 'yesterday at a meeting of
the council representatives who were
elected to office last spring. Boyle
automatically, becomes an ex-officio
member of the general Student coun-
cil.
With the organization of the Law
council only those in the Medical
school and' engineering college re-
main to be formed. The literary and
dental councils were organized sev-
eral days ago.
CLASPE RECEIVES
SECTIONAL PRIZE

li

Judging from the number of "A"
and "B" marks given by professors in
1925-1926 compared with those given
in 1912-1913, the relative chance of a
student's obtaining a high mark is
rapidly diminishing, according to fig-
ures shown yesterday by University
authorities. The figures were com-
piled for the literary college only.
Of courses given in 1912 and 1926,
23 were selected at random for a basis
of comparison. Of these 23 represen-
tative courses, there has been an aver-
age decrease in 16 courses, in the
number of "A" marks given, of four
and one-half per cent. In but five
courses has there been any increase
in the number of "A" marks, two
courses awarding about the same
marks last year as in 1912. In 14
courses the number of "B" marks
given was six per cent less last year
than in 1912. And in practically
every course of the representative
23 the number of "C" marks given out
was higher last year than in 1912.
The five courses of the 23 in which
any increase in the number of "A"
marks given out was noted were those
in French, Spanish, fine arts, biology,,
and German. The grades of the
rhetoric and mathematics depart-
ments were practically the same last!
year as in 1912.I
As a whole, courses showed generali
decreases in the number of "A" and
"B" grades given, and slight increases
in the number of "C" marks.
DECORATE UNION
IN SPORT MOTIF
Arrangements for the Union dance
tonight will provide an appropriate
football setting in harmony with this
afternoon's game. Pennants, foot-
balls, megaphones, "The Little Brown
Jug," and similar decorations will be
used.
Refreshments for the Friday and
Saturday night dances at the Union
will be served in the ladies' dining
room, it was announced yesterday by
the chairman of the Union ballroom
committee. A complete service, from
10 to 12 o'clock on Fridays and from
10 to 1 o'clock on Saturdays, in the
ladies' dining room, wilt replace the
former soda fountain on the ballroom
floor. Women will also use the check}
room on the second floor for wraps:
The ticket preference announced
recently for seniors in all colleges
applies only to dances given during
the football season.

11

Mtsd the b~eautyj of the Scarlet Tanager
Nmme resthe
Wih a sin e f
Colo
Ha Tae Signe
That equals how many
pages of lecture notes?
JUST as that "second wind"
puts over the ball for a touch
down, or gives a runner that
freshburstofspeedthatwinson
the home stretch, so Duofold's
Over-size Ink Capacity tides
men over extra pages or extra
days of work. It's the "second
wind"ofwriting.Forexample:
An executive of the Public
Securities Corporation, Los
Angeles, filled his Duofold in
the regulation way and then
signed his name to 1067checks
inan hbur and 30minutes with-
out refilling his pen.
Togetfulllecture notespass
atestontime,andfeelthethrill
of a balanced man-size grip -
get this black-tipped lacquer-
red beauty. Its jewel-smooth
point,fif not mistreated,is guar-
anteedfor25 years.
THE PARKER PEN COMPANY
ParkerDuofold Penc to atch e pen, $3.50
factory ind General Offices
JANESVILLE, WIS.
DuofoldeJr. $5 Lady Duofold 5
sameexcetorsime Withringerchateain

M.VUMSl
lj
4-v

LIBERTY, Mo. - An undertaker's! OKLAHOMA CITY. - Elias Funk,
name on a football uniform delayed a star outfielder of the Oklahoma City
football game here when a member Western league club, has been sold to
of Liberty's Negro team refused to the New York Yankees. Funk led the
play with "Licensed Embalmer" writ- league in base stealing last season
ten on his back. and had a batting average of .339.
i z O O O ~ ~ C ~ 3 3

MUMS have become more
than a custom at the Michigan
football games - they are a
tradition.
This year more than ever they
will be worn both before and
after the game -as well as in
the stadium.
Our large stock of mums and
flowers of all kinds ins'ures you
getting the best.

ti
1
t
ti1
ti
1
ti
'
.
'.
ti
ti1
+o

11

Anti Arbor Floral Co.

112 East Liberty St.

Phone 6215

IN'bo-O.-Cm

Subscribe for1

the Michigan Daily.

Patronize Daily Advertisers.

MMA

Footba I

I

Games Satisfy Both

I

PLAYM ERSAND SPECTATORS
Likewise, our Laundry ser-
vice is such that any" one
of the players or .any one
of the spectators would be
satisfied with it

Th

Trojan

Laundry,

Phone 9115

514 E. William St.

m

- m

I A

1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan