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May 06, 1926 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-05-06

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PACE tO

TH F- MICHTGAN

DAILY

THE ICHIAN DILYTHUIRSDAY, -MAY 6, 1V26

BOUDRICH EXPLAI'NSI
CAUSES OF STRIKE
English Trade Vnions (Called (GeneralI
Walk-out To Avert Lowering
Of All Wages'
GIVES OPPOSING VIEWS
Seeing a crisis for the whole trade
uniion movement of England. labor in
that country called the general strike
determined to uphold the cause of the
miners in order to safeguard their
own, interests, in the opinion of Prof.
Carter Goodrich, of the economics de-
partment, who is specializing in labor
union study.
"The miners are combined into the
strongest union in England," said Pro-
fessor Goodrich in an interview yes-'
terday, "and the other labor unions
realizeA1 that if the former were beat-
en in the strike, and had to take a
reduction in wages, it would meanj
that the others would also. Another I
factor responsible for the strike is al
strong, class loyalty there that is not1
found in America.
"The great increase in the power of
unionism in England in the last 40
Years has been a change quite as
serious as what in other countries
would be called a revolution," he stat-
ed. in regard to the high degree of
organization.
Speaking of the miners' reasons for
striking, Professor Goodrich said that
thiey realized that England is in bad
condition economically, and that
changes have to be made. But, he ad-
dle, they demand that a reorganiza-
tion in industry rather than a cut ;n
ivages.

Students Occupying City
Positions. For Day

And County w ROFM wOB~GIVE
Talk At Luncheon
..Ct' ia l to th i 1U.( I N~) j i n i'121, FIST 1F, S vL EITJR

The o.Pposipg view, he

sa 4id, sr~t e;sses Irk

AICande ° Inc.

the fact that the Liline of dcpr-ess;iont
not the time for radical changes. and
favos the traditional ('faim(IV of xvag -
redatv n 1Owev(r, cthe labor at~t-
r ueucanot be understood well with-;
out a study of the background.

o;' the ('ha 111b1 . .r1o('ol m1 ,r'(ca, a!, 4whi10h
11i 11 s('IIod 5t"'AlntM \whot) veleilCfl- K..XIosees C om,5erg of the de-
in g 1 h, oi_)5t n 3 of the city and fau(In0111-o!Itmento! chemihst ry. will deliver
t v officials for tOlie (day ere gil1e ;t5,. the first. of the an iiulal Hienry Russell
la vor liober,, A. Campetll nssertcfl lect ures on Jamy 17, at 4 :15 o'clock in
that tho custom o 013peritting bot~ys !I Naua,12l S0ien1CC a luit0o1ium. ,accord(-

I'atron ize mailt' Ad vertisers.-Adv.

i
1

"'The British miners' union is lik ;.a cii girls to gain an insight into theit
the American union in the stnbl~born - Iinsct to ning of city government by; ac- th
nJess with which it holds to the dIo(:- ' tl experience was one of tlhe most rn f ~obcwr tt, ecn-patclmtosytdvlpdadj-
tinned. "13ut, it is unlike the Amer- tea a fit training for the dties of
ican union movemnent; in the breadth future citizenship.
and 'definiteness of the proposal' Eachz of the young officials gave a
which it thinks woirld make backw ardl reptort on his activities of the morn-I
stet5, unecesary , ;ing, reviewing the functions of the
The history of the feeling goes b~ack aiu pstos
to 191.9, Professor Goodrich said, when I-twseilie yHrc arn
in order to avert a crisis like the ! ating chief of police, that 90 per
present one, the government set up ' cnt of the arrests mnade by the local'j
the Sankey Coal commission, with the department were for violations of
half-pronmise that all of its reconmen traffic ordinances, breaches of the
dat~n woldbeputino efet. prohibition laws and other crimes
Justice Sankey And the majority of composing but a small part of the
the commnission brought in the report total, lie asserted that Ann Arbor
in favor of nationalization of the had fewer crimes than any other
mines with a minority representation Michigan city of a similar size.
of union appointees on the b~oards of The fire department had 289 callIs
control. during the past year, Edwin Elliott,
"However," continuedl Professor fire chief for the day, said. The de-
Goodrich, "the government refused toj partient has a personnel of 30 mni,11
adopt the recommendations." The de- divided into two crews working 24
sire of the miners for nationstlization ;hour shifts. The equipment consists
of three pumping engines, three
was strengthened by the findings of trucks and the car for the chief, he,
the quite-conservative commnission ap-I
pointed by Premier Raldwini last year. sad
Ths omisin epaedmay f Ann Arbor has 63 miles of dirt
Thiscomisson epeaed anyof streets and 23 miles of pavemeont, the

i to an announcement issuedI from
he President's office.
EiIE+l HET PRICES PAID FOR
Men's %sed ClothingI
or an~y other ARTICLE OF VALUJE
STUDENT TAILOR SHOP
Phone 800 Cor, N. Univ. & Thayer
I PAY
REST PRICES
For Men's Used Clothing.
1"hone 4314 115 W. Washington
11. BENJAMIN
For All Makes of Cars.
rIRES FOR SALE.
JUNK CARS BOUGHT
PHONE 3033.
KESSLER BROS., Canal Street

t

I

tne criticisms made by the otner boody,
and recommended a degree of govern-{
ment control over the industry, not as
radical au the former, but which in
Aimerica would be considered quite
radical.I
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.,

upkeep of which belongs to the city
engineer's departmnent, explained Mal-
comn Howe, student, engineer. The
city is only constructing one mile of; i4' / ,-
paved streets this year to four miles °
last year, hie said.

Od 1Cl2
S Callizme or bi
se*eco hand
SAMIf
41.9 . Aimn

TIALO,
The Highest
Workma

*

for Bli11
RICES cc
ring thevft to 1
o buy dtbr
Garticle.
ELLI
M2al 4304~
)RING
tGrade of
nship in
SING
.EPAIRING
a Specialty.
DEMAN1
Pliouue 7990
MEEK Ii
Nights. -2ft to'.$1.50
Mats.' we:d 25 c-75c f

ARE YOUA
'CRAFTSMAN? I
Skilled craftsmen with an education'
are in demand as teachers in voca-
tional schools. Are you an
Architectural Draftsman i
Baker
Barber
Bricklayer and Plasterer
CarpenterI
lectrfian
Foundryian
ilacltiiiit
Painter and Decorator
Plumuber and Steam iii1tter
Printer
Mwbet Metal Worker
Stationary Engineer
Positions in the above crafts and
others are open now and in Septemn-
her.. Write giving full particulars)
with reference to age, experience, edui-
ation and salary expected. Ades
Board of Vocational Education, Mad-
ison, Wis.

U'

All popular Brogue models! on display
at
GUS' WOOLFOLK & CO.
336 South State Street
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Plasts and Patterns exclusive& our own dlesr n

9
y
_

ANOW ATTHE
Matinees
2:00-3:40 Pi e
ices5

V

.,

°rE

W40

ti.
.
.f
>:;
t ,,,

Nights
7:00-8:40
Prices
I Oc --50c

rHEAT/

NOW SHOWING

CLEANING
PRESS
RI
Remodelinga
LOU IS 11LI
802 S. State St.

jow..H.1civi

JONNSOA/8f KiJRPHY ^^-- ----{

WHITEHOUSE & HARD'
MNCORP-ORATED
BROADWAY.AT 40TH STREET 144 WEST 42ND STREET
METROPOLITAN OPERA [loust BLDG. KNICKERBOCKER BULIlNG
0 864 BROAQWY-AT WALL STREET IN -

Y

- i

r

DIETROIT '1
T HIS %

.. t,
.

:,e.(

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QARRIOI(

, W4'
Sdf
('2
',,;'
p ,Q!

' °t k ...l' F
"C r
,gyp
? r; "
' a .1

THE CARRICI( COMPANY~
With Ann EUsrdingl-Rll Pt0rs In
"1TARNISHM"
t ~Nights 75C to t51
Sonstelle P ayjiiuu tat,'So75
Woodward at I4ilot Tel. Glendale 9792!
The DONSTELLE 'COO
Presents Wmn. Faversham as Guest Star
"~The Squaw Mau"
hnn~n~ Lafayette at Sheiqy
Shubrt Ltayefe ights, 50c to $2 50
Sat.Mlat.. 5oc-$.zo!
P'opThurs.Mat. 5oc to $i.5o, plus tax. Cad. 87c5
WALKER WtIITESIDE
Assisted by Miss Sydney Shields
In a Modern Comedy Romance
"The Arabla""

.iN,.
_ ti
Vi V

When

Ztmric sGreatest Actor
w $ f~ P 'I I
____ -'"2"'' it~
a'irk'-p -~

it's the night of

the season 's

most festive dance-

'ic
A
1 A)
Mi
y12.
AN"

and Mimi, herself, has consented

fir

to go.-when in

a last moment

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-,-
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before starting you thank
2your good fortune
-have a Camel!

Q D

q

AVACATION

..

TRAVEL IN EUROPE.
With Good Companions
See Canada, Scotland, England,
Holland, Germany, France,
Switzerland.
44 ays $460
Ladies supervised by the Secre-
tary nor 1Wmen. on the Univer-
sity of, Michigan campus; men
by the State Secretary of the
S. 0. E., and the local President
of the Presbytei'ian S. C. E.
People of integrity. Don't. worry
about a single detail! Every-
thing arranged in advance.
Leave July 1. Tortiist cabin.
Party limited.
Ajraj#9!genuP, Com~pleted By
PR~ONE 611 4

WHEN the night of the
famous prom has come
--and you contemplate
your luck and your
greatness - have a
Camel!
For Camel adds of its
own romance to every
memorable event. Camels
never tire the taste, never
leave a cigaretty after-
taste. When you light a
Camel, you may know
you are smoking the
world's mellowest
cigarette.
So this night, as you
fare boldly forth to
society's smartest and
gayest affair--learn then
how sympathetic, haw
really fine and friendly a
cigarette can be.
Have a Camel!

George

0' Hara

NOTE
The managemennt urges
all who can to attend
the matinees. or cone
early, as all evening
performances have
been sold out.

'Dolores Costello

--ADDED)

-'V

f_. , 1__ ___'Lt'__,,. .tI 4I _ .. .. _ f I 1. _.

SPECIAL MUSICAL SCORE
Comnpiled by
N\TC1r- nl A qV" n T S (~( 1V

FIEATIURES -
CARTOON
I HFELIX THE CAT"

n- I.-&- -,:, L -r -.. .4-

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