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October 16, 1926 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-10-16

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

SATURDAY. OC:TORFR IA, 1q2tv

HF MTT I-fly STY ATP~A iOr~iipI

,.~, '..' S SJttt*J. .LjJ,

Ha ~ill ./dd s.T cG e1i cl ca~l Survey f,
onditions At Haiti And. Other' Islands ;1
t _____-Pack pAll MyCaresan
;suppleenting the geographic sur- population of about 9,000, in compari- =1
vey of Haiti begun during the' summer son to Martinique's 190,000. Little is = h a
of 1925, Robert B. Hall, of the geo- iknwabuthisndsyevn
graphy department, returned to theknw aotthilndsyevn-
Republic of Haiti during the summer b h epl fHiidet t
to continue his research work as aI natural inaccessibility. Border ing the j I'm on may way to
guest of the Navy department. The !coast is an almost impenetrable
greater part of the summer was spent fringe of dense mangrove.' Behind
by Mr. Hall in making a geographicalc this mangrove swamp is a broad sa-IM
line mnud flat which extends inland =T S '
reconnaissance of the neighboringgvngrstoocyilsoeedwh-
sisands a dyt lyUingv e pen encesas thorn forest and underbrush: Thie in- -
slatd b th Uniersty.tenio highlands are the most suitable =
Mr.Hal asgrnte te seofth agricultural areas and support the -a
"Eclarier," a small ship, and incident- bunt1 of the population. "The native",
ally the flagship of the Haitian fleet,heereatrigeamlofpnerI R d
in which they made the two-week frontier, life," 'Hall remarked. "They he D iy " ls fid Z urn
stopover cruise around the southern! have an agricultural organization and
peninsula, exploring the islands of ;tl~a~so iigfriiavneb
Grane Cymie ad Ile Vaheandmost sections of the mainland. Their
reaching many inland points on the extensive,' well cultivated gardens
peninsula hardly accessible by land! keep them amply fed, and their larger
travel.
thatched houses are a distinct con-
Grande Caymite is a low limestone tract to the miniature garden methods
island having a Negro population of and smaller homes of the rural in-
about 3,000, who make a living by habitants of the Haitian mainland."
combined fishing and farming. The: "The chief handicap faced by the
limestone, composing nearly all of the! people" of L1a Gonave :is'tlhe scarcity of
surface rock, is pitted with small water, due to the surface'rock forma-
holes which are filled with water most tion of the island. The entire island
of the year and provide an excellent ( is composed of porous' limestone, hlay-
breeding place for mosquitos. During ing no surface streamis and only a few
the rainy season the mosquitos be- springs. Water holes must be relied
come unbearable, and practically the upon entirely in many' parts of . thee
entire population suffers from ma- island, and these usually go dry duri-
laria. "No form of taxation exists fing the dry season. ' It is not 'unusual
here," Hall said, "and immigrants , to see people travel' as far as. ten
from many of the West Indian island, miles for water. The 'woim-en carry_
have settled there on that account,I the' water home on their heads' in
in spite of the mosquitos and poor large gourds; which hold about a gal-
general health conditions." Ilon.' The distrfbutloh 'of population
The Isle a Vache, south of the is 'determined'' bg the'' location of
peninsula, also has a Negro popula-' springs, as there are no wells. '
tioii of approximately 3,000, and is a These natural obstacles have effec-
similarly unhealthy place. The sus- tively 'retarded attempts at coloniza-,
tendhee of the inhabitants along the lion during the past centuries.' Al-
coastal settlements is derived from ! though no definite'relics of proof have
fishing and agriculture, 'while cattle !Yet 'been found,'the' island was 'prob-
raising plays an important part in 'the ably first settled biy Indianis who fled
Interior grasslands. A small amount, from the Spaniards at the time of'thelr
of lignumn vitae is also cut and sold occupation' of Haiti. Djuring the co-
or traded to merchants on the main- lonial period of Atnerican istory the
land. French left the island untouched, and
"The boat dropped us about five it became a. refuge for riiaWay
miles from shore," H-all continued, slaves tanfd fugitives fromi justice. The
describing his experiences, "and we " Haitian governmenit is' 16w concerned
threaded our way over the surround- jini 'the solution of their hygienic and
ing coral reefs rowing ab~out four? economic' problems, as well' as the.
hours in a small row-boat, until we colonization of the island by the grant
reached the north shore of the island. of. a land concession.
We made the trip into the interior'
on foot, as no horses or burrows'Subscribe for the Michigan Daily.
could be secured, but the guide hesi-, :

! _
{:

Luncheon ,
11:00-1-~
Afternoon Tea
3 :tK- i:30
Dinner
5:30~-i :30
Sunday 1Dinner
1 :00-2 :30
221 S. State St. Pial 98i

TWO Words~
1 an the Whd1e Family,
Saves Money!t

t

'v

S
1w.ry DReAiuilk Represensta **
w~ais this gold

It's easy to save nineoxn silk hosiery,
lingerie, children's stocitings and men's
sock if you will just day "Come In"
to the Realsilk Service Representatiye
when he calls at your home. Simply
'pone and a corgveniemt appointment
will be rrangec4.
RJ&ALSJLr HOSIERY MILLS
A## Arhp r "lrwich
2(19 S. State St. Dial 9, 5.2

I

..denuikaziouit'bugtooi

Monona"

- -.....,, . e.":....-.-._. ..
.. ._ . . .,. .___ . - - 4... , .
_- _ __. _ . __ . _._ . .'... , I

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.taU 4a atLthe zta, Uof goig tooLtar in 4
land, as the island has established rentals
an unsavory cannibalistic reputation.: See the New
The natives proved, however, to be of
much the same tyeathsInHi. Model
They stared at us mistrustfully, as Corona
most of them had never before seen ia
white men." a
La Gonave, the third main objective!
of Mr. Hall's research, lies approxi- Rider's Pen Sbop
mately 35 miles northwest of Port au (
Prince. It is almost as large as the, re.paIr"Ing f
French island of Martinique, having a

TO YOU -Coach

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In Appreciation of Your Long Service a,& a Buid&er ol Meia;
and in Recognition, of Your Successful and, Sportsxnanlike
Leadership in the Making of Football, History in Michigan
CongrateI dons
Orn Reaching the. Goal of a
Quarter Century of Service to7 the'
Urnier'sity of Michigcvn

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Do you remember that first game with Albion
College in. 1901? Do. you. remember how you let,
the "big fellow, Willie Hleston, into the last half?
and how.he covered. himself 'With glory in his
first game for Michigan.?-
Just the other day, under the caption, of, "Twenty-
five Years AgoToday", somrreone re-told that story.
Arreporter.happened into Mr. Heston's down-
town office. 14e found. the ruddy faced dean of
football stars at his desk, reading the story. The
"big, fellow'; was almost in tears. And with a.
voice. that quavered, just:a little, he spoke this
tribute: 4TI'm not ordinarily swayed by sentiment,
but when, I read: this thng emotions came, over
me that almost choked me.' It. brought back those
fuemories of Yost, of the, oldestadium, the battles
in mud and, gore-and. glory. I'm older no w and
SatulrdaY, October

away from such. thinks utImhappter im
memories than I, was t en. in the' read:ities."
Your. friends are. mindMu, Mr. Yost,cif, the fact
that it, is just twenty-five years ago this f 4~ since-
you caeto the canapes ofou.bloedUnvesiyx
of Michig a . Football history, fame: andl success::
have been wvritten large sinc'e then aof proof, of:
your capable leadersh i .
But great as have .been your achieverment in dhe
realm of the gr di'on, i. cei yqur in luetwe. in tlw
lives of Michiga n men, yout ideals of Qthics in,
sportsmlanship, anid .yol,1?aotributi(pns to inter-
co'llegiatc athletics. that have woen. O you the
admiration and ,frienl hip of' millipn.
It 13 a privilege to p blish-v t ilittle to lut oQ
behalf of your frie ds o( v Whom yo~cit~quarter:
ceMury of serNice illed lwith Significance.

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