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January 10, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-10

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.., .. ,

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WTEDNESDAY, FEI3VRUARY 10, 192G

Published every morning except Monday
d ring the University year bysthe Bsoard in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Corderence Editorial
Association.
i oe Associated Press is exclusively en-
tit ld to th, use for republication of all news
diap aches credited to it or not otherwise
c. d in this paper andthe local news pub-
l,;io,,,a oerin.
red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
J1 ,an, as second class matter. Special rate
o ,tage granted by Third Assistant Post-
Grenral.
Subscription. by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
eices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
Phones:eEditorial, 4925; business, 21214.

some extent does, serve as a model
for the states. A general cleaning at
Washington would abolish a multitude
of corrupt practices and endear to the
American people the administration
efficient enough to bring about a ?I IiF
change for the better. ISM114L(IAN
3IEXICO( HAS RIGhTS! _______

MUSIC
.D
DRAMA

GRAI I

T +

BOOKS

JDITORLAL STAFF
Telephone 4921
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS

4

ran, Editorial Board...Norman R. fhal
Editor ,.... . Robert S. Mansfield
e Editor ...........Manning Houseworth
k" en's Editor...........Helen S Ramsay
S rts Editor................Joseph Kruger
] degraph Editor......... William Walthour'
;c and Drama.....Robert B. IIenderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby Thomas V. Koykka
Robert T. De ore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

A
A
A

Certrude ;. Bailey
William T. Barbour
Charles Behymer
Wiiam Breyer
]Plilip C. Brooks
L. Buckingham
Stratton Buck
. rl Burger
1E.lgar Carter
3 oscph Chamberlain
Meyer Cohen
Carleton Champe
Etug ene H. Gutekunst
Douglas Doubleday
Mary Dunnigan
Andrew Goodman
]ties T. Herald
iles Kimball

Marion Kubik
Walter H. Mack
Iouis R. Markus
Ellis Merry
Helen Morrow
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Simon Rosenbaum
1uth Rosenthal
Wilton A. Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland C. Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

In a lengthy interview with the
New York Times recently, President
Calles, chief executive of the Mex-
ican republic, clearly and for the firstI
time stated the position of his gov-
ernment as regards the constitutional
regulations which are said to keenlyz
affect the interests of American capi-
tal in that country, particularly in the1
matter of oil and chicle timber.
There can be no question as to the
absolute right of Mexico, whom thisj
country has recognized as a sovereign
state, to enact regulatory measures
restricting the extent to which ourI
capital may be allowed to exploit
within its boundaries. And it would
seem that the same government would
have more than a controversial right1
to repudiate any grants mnade to
American capital bygformer govern-
ments whose position was never se-,
cure, and whose integrity and soy-
ereignity was never universally or of-
ficially recognized.
The whole question is centered
around, not the problem of the legal
right or wrong of the action taken by
the Mexican government, but whether
or not the exercise, of these rights
will be to the best advantages of the
country. Has Mexico produced enough
capital in the form of capital goods
and money to carry on production to'
the point of highest efficiency without
the assistance of American financiers?
This is the question which must be
answered, and answered by Mexico I
herself, uninfluenced by American
interests with only the satisfactionI
of their own desires in view.
Nor should the answer to this ques-
tion be reluctantly squeezed from theI
Mexican government by official pres-
sure exerted by her more powerful
neighbor. It is not right, legally or
morally, for our government to em-
ploy threatening or coercive measures
to gain the selfish ends of "big busi-
ness." If it can be honestly shown
that, at present, Mexico has not suffi-
ciently developed to exploit her own
resources then, and then only, Amer-
ican capital should be given a free
rein in that country, providing, of
course, that both parties to the in-
quiry reach a common understanding
of this matter.
Events of the past few years have
not been of the sort to promote the
best of feeling in this country for the'
young republic. Affairs in Mexico the,
concern us are always tainted with
the unfavorable prejudice that arose
from the highly painted escapades ofI
several well known bandit leaders.
Nor must we forget the rather shatd-
owy part we took in the annexation
of Texas. The dubious scruples of1
both countries upon certain occasions
have left a mark which cannot be for-
gotten.
Since there are only two more
months of winter weather, spring
hats ought to be "in."

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising..................Joseph J. Finn
Advertising..............T. D. Olmsted, Jr.
Advertising..............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Nivertising..................Wm. L. Mullin
circulation..................H. L. Newman
a'ubiication......... ......Rudolph Bostehnan
.Counts.,................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

A liew or used copy of the
SECOND edition of the Daily's
J-Hop extra. The one which
contains the photo of the Hop.
We will send twenty five (25)
cents in stamps to anyone who
will mail us a copy of this issue,
care of this office. Copies of this
issue are rather scarce and we
,desire one for purposes of rec-
ord. This is written in all seri-
ousness.'

i
;

f

S

v M. Alving
1ge H. Annable Jr.
\. (arl Bauer
I 1- 1. obtiuL
4. 3. Cox
i~A.Danitl
A. Rolland Damm
9ary Flinterman
Stan Gilbert
Haven
R. Nelson

F. A. Norquist
Loleta G. Parker
Julius C. Pliskow
Robert Prentiss
Wmn. C. Pusch'
Franklin J. Rauner
Joseph Ryan
Margaret Smith
Mance Solomon'
Thomas Sunderland
Eugene Weinberg
Wmi. J. Weinman
Sidn~ey Wilson

* * *
MAN AND THE MASSES
teach day there are more young
ladies at work or play in this office.
It is rumored that tea will be served
every afternoon at five, to which the
more desireable of the few remaining
men will be asked occasionally. (By
a vote of six to one the staff when
asked decided that that was the right
way to spell it. We assume no re-
sponsibility. Four to one on that
word). Now that the place has been
repainted and everything we are wait-
ing fer the womanly touch to appear.
Each day we enter with fear and tre-
pidation. Will there or won't ther
be cretonno about all the windows
and bowls of roses on all the desks.
We don't know exactly how many
of the fairer and fewer sex there are
enrolled on this campus, but it is our
wager that no less than fifty per cent
of them spend half the day helping
to fill one page with news about what
the other fifty per cent do . In a few
days the same situation will exist
among the men, however, and that
will make things more or less even.
Then this old office will be a seething
mass of humanity, as the paragraph-
ers are want to say.
* * *
IMIP SEE)S DRY FUTURE FOR
UNiVERSIT'Y. SAYS NEW STA-
DIITM WILL NEVER SEE
LIQUOR
Crew Cach 1eclares Bays of Dunks
On College Canipus Is Over For
Good.
Ann Arbor, Mich.-Feb. 10th, 1926.
On top of the stenuous campaign
instigated by University authorities at
Michigan to clean up the drinking sit-
uation on that campus, E. Hamilton
Mipp, noted crew coach, stated that
he saw absolute success for the plan.
"There will be no more drinking at
Michigan from now on," he said, "for
the students are too obedient to dis-
obey the strict orders to ban all booze
whitchI they have received. Although
the new stadium plan which looks
1 pretty hopeful at present is seen by
many as a new cause for orgies by
undergraduates, I am convinced that
this is impossible. On the contrary,
I believe that the percentage of drink-
ers at games in the new bowl will be
much less, in spite of the suggestive-
ness of that name.
1 believe this because I do not see
how enough hootch can be brought
from Canada to supply even a half of
of the seventy thousan spectators.
I As it is the bootleggers are forced to
work hard all week long during the
football season in order to get enough
in for the week-ends, and these men
are coming more and more to consider
themselves as a leisure class. They
resent having to work this hard.
especially when they make enough
money to supply their needs without
doing so. Therefore it is quite obvious
that there will be less drinking in the
future, if for no other reason tha
that there won't be enough to gc
'round."
This was all he would say.
. . *

TONIG eT: Tile ,iiies Vaudeville in
the Slimes theteire at S:15.
"STOLEN FRUIT"
A review, by Clarice Tapson.
The play may be the thing, but it
consistently holds that a fair play
with a fine cast will win an audience
far more easily than a fine play with
a fair. cast. All of which introduces
"Stolen Fruit," the play by an Italian
new to us, Dario Niccodemi, which is
occupying the stage of the Garrick
theater this week.
It will not set any houses on fire
if you read it, but as it is played by
Ann Harding Rollo Peters, Larry
Beresford, and the rest, it fairly tears
the audience down. The story con-
cernisa little school teacher who
serves a school in a small town in
France to be near an unmarked grave
that she believes that of her baby
daughter, who was taken from her at
birth. Eventually, through the aid of
the mayor of the town, she finds that
her daughter is not dead, but is one
of the class of little girls whom she
teaches. She is finally re-united with
her child: the father who is legiti-
mately tide to someone else, re-
nounces his claims; and the school
teacher, the mayor, and little Annette
begin on their "happy-ever after" ex-
istence.
Not a marvelous play, you might
say, and you would be right; but itf
has some dramatic climaxes that are
great theatre. Anybedy who can -re-
main unmoved at the end of the sec-
ond act when Ann Harding as the
school teacher, searches the faces of
the children in her class trying to de-
cide which of them is hers, shouldl
not pass a box-office.
The actmg honors go, of course
to Miss Harding; another of Miss B n-
stelle's stars is rapidly approaching
the peak of the theatrical heaven. In
a role that could be easily over-acted
to the point of being ridiculous, she
uses just enough restraint. She is
emotional, but intelligently, and just
sufficiently. To the Detroit audience
that awaited her with open arms Sun-
day evening, with mingled memories
of her earlier performances with the
l3onstelle Players, she seemed about
perfect, in spite of a cold.
Rollo Peters as Count Philippe de

I , 1.

MkW$=MWMKW=VAMMWM

:1

I

PENS and INK EXCLUSIVELY

315 State St.

SKILLED REPAIRING
A LL AK E S

AND SECOND HAND

QUICK SERVICE

F

r,

6
(

iAKE SELL
MANN'S e
"A Wiser and Metter Place
to Buy."
Watch for Our New Spring Line.
Hats Cleaned and Blocked.
FACTORY HAT STORE
17 Packard Street. Phone 7415.
Where 1). U. I. Stops at State St.)
DON'T
PAT H S
EN T H E
t
Paths on snow fom ice and kill I
all grass roots beneath. Please
don't make or use such paths. I
i.
SDid you notice
:how we Spell 2 ;
9
'5.

HOW ABOUT THAT PLEDGE DANCE ?
You want the best music possible, of course. It's
JOE PARKER'S CF ORCHESTRA
Give us a chance to prove it.
Dial 6381 and ask for "Norm" Gilmore

I

GRANGER'S

8-10 TONIGHT'
Our usual W E D N E S D A Y
night dance.
Dancing Wednesday
Friday and Saturday

Craham Book Stoares
A Both Ens of the Diagonal Walk.

Start. The Se ester IRloght, wit
a IThe only
Fountain .en which holds enough ink for Student Use. It's a
Self-Starter anrd Steady Writer.
No' 6V r" pen like it or equal to it. Made, Sold and Ser-
viced right here in Ann Arbor.

II
'

AV EDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 19261

Night Editor-SMITH II. CADY, JR.
"Great Britain, the master ship-
per of the world before the war,
is recovering and is fighting hard
to regain her pre-war supremacy..
If we do not get behind our Mer-
chant Marine and actively boost
in every way we can, in another
decade foreign ships will again be
doing our carrying trade, for they
are fighting hard for it. If our
merchant marine is again swept
from the seas and again foreign-
ers do more than 90 per cent of
our carrying trade, again shall we
pay rates fixed in conferences
where we have no voice and from
the injustice of which we shall
have no appeal."-Commissioner
William S. Hill of United States
Shipping Board before the Min-,
nieapolis Traffic Club today.
GOVERNMENTAL EFFICIENCY
Teachers and students of political
science, and others who theorize on
the problems of government, may find
food for thought in the charges of
Representative Martin L. Davey,
Democrat, of Ohio, who declares that
the "average government clerk in
Washington is a loafer, time-killer,
and buck-passer." The only federal
employees to escape his scathing de-
nunciation are the letter carriers and
others directly concerned with the
handling of the mails.
This is not the first time that the
g neral loafing at Washington has
been dragged into the limelight. It
would seem that a democratic form of
government means opportunity for
wasting the tax-payers' money on sev-
eral thousands of men and women
w7ho obtain their positions largely
Vhrough "pull," despite the civil serv-
ice, and who continue to hold down
desks in the government offices with-
out doing any work. According to
.Representative Davey, government
clerks work, or pretend to work, a
maximum of seven hours a day, with
Saturday afternoons off in the sum-
mer, thirty days of vacation, and
thirty days sick leave, not counting
Sundays and holidays.
"The existing conditions -are a
tragic perversion of the spirit of the
government," he declared in a letter
to the Ohio State Federation of La-
b6r. "We should get rid of 100,000
.I- +to +Vm- n,d vnc. co-

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EDITORIAL COMMENT]
FRANCE IN TfE CRIC ET FIELD!
(The Manchester Guardian Weekly)
The possibility that French soldiers
may be taught to play cricket is cer-
tainly a little surprising, but the
world's peoples and customs tend
more and more towards overlapping,
and perhaps it is, in the nature of
things, improbable that cricket should
remain for ever the province of Eng-
lish-speaking peoples. If the news be
accurate as well as surprising, it will
be interesting to see what Frenchmen
,.kpo f thr La-mc, At Riby footbal l

Verdois, the mayor, does his best in a
not difficult role. No longer Romeo,
but now a French country gentleman,
he still retains a finish in his acting
that is a comfort to behold. Harry.
Beresford as the old janitor provides
a fine amount of humor not unmixed
with pathos, and Virginia Farmer in
the role of another school teacher and
Helen Strickland in that of the vin-
dictive. principal, while from the
American credo they seem to over-act,
fitted well into the general French
atmosphere .
THE OtNGAN RECITAL
The customary Organ Recital for
this afternoon in Hill auditorium has I
been omitted due to the absence of
Palmer Christian from the city.
* * *
"WHY 'MARlR "
Masques, the women's campus dra-I
matic organization, has received per-
mission from Jesse Lynch Williams,
holder of the Fellowship in Creative
Arts, to produce "Why Marry?", the
first play ever to receive the annual
Pulitzer Prize.1 In o rder to insure the
best production possible, the tryouts
are being opened to the entire campus,
including both men and women. Mr.
Williams has also offered to assist
Phyllis Loughton, who will direct the
performance, in the general interpre-
tion as well as the casting.
Th.e tryouts will be held in New-
berry hall from three to six o'clock on
Friday and nine to twelve o'clock on
Saturday of this week. The play
itself will be presented in the Mimes
theatre Wednesday and Thursday,
March 17 and 18.
-V. D.
* * *
TIE FACULTY CONCER'
The Fourth Faculty Concert of the
year will be presented in Hill audi-
toriuni Sunday afternoon, February
14, at four-fifteen o'clock. The solo-
ists will include Nora Crane Hunt,
contralto, Albert Lockwood, pianist,
Marian St rubble-Freeman, violinist,
and the School of Music Quartet made
up of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel P. Lock-
wood, violins, Pauline Kaiser, viola, I
and Ora Larthard, 'cello.
The program has been selected as
follows:
Quartet, A minor, Op. 41,
No. 1.................Schumann
Introaduzione-Allegro;
Schcrzo; Adagio; Presto
Mr. and Mrs. Lockwood
Miss Kaiser
Miss Larthard
An die Music.............Schubertj
Mleine Liebe ist grun........Brahms

U l E R

liarmony
Yes, Hf-monv is what
r
we provide for our pat-
rons. Pleasant surround-
ings, tasty food, and ser-qI
vice that attracts and
pleases. That is the secret
of our success.
Inar muny
508 East Williams

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Abler Va~ilp r.i rr tIle Tinst -of D1resi~rnWell'

._....

New Low Prices On Overcoats Go In
Effect Today Less Than
COST
VALUES TO $60.00
If we could tell yen muthi davertisement what these overcoats
commanded in theregular way there proably wouldn't lie eso.gh
to go aroumnd at these prices.

__,,
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3~

4

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LcN' T Q ll InO Ar -- -

.1

New opring 1 ogs YAre r sere

ma eo 0Weg 91U. tU UK.Yl~~ci
they play uncommonly well; at lawn ODE
tennis they nowadays terrorise us. I
Both these games lend themselves I love my bottle, I love it
brilliantly to the traditional Gallic I love the taste and I love t
fervour, but whether three days on l ut I need a companion, I c
the cricket field, on the lines of our Oh where the Hell is Mul
county matches, will fit in quite so II
well with that temperament remains 'Tis cold itnd glowery. 'Tis
to be seen. One can very well imagine and drear
a French demon bowler; one can also j Yet in this chamber have I
see him being vigorously punished by I 'Tis an hour now since I be
a French mighty swiper; but does the Oh, where the Hell is Mul
Gallic stonewaller come so readily to 111
mind? Sonme, thinking of that difli- The clock strikes One
culty, may become more interested afraid
than ever in the thought of France Sonic fearsome Ghost inI
and cricket-a teamn with no stonie- I strayed
wallers in it would be a fine cat to set Once more I bellow the ol
amnongst our cautious ('otiy pigeomis. Oh, w hemre thme Hlell is Mu
But this would be all very much in IV
the future, and if the game has to be- Alas, alack the bottom is 1
gin on the barrack-square in France it I groan with sorrow, I da
will be some time before there is any- cry
thing but the equivalent of the rough- May the devil take himn an
est of "village green" cricket to con- clan
sider. And if it has to begin on the Oh, where the Hell is Mul
barrack-square it may, perhaps, end I V
there-to tie the game up with mili- And now 'tis morn and nc
tary service is not giving it the best him
of allchan neso rnsurviving as a fea-' rlio kv i soumnbr aidg

New Suits New Top Coats New Hats and Caps
"Boy, What Hot Ties!"
213 East Liberty St. The Tarsity Laundry Is Opposite Us
"Twenly-oie Years a Tailor-Nuff Said."

well
the smellJ
all again
[igan?
glowery
I cheer
egan I
ligan?
and I'm
here has
d refrain
bligan?
high
min near
id all his
ligan?
o sign of
grav and i

+- --_

1_a ..ed

,14

O.1\1

r 4t ;

at CAMPUS BOOTERY
TODAY AND TOMORROW
W. I. BOGGS, Representatie

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