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April 24, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-24

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eir t' o y .1lan. that won't rean the tities out oa,.

- AGE FO-tJR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1.26

Published every morning except Mornay
during the University year by the Boat in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conerence Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
hredited in this paper and the local news pub-
fished therein.
Entered at the postofilce at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50:;by mail,
$4.0o.
Offices: An* Arbor Press Building. May-
aard Street.
Phones: Xditoral, 4;i busIness, N12: .

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Telepbons 4924

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MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board....Norman R. Thal
City .Editor.........Robert S. Mansfield
Nttws Editor............Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor...........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor.....Josoph Kruger
Telegraph Editor..........William Wathour
Music and Drama........ Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors;
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistaut City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

SIX DAYS A WEEK!!!
Word issued at Tniversity offices
yesterday is to the effect that next
year literary college students will be
required to elect Saturday classes far
more liberally than has been the
practice in the past. At any rate, de-
partment heads who are preparing
next semester's class programs have
been reminded that in line with the
recent action of the faculty, "Satur-
day morning classes should be sched-
uled to the same relative extent as
those on'other lays of the week."
Such action, though it is without
doubt well advised, will not be hailed
as an unmitigated blessing by many
students; perhaps even a good many
faculty men, though prone to charge
the student body with a lack of "in-
tellectual curiosity," will not find it
cause for rejoicing. However that
may be, there is no valid reason why
classes should not be regularly sched-
uled for Saturday mornings. It is
even possible that the practice, after
it has been tried, will gain favor, for
certainly it will lighten the load dur-
ing the week.
No means for coercing students intc
electing Saturday classes have beer
adopted, and none are contemplated;
it is the belief of those sponsoring the
move that students shun Saturday
classes, not entirely because of in-
herent dislike, but' largely because
they have not been regularly offered.
In fact, it dias even been hinted that
it is chiefly a dislike for Saturda3
classes on the part of certain factions
of the faculty that has brought then'
into disfavor.
In professional sch'ools, attendanct
at Saturday classes is expected as a
matter of course. In' the literary col-
lege, with the exception of freshman
courses, the reverse has been true.
However, the first semester of next
year may usher in a new era.

OATED L L
THE REGENTS
Well, to quote Mr. Shaw, You
Never Can Tell. Just when the pools
on how many years it would take for
all the Regents to get together were
going strong, along comes some
warm weather and Lo, the Regentsf
return, and bytbringing a few friends
each, manage to get up a quorum.
And so Michigan will have a brand!
new stadium one of these years in
which, according to the best tradi-
tions, it will loose the dedication
game. And now us students can be
put even further from the field or
play. And now people even. from
California can get pretty good seats,
if a friend of their's knows a barber
in Detroit who can get him some
fifty yard line seats.
r *I

Spring has arrived.
thought we'd mention it.
* * *

We just

Gertrude Bailey
Charles Behymer
George Berneike
William Breyer
P'hilip (:. Brooks
Farnum Buckingham
Stratton Buck
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
Meyer Cohen
Carleton Champe
Douglas Doubleday
Eugene Ii. Gutekunst
Andrew Goodman
James T. Herald
ussell bHitt
Mriles Kimball
Klarion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
'ourtland Snith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendl'er
Henry Thurnau
David C. yokes
Marion Wells
┬░Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Mvarguerite Zilske

BUSINESS STAFFI
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
Advertising........ ..-..Joseph J. Finn
Advertising.............R ud~yh p oitelman
Adverti~irtg.................... L. Mullin
Advertising......... homas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation....... ..James R. DePuy
P'ublication...... .......Franis Il. Dentz, Jr.I
Accounts...................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants{

AND
DRAMA

TONIGHT:
in the School
8 o'clock.

Tile Students' Recital
of Music auditorium at

;i

FRIDAY AND, SATURDAY SPECIAL
1 box White Vellum Stationery, 1 package Envelopes to-match
Regularly sells for $1.75
Special $1.09
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

HOW TO REST
The fountain of happiness is being
made the object of systematic search
by a committee appointed by . the
mayor of Chicago, who feels that the
citizens have a lot to learn regarding
the possibilities of wholesome recre-
ation in their city.
That such a search should be neces-

r , neTT A.". ^_b r

Fozn Mse

Georg H. nnable, Jr. ranx oXc
W. Carl Bauer F. A. Norquist ) sary is a sad commentory on our
John 11. Bobrink Loleta G. Parket present large-city life, yet it is per-
;Manley S. Coddiington David Perrot pYti spr
W. J. Cox Robert Prentiss feetly true that the great majority of
Mari'nterman e ance Solomonthe inhabitants of any city do not ap-
Stan Gilbert Thomas Sunderland preciate, much less take advantage
T. Kenneth IHaven Win. J. Weinman
'Ilarold Holmes Margaret Smith of, the best forms of development and
Oscar A. Jose Sidney Wilson recreation.
Much blame is to be placid on the
citizens themselves for not searching
SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1926 out the means of recreation and ad-
vancement, yet the city and other
Night Editor-SMITH H. CADY, JR. agencies supplying the sources of
happiness have not done their part in
THE IE(ENTS ACT bringing the parks, libraries, play-
'Wisely leaving all the details to the grounds, gymnasiums, social centers,
good judgment of the Board in Con- and concerts to the reach of all sec-
trol of Athletics, the Regents of the tions of the population. This con-
University have brought to a close J mittee will attempt the expansion of
more than five years of continual these services to everyone.
agitation for the construction of an Other cities will do well to follow
adequate football stadium. With the the lead of Chicago, and find the
single provision that they are not to fount of happiness in their respective
"over do it," the matter has been localities. Some will have a long and
placed in the hands of those best difficult search, but unlike Ponce de
qualified to handle it, the men actu- Leon, they can build their own foun-
ally in charge of the destinies of tain.
Michigan athletics.
Michigan will not promptly Inaugu-
rate a boom to "build the world's CAMPUS OPINION
largest football arena" or engage in a Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of cornmuni-
"stadia race" with other universities, cants will, however, be regarded as
as those who have opposed the new confidential upon request.
structure have charged. The handling
of the matter by all those concerned IT IS SUCCESSFUL!!!
-Coach Yost, the athletic board, the To the Editor:
committee of the University Senate, It seems that some misguided in-
and the Board of Regents-has been dividual signing as J. O., '28, in
much too sane for any such action. Wednesday's Daily, has been guilty

IDEA
Next season we are going to organ-
ize a company to tour Russia, Swe-
den, Siberia, Japan, China and India
playing "Abie's Irish Rose" in Eng-
lish. We will call ourselves the Sa-
line Art Theatre, and take names like
Smith and Jones. If we don't get to
meet the crown heads of all these
countries and aren't hailed as the
greatest theatrical company ever as-
sembled, then Americans are just a
bunch of easy -marks.
* * *
To make everything doubly safe,
we will call it "A Symbolic Drama."
* * .
OUR SCOOP DEPARTMENT
Best journalistic practice demands
competition in the gathering of news,'
and a wild rush always ensues to get
a piece of news into the paper before
your competitor prints it. Therefore,
Rolls, being a leader in everything,
comes to the front still another time
with the startling announcement that
it will "Scoop All The Papers All The
Time.'"
Not satisfied with scooping news-
papers, we will scoop the event itself.
This is height of journalistic achieve-
ment for many a paper, but for Rolls
it will only be routine stuff.
CAP NIGHT SCENE OF FLAME AND
FIRE AS FROSII BITRN POTS
AND TOAST FACES
Special to Rolls and allied news-
papers of the North and South Ameri-
can Newslesspaper Alliance.
With shouts of joy a'nd pain, 2,631
frosh tossed their pots toward the
flaming pile that formerly was pack-
ing boxes, at the Cap Night cere-
monies next month, in Sleepy Hollow.
Next month's celebration was the
biggest in history according to those
who say they know, but don't. The
crowd was estimated to number 20,101
andcompletely filled the amphitheater.
In an exclusive interview with
Rolls after the affair, President Little
said:
"This, my first Cap Night at Michi-
gan, has been a pleasant surprise. I
never believed that the Frosh were so
brave as to approach that flame, after
seeing their activity all the year. The
singing of the classes was wonderful,
but I was glad to have a copy of the
words so that I could keep track of
the passing of the classes into his-
tory."
President Coolidge refused to com-
ment.
The total amount of wood used in
the fire was 345 crates, of which 43
were slightly damaged when thrown

* * *
"THE GOOSE HANGS HIGH" I
As the third and final number of
the present PlaysProduction course,
Professor Hollister is presenting
Lewis Beach's comedy of Ameri4san
manners, "The Goose Hangs High,"
on Wednesday evening, April 28, in
University hall at eight o'clock. Only
one performance will be given instead
of two as originally announced, and
the cast has been selected as follows:
Barnard Ingal...... . ...Dale Shafer
Eunice Ingals (the Mrs. Mansfield
role)........Kathleen Chisholum
Noel Derby ..........Robert Wetzel
Leo Day ..............Edgar Finley
Rhoda .................. Anne Miller
Julia Murdock..........Luella Hoyt
Mrs. Bradley ...... Constance Clarke
Hugh Ingals ............Daniel Huff
Ronald Murdock .... Herbert Heuman
Lois Ingals .............. Edna Hill
Bradley Ingals .,..Richard Woellhaf
Dagmar Carroll..Margaret Henderson
Elliot Kimberly........Herbert Moss
VLADIMIR
NEMIROVITCH-DA NTCHENKO
The Moscow Art Theatre Musical I
Studio under the direction of Vladimir
Nemirovitch-Dantchenko are appear-
ing at the Shubert-Lafayette, Detroit,
for a week's run opening \Icnday
evening, April 26. The repertory will
include their adaptation of Bizet's
"Carmencita and the Soldier" and
Aristophanes' "Lysistrata."
The main purpose of the Musical
Studio has been to prepare its mem-
bers, combining in themselves the
abilities of singer, actor, and dancer,
for the portrayal of living characters
on the lyr'c stage. The development
of such "synthetic actors" has been
necessarily accomplished by progres-
sive steps in the mastery of the mu-
sical tone, the spoken word, mime,
and plastic.
In the Musical Studio's brief exist-
ence in the past five years through
the storms of revolution, civil war,
and starvation, it has solved brilliant-
ly some of the most important prob-
lems of operatic production, and has
grown into the sole institution of the
art of the lyric drama not only in
Russia, but in the whole world.
THE STUDENTS' RECITAL
Miss Gertrude Frederich, violinist,
and Hazel Corbett, soprano, will pre-
sent the following Students' Recital
this evening in the School of Music
auditorium at eight o'clock:l
Chaconne, from the Fourth Solo-
Sonata.....................Bach
Miss Friedrich
When Roses Bloom........Reichardt
Dedication ...................Franz
O Sleep. Why Dost Thou Leave
.e? .................... H andel
Miss Corbett
Ballade et Polonaise, Op. 38...
....... . ............ Vieuxtemps
Miss Friedrich
Accompanists: Pauline Kaiser and
Marjorie Baxter.
* * *
3XIE. MILESSI
The following program will be
given in Lane Hall auditorium on
April 27 at 8:00 o'clock by Mme.
Milessi, contralto:
In German-
Der Schmid ................. Brahms
Die Klage..................Brahms
Geheimnis................Schubert
Volkslied.................... Mittler

HALLER'S
STATE STREET JEWELERS
Visit Our Optical Department
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR
Men's Used ClothingI
or any other ARTICLE OF VA UE
STUDENT TAiLOR HOP
Phone 8040 Cer. N. Univ. & Thayer

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
'PATH S
ON T HE
CA MPU S

How Did
Your Garters
Look
This Morning?

AGRIPPA -WVB makes garters act in an
entirety new way-and only in Bostons can
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In many pleasing colors, 50c the pair.

GEORGEFr'IOGT COMPANY
MAKERS
BOSTON

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Skidding Garters!

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WANT.A
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that looks like new, and
runs fine, with balloons on,
for $398.00.
Or a late model Dodge
C o u p e, like new, for
$435.00. If so, see your
Chevrolet dealer at once.

9AMNMMM

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DjON'T FORGET]
That the Best
DOLLAR SUNDAY
CHICKEN DINNER
in Town
Can only be secured at the
L a ne H all Tavern
This place, which has re-opened under new manage-
ment, is bound to become the dining room of connoisseurs of
good foods.
After one trial, our good service and reasonable prices
will insure your steady patronage.
Tickets, which can be used any time, and good for
fourteen excellent meals can also be obtained for only six
dollars.
A Nice Cool Place.
Special attention given to parties.

Dial 9314

cor. Ashley

Dial 9314
Cor. A i'ley & Huron

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Luncheon
11:30-1:00

Sunday Dinner
12:00-2:00

Dinner
5:30-7:00

momma

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_.. . . i _ _.. _...

What was made possible by the action
of the Regents on Thursday night was
the erection of a stadium, outside of
the area of Ferry field, capable of
seating those who have every right to
watch Michigan teams play football.
if they so desire-students, parents
faculty, alumni, and the friends ofI
the University throughout the state.E
And Ferry field, which is closer to the
campus, has been made available for
use in the development of intramural
work, which was enthusiastically zip-
proved in the Regents' report.
It has been a long struggle, with
the obvious deficiencies of the present
plant at Ferry field becoming more
apparent each year. It has been set-
tied, after long consideration, in a
manner that cannot be opposed by
those who desire to see Michigan$
grow, as the entire country is grow-
ing, in the development of clean sport,
both intercollegiate and intramural.
The financing of the new structure
will be handled entirely by the ath-
letic department, and will not hinder
lhe expansion of other branches of j

1
,}
t
f
l

of stating, yea verily, and having pub- on. Due to lack of space we can't list
lished statements whose coefficients the speakers and their remarks, but
of veracity approach zero. It is, my! anyway they were good.
belief that he is rather misinformed Timothy Hay.
with regard to the success with which * * *
the honor system of taking examina- A CO-ED'S CONFESSION
tions meets. He calls the system a I.
failure in our Engineering College. I The men I love 'em, darling things,
am a part of that Engineering Col- They kid me nice, and give me rings,
lege and feel called upon to right any But still I often' wonder why

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We are headquarters for the most pouular gar-
ment on the campus and are showing all styles in
YELLOW and OLIVE KHAKI, also Trans-
parent and in colors, for ladies, men, boys and girls.
Our prices will interest you.
Also Cravenettes, Gabardens and Topcoats from

)

4

wrong impression he may have while I always am within their eye.
he is still young on the campus. 1.
JT cannot recall any case in which I admit I date, perhaps I love it,
I saw anyone in the Engineering Col- I wish to h-1, I were above it,
lege cheating on examinations during But then you see, I still am nice,
my brief sojourn on the campus. We And hate to be a piece. of ice.
may talk, smoke, go out for walks III-
together, but we i'eligiously refrain But after all is said and done,
from any discussion of matters con- Each lass must have her chance at
cerning the examiination we are tak- fun,
ink. Probably a small amount of And if it does amuse my soul
cheating is done, but I have not seen To make a face at men so droll,
it. I would gladly wager however Why then I shall: just try and stop
that we have less cheating with our me,
honor system than J. O., '28, does in And you will find that I may bopp
his college with the profs in the . thee. MICHAEL.
rooms. Perhaps J. O., '28, refers to Coed '29:-
the use of texts during examinations, 'Note. These confessions were not

$15.00 up.

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a large assortment in grey and tan for ladies and men

Blouses, Blazers and Spoit Coats in popular patterns.

Our prices are as

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1 1

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