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May 14, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-14

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PAGE PFOUR t1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,.MAY 14, 192G

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Boat In
Control of Student Publications.
A.embers of Western Conterence Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
tisbed therein.

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Entered at the postaffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
sf' postage granted' by Third Assistant. Post-
miaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ana Arbor Press Building, May-
ward Street.
Phones: Editorisi, es4 ; basises, 1124.
DITOluIL 5TAFI
Telephone O
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Tha
News Editor..........Manning Housewortb
iWomen's Editor............ Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor.............oseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........William Walthour
Music and Drama.......Robert B. Henderson
' Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Thomas V. Koykka W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

rest of the year there is little vaca-
tion business.
Now comes the plan of Edward A.
Felene, Boston merchant and philan
thropist, which would make possible
low-priced vacations in Europe dur-
ing the "off-seasons"-spring and fall.
With the cooperation of the transit
and hotel companies, and of American
employerscand organizations, it is be-
lieved that trips abroad can be ar-
ranged at 'rates one-third below the
regular summer prices, or about $200
for two weeks.
The steamship lines, hotels, and
railroads would be creating for them-
selves a market where one never ex-
isted before, and could afford to make
Teductions in prices. These com-
panies are now considering the pro-
ject, and, according to Mr. Filene,
there will be announcements in a few
weeks of trips scheduled for next fall.
The aid of American business men?
is sought in order that vacations for
those employees who wish to take
the trips may be arranged far the
fall and spring.
The advantages of travel abroad
cannot be over-emphasized, and thed
bringing of that privilege within the
ordinary man's income is a big step
forward. One by one th "luxuries"
of yesterday are becoming the ne-
cessities of today.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications ill be
disregarded. The names of c mmuni-
cants will, however, be regaded' as
confidential upon request.

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Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
George Berneike
William Breyer
Pilip C. Brooks
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
Ciileton Champs
Douglas Doubledsy
Eugene H. Gutelunst
fames T. Herald
Russell Hitt
Miles Kimball
Mlarion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy e orehouti
Margaret Parker
Archie Robinson'
Simon Rosenbaumn
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter

AND)
DRAM

j

It is with much gratification in
many and devious ways that we set
down these last few lines, in which
we bid our beloved public a tearful
and joyful farewell, and introduce
our successor, who no doubt, is fa-
miliar to the reading public long ere
now, as an ardent and brilliant con-
tributor, as well as diligent member
of the staff of this department, which
now joins history.
It seems we have not been given to
enough reminiscing, and bemoan-
ing of the fact that we were nearing
our end. The fact that the great po-
litical wave which annually sweeps
over our community had the campus
in its grip, so absorbed our attention
that we quite forgot our fast ap-
proaching end.
Be that as it may, it has arrived,
and it is with a feeling of great con-
fidence and equal expectancy that we
introduce Mr. Timothy Hay, as the
new Managing Editor of this depart-
ment. Of his ability there is little
we can say, since he has spoken, oz
better, written for himself. Our only
hope for him in the coming year is
that he derives as much pleasure
from his tenacy of office as we did,
and that he do a much better job.
And we are quite sure he will.
Sir Toby Tiffin.
* * *
This taking over the column isn't
so funny, as you will also discover
in the time to come. There is one
ray of hope that wve can hold out:
Sir Toby has promised to write for
us. Then, too, there are some other
contributors that we hope to line up.
Now, when something important
changes managements, like when a
new prime minister takes over the
running of the King of England, it is
necessary that an announcement of
policy be made.
Therefore, we must announce ours,
not that it means anything.
(1) We will not take any cracks
at the .Music and Drania column.
(2) Nor at any otlier comics.
(1) This column wvill always be
nictivated by 1i1gh and mighty ideals;
we will strive for the best interests
of the campus, especially along the
line of Iaging an extensive editorial
battle with Chimes.
* * *
BRITISH STRIKE CALLED OFF AS

TONIGHT: Bernard Shaw's "Salit
Joan" In the Whitney theater at S
o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Students' Recital
in the School of Music auditorium at
8 o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Senior Class of the
Ann Arbor high sdtool present "The
Chinese Lantern" in PatteigIll audi-
torium at 8:15 o'clock.
* * *
(Editor's Note: The following Mu-
sic and Drama column has been writ-
ten and edited by Vincent Wall.)
** *
THE GREEN LOLLIPOP 1
There is a tradition in the musical
world, somewhere, that Richard
Crooks is the one perfect tenor-
perfect in tone, breath and poise-
even Mr. Gabrilowitch himself says
so. And if this be so, at least he has
attained that honor while he ranks as
one of the youngest although one of
the best tenors in the trade.
Perhaps it is due to his remarkable
sense of rhythm; perhaps it is due to
his brilliant technic and absolute
mastery of that powerful voice wbihh
is, so they say, like a green lollipop?
In any event he has, since the age of
12, when he shared honors with
Schumann-Heink before an audience
of 14,000 been cne of the most
prophecied about young men in all
musical columns.

HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR-
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Phone 8040 Cor, N. Univ. & Thayer

F fConsult us on Fine Engraving. It
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GRAHAM'S BOOK STORES
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BUSINESS STAF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising.. "". ....".......Joseph . Flnn
Advertising............Rudolph Rotelman
Advertising ............... .Wi. L. Mullin
Advertising........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation................James R. DePuy
Publication .............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Account.............a...Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
George H. Annable, Jr. Prank Mosher
W. Carl Bauer F. A. Noruist
John H1. Bobrink Loleta G. Parker
Stanley S. Coddington David Perrot
W. J. Cox Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Wm. C. Punch
Mary Flinterman Nance Solomon
Stan Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
T. Kenneth Have Wm. J. Weinman
Harold Holmes Margaret Smith
Oscar A. Jose Sidney Wilson
FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1926
Night Editor-COURTLAND SMITH
THE HAND THAT FEEDS
Ann Arbor as a town is practically
nil. It is a good place to live, but a
poor place to make a living. That is,
the Ann Arbor exclusive of the Uni-
veisity.
Whatever Ann Arbor is, it owes to
the University. The University an-
nually draws to this locale thousands
of students and tens of thousands of
visitors. These people bring with
them buying power, and they exer-
cise it. Thus Ann Arbor has become
outstanding prosperous for a muni-
cipality of its size and industrial ad-
vantages.
Ann Arbor has become increasingly
prosperous because of her treatment
of these University-drawn spenders.
We would expect merchants and the
like to take advantage of their op-
portunities, it is good business, .and
hard to resist. But when the muni-
cipality itself, through its local gov-
ernment, insists on taking advantage
of students and students' friends,
then we find reason for surprise, and
perhaps even for objection.
The police department's annual
traflic violation drive has come to be
expected regularly every spring. And
just as regularly, the students have
learned to expect discrimination
against themselves. Of course the
number of student cars, especially in
the spring, may be appalling, and the
way some of them are driven may be
positively inane, but does that make
parking without lights by a student a
greater offense then when done by a
townsperson? Is it fair and equitable
to arrest students for parking more
than sixty minutes on an obscure side
street that has been cluttered with
police signs, and then smile and turn
away when townspeople park double
on one of the several more or less
busy streets of the village?
Perhaps, being a student, we are
prejudiced, but it doesn't seem as
though the people who depend upon
our monthly checks for their daily
bread and butter were being truly
appreciative.
"OFF-SEASON" TRAVEL
Seasonal demand is often the cause
of high prices in certain industries.
The public buys some articles, as
clothes, in regular set seasons only,

MEXICO AND RELIGION
To the Editor:
As an alumnus of the University,
perhaps you will permit me to com-
ment on the talk given in a Univer-
sity auditorium by a Dr. Osuna, who
is touring thescountry, speaking
chiefly in Protestant churches, in
which he said that the expulsion o
religions from Mexico was to prevent
the Catholic Church from seizing con-
trol of the state by some educational
scheme.
That specific accusation needs no
answer from me, because the burden
of proof is on Dr. Osuna, and the
facts do not bear him out, as any
competent historian or student of
Mexican affairs will admit.
Allow me, by way of indirect an-
swer to Dr. Osuna's attack on the
Catholic Church in Mexico, to make
the counter-accusation against the
Mexican administration: that it is en-
forcing anti-religious clauses of a
constitution, which are abhorrent to
the great mass of the people.
I quote from the following editorial
on this precise point, from the "Vigil"
of Grand Rapids, Michigan, which
also was 'reprinted in the "Lake Shore
Visitor" of Erie, Pa., the "Bulletin"
and the "Columbian" both of Cleve-
land, O., the "News" of Canton, 0.,
and the "Record" of Akron, O., and
perhaps other papers which have not
come to my attention.
"Hunian Liberty Everywhere
Endangered."
"There is no more cruel tyranny;
than that which is exercised in
the shadow of the laws and under
the color of justice." Montesquieu.
Let us be thankful that today at
least, we who live in the United
States, do not need to lease our
churches from the government;
do not need to ask some govern-
ment official if we may build and
use a new church edifice; do not
need to struggle along with but
one pastor to thirty thousand
parishioners, if that happens to
be some government underling's
idea of a sufficient clerical staff.
Let us rejoice that our clergy
still possess the civic and political
rights inherent in citizenship-
the right to vote, to meet in po-
litical assemblies, to hold office,
to criticize laws and officials, to
inherit and to own property. Let
us be happy that our churches
may erect and maintain hospitals,
orphanages, refuges for the way-
ward, the aged, and the poor,
schools, colleges, seminaries, sci-
entific laboratories and observa-
tories, convents and monastaries.
Let us be glad that our newspa-
pers do not suffer a political cen-
sorship; that there is no code of
discriminatory laws in force
against any of us, in case of vio-
lation of which the right to trial
by jury is suspended.
For in Mexico all these evils ex-
ist "in the shadow of the laws."
In Mexico these denials of human
liberties are made. Yet many
Americans who think themselves
liberal, who pride themselves on
their devotion to American prin-
ciples, are strangely silent; they
utter no protest against the ac-
tion of the Mexican .government.-
When fundamental liberties such
as the right to liberty of con-

I

RESULT OF CAMPUS
ELECTIONS
London, England, May 13.-As a re-
sult of the sweeping victory in the
University of Michigan campus elec-
tions of the Anti-British-Strike party,
yesterday, labor leaders here have l
ordered the men back to work, thus
bringing to an end the general strike.
Prominent public officials expressed
complete satisfaction with the campus
vote, and were full of gratitude for
the relieving of the situation here.
The King also spoke.
Word received here late today told
of a $50,000 gift from ROLLS, promi-
nent publication on the Michigan cam-
pus, which was to have been sent to
the aid of the the unfortunate col-
umnists of London newspapers, who
have been out of work for a week.
The Prince of Wales and several
dukes applauded the friendly offer,
which of course cannot now be used.
One of the.worst effects of the set-
tlement will be the lack of jobs for
the upper crust, who have been hav-
ing a lot of fun lately running trains
and dishing out food.
And the amateur photographers
that have been getting good money
for those picturres that were radioed
across the Atlantic will be out of.
work.
The sudden ending of the strike
came just in time to avert a crisis in
America, it was learned here today
by this correspondent, although the
impending crash was not known ex-
tensively even in U. S. official circles.
ROLLS was just about to call a strike
of all humor columns in America,
including the world-famous Michigan
Music and Drama column.
* * *
WELCOME, FATHERS
Tonight the fathers come to Ann
Arbor-just in time to see their sons
burn up about 75c worth of their
money, in the form of a little grey
pot. But the fathers will enjoy it,
fo'r what father wouldn't delight in
seeing his son face such a heated
struggle with such great joy?
Then, too, they will hear their sons
sing, "Oh where?" and witness the
passing of their pride and expense
into the next class, with one less year
to go.
And after the ceremonies in Sleep
Hollow they will probably visit the
unceremonious in Hill auditorium,

Richard Crooks
who will sing Lohengrin to Florence j
Austral's Elsa in the annual May
Festival.
Of course, the mere recognition of
being the "perfect tenor" is in itself
a rather empty honor. They may call
Martinelli "the king of them all" and
Chaliapin a "Russian Cossack with a
cold in his head"; and they have said
that Caruso had imperfections--yet
every tenor in the game would give
a left lung to develop these imper-
fections. However, even though he
may have to labor under the handi-
cap of being "the perfect tenor" Rich-
ard Crooks since his American debut
in 1922 and his European.in 1925, has
been one of the most commanding
musical figures in New York. Begin-
ning with concert work he has ad-
vanced Tapidly, and while he has not;
as yet attained much versatility in
role, lie has mastered Lohengrin to
such an extent that they are still
talking about it at the Metropolitan.
* * *
JULIA ARTHUR IN DETROIT
When George Tyler presented his
all-star cast of the revival of "The
School for Scandal" in New York for
a single performance, there was con-
siderable raillery between the Great
God Woolcott and his cohorts con-
cerning New York's danger of becom-
ing a one-night stand. However De-
troit has now suffered the same fate.
Julia Arthur is playing Shaw's "Saint
Joan" in Detroit for ona night on
Saturday, May 15, and the critics
are endeavoring to be insulted. To
date the local patrons of the drama
have never vouchsafed any objection
to one-night stands at the Whitney,
and Miss Arthur who is presenting
the same show in Ann Arbor on Fri-
day of the same week will not feel:
the critic's sting for that reason. But
one never can tell what the moral
effect the three to eight performances
of Mimes, Comedy Club and Masques
productions at the renovated Mimes
theater for the past year will create
on the campus!
* * *
THE SCHUBERT CONCERT
The Shuberts are so confident after
the successes of the "Student Prince"
and "Blossom Time" that their
"Countess Maritza" will equal that
record that they are preparing five
road companies for next season.
* * *

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-1

715 N. University Place
On the Campus

Have Some Candy for the Good
Times This Week!
We keep all kinds of candies at all times.
You can't find fresher or any better in town.
Let us fix you up with your favorite.
Friday-Saturday Special, 50c
Parcel Post Mailing Service.

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CLEVELAND

DETROIT

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...HIEAR...

jean

Goldkette s

ORIGINAL
B4lowers
MICHIGAN UNION
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS
MAY 14 &1,5

This Orchestra plays at the Graystone in
Detroit and at Island Lake in the summer
--Radio broadcasters.

Im

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