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April 21, 1926 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-21

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1926

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1926 X'AG~ FIVt

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PROPOSE PLAN ,TO
j Pres. Little And Alumnae Council
Agree On Plans For Cbmpletlon
Of Building Fund

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TO RAISE $500,000

Plans for raising the last half mil-
lion dollars toward the Women's
league building fund based on the
financial report of the campaign up
to March 1, 1926, were presented and
passed by the executive council, theI
advisory board and the investment
board at a joint meeting yesterday.
President Clarence Cook Little presid-
ed at the meeting and those present
exhibited a great deal of enthusiasm
over the prospects for the completion
of the $1,000,000 necessary before the
ground can be cleared and the build-
ing started.
According to the report given
March 1, there are $313,856.61 in the
fund, although there have been many
payments since that date that will be
included in a later report. There are
on the files, pledges amounting to
$525,000 which means that there is a
little less than the $500,000 left to
raise. The money which has been so
far accumulated has been invested by
the University investment board and
is bearing from 6 to 7 per cent.
Although these figures are encour-
aging, the task which remains is large
enough, when it is considered that
there is little more than one year in
which to complete the total. The plan
which the alumnae, council, supported
by the other boards and endorsed by
President Little is as follows: First,
to raise $300,000 through volunteer
group pledges from ten groups each
willing to pledge $10,000 to be paid
within the next three years, from 20
groups each willing to pledge $5,000
to be paid within three years, and
from a sufficient number of groups
willing to pledge a sum of from $500
to $4,000 to make up the additional
$100,000, and to be paid within three
years. Second, to raise the remaining
1200,000 through special gifts, the re-
sponsibility of which falls upon Mrs.
W. D. Henderson as executive secre-
tary of the alumnae council.
This has been explained to the
alumnae groups of the country and so
far the support has been enthusiastic
and some have already decided upon
their pledge toward the last $500,000.
PARIS.- Capt. Rene Fonck, who
plans to fly from New York to Paris
this fall, sails for America tomorrow.
Patronize Daily Ayvertisers.-Adv.

Cast Of Pageant
Start Rehearsals
Rehearsals for the Freshman pa-
geant are starting this week, and a
schedule has been arranged which will
be followed until the presentation of
it on Lantern night. The subject was
chosen from the introduction to "The
Life of Michael Angelo," by Romaine
Rolland, and allows those in the pro-
duction to present a great variety of
moods and color in the dancing and
costuming.
The schedule which is permanent
unless a special announcement is
made in the Daily is as follows: Mon-
day-Dreams at 4 o'clock, Doubts at
5 o'clock, Courages at 7 o'clock; Tues-
day-Joy at 4 o'clock, Jester, Bells
and Maidens at 5 o'clock, Beauty at
7 o'clock; Wednesday-Dreams at 41
o'clock, Toil at 7 o'clock; Thursday-
Doubts at 4 o'clock, Courages and
Grief at 5 o'clock, Joy at 7 o'clock;
Friday-Beauty at 4 o'clock, Jester,
'Bells and Maidens at 5 o'clock; Sat-
urday-Toil at 10 o'clock, Grief at 11
o'clock.
"Co-clubs" are what is needed in
this world, declares Mrs. Ida Clyde
Clarke, of New York; clubs that have
both men and women members work-
ing together for the common good.

ANNOUNCE PLANS FORl
AlINTRIMURAL BASEBALL
All houses expecting to play in the
annual intramural baseball tourna-
ment this season must sign up this
week on the poster in Barbour gymna
slum and procure entry blanks which
will be due back next Monday. Ac-
cording to Miss Pauline Hodgson, ofI
the physical education department it
was planned at first to use the same
system for the baseball tournament
that was used for the basketball
tournament, but due to the lack of
time it will be impossible to use the
same system, and a double elimination
tournament will be run off instead.
Practices will start this week and
will be held at 4 o'clock on Wednes-
days and Fridays. A 12 inch ball will
be used in all practices and games.
Lydia Kahn, '27, is intramural mana-
ger, and Harriet Donaldson, '27, is W.
A. A. baseball manager for the sea-
son.
RIO JANERIO.-Rear Admiral Alex-
andrino Alencar, minister of marine,
is dead.
Patronize Daily Ayvertisers.-Adv.

Detroit Alumnae I
Meet At Luncheon
More than 500 Detroit alumnae met
Saturday, April 17, at a luncheon in
the crystal room of the Book Cadillac
hotel for the annual meeting of all
the branches of the alumnae associa-
tion of the city, and President Clar-
ence Cook Little gave the address of
the meeting which followed. His mub-
ject was "Education for Women."
Mrs. W. D. Henderson, executive-I
secretary of the alumnae council
spoke about the Women's league work
with the campaign for the .new build-
ing. They hope by their new plan to
raise the remaining $500,000 before,
June, 1927. This will be announced
as soon as final arrangements can be
made.

NOTICES t
All women planning to enter the
tennis tournament must sign up ont
the poster in Barbour gymnasium be-
fore Saturday noon. The first roundI
of the tournament will be played next
week.
Women who wish to enter the golf
'tournament which will be held in
May, are requested to sign on the
poster in Barbour gymnasium.
Mrs. Henderson also visited the
Flint alumnae group during the last
week and met with the various com-
mittees. It is interesting to note that
the men's organization of Michiganz
men are planning to assist the womenc
in covering whatever pledge they<
finally decide upon.

Michigan playing cards may be ob-
tained at Hill auditorium between 9
and 5 o'clock today.
Kappa Phi, national Methodist so-
rority, will hold a special business
meeting at 7 o'clock tomorrow at Wes-
ley hall at which election of officers
and delegates to the national conven-
tion will take place.
May morning breakfast committee
will meet at. 4 o'clock today at New-
berry hall.
To Begin Practice
For Track Meet,
Instruction in track will begin im-
mediately and classes have been sche-
duled from 4 to 6 o'clock Tuesdays
and Thursdays at Palmer field.
A track meet has been planned for
the spring season, to includethe fol-
lowing events: discus and javelin
throw, 50 yard and 75 yard dashes,
running broad jump, running highj
Sump, standing broad jump, baseball
throw, basketball trow, and hurdle.

Seniors To Hold
Tryouts For Play
Senior Women's Play tryouts will be
held today and tomorrow from 3 to 5
o'clock in Newberry hall auditorium.
The play that has been chosen by the
senior women for presentation at the
Senior breakfast in June, Is "The
Glass Slippers That Broke Them-
selves," by Marie Drennan. Mrs.
Stanley Lowe will direct the produc-
tion, in which only senior women will
take part.
Marguerite Ainsworth, '26, is gen
eral chairman of this play. Ruth
Rankin is the chairman of the prop-
erty with Elizabeth Strauss in charge
of the costumes.
Although the meet -will be a class
affair, it will include an intramural r-e-
lay.
The first woman to cross the Afri-
can continent from one end to the
other is ?Nlme. Delingette, of Paris.

I.

- w .r - -. - -. l
Nearly time now for the annual migration to "gay
Paree" and London town, and most of the college
crowd are going via
TOURIST THIRD CABIN

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FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES
It is now time to be thinking
of getting copy ready for your
Spring House Papers and
other printed material.

w ..

ithat ocalow
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SEE US for an estimate on
PRINTING

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Way

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Round $
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professional men and women and similar vacationists.

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Four other splendid ships from Montreal and two from Boston,
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Second Class on our great ships also offers exceptional values
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Springtime demands
your clothing look its

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White Swan

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Cleaning and Press-

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economical, too.
Dial 4287
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THE NEW
PORTABLE
Extraordinary volume and wonder-
ful tone quality feature the new
Brunswick Portable.
Durable and compact, with space
for records,, light and easy to carry,
attractively finished in sage brown
leatherette with silver gray lining.
This new Portable is ideal for
week-end parties, motor trips, camp-
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and for the home.
Plays all records perfectly, includ-
ing the new electrical "Light-Ray"
recordings recently developed by
Brunswick.
The new Brunswick Portable is
a wonderful little instrument, built
to last, inexpensive, and most con-
venient in providing entertainment
when and where you want it.
We are now displaying this attrac-
tive new Portable for the first time,
Hear and see it. No obligation.

com Sunrise to Suset
Eummer So es Wend,
c erJ Co rful Wa
Every color of the rainbow finds its way into the
brilliant garment mode of 1926-black, red, green,
rose; grey, and a wealth of gorgeous hued prints in

all-over br border designs.

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Mack shoes take note of every 'need in styles
and colors, and combinations of colors for
every sunlit hour-and for the evening too!
Sauturne, parchment, ivory and grey are the
newest footwear shades to wear with the
lovely colored summer frocks. Patent leather,
always smart, and white kid which is just
making its appearance are next rivals for
popularity. Applique and attractive combina-
tions make our new footwear most interesting.

$6.50

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