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April 21, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-21

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' 'A rE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY APRIL 21, 1929

Published every morning except Monday
ts..ng the University year by the Board in
(wtclof .Student Publications.
Members oA Western Conterence Editorial
A',suciation,
'hc Associated Press is exclusively en-
ci' to the use for republication of all news
(:: ,;arches credited to it or not otherwise 3
Sdited in this paper and the local news pub-
h(d therein
bEnitred- at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
t c.Iician,. as second class matter. Special rate
r postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
L~-stcr General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
Ofiees: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
mird Street.
hones: Editorial, 4q25;% ainess ,112 1,
lITOR1AL STAFIV
Telephone 1924
MANAGING EDITOR
uEORGE W. DAVIS
C'air man, Editorial Board....Norman R. Thal
[yrEditor .......Robert S. Mansfield
%_'ws Editor...........Manning Housewortb
W'mn's Editor........Helen S. Ramsay
- ~ '~Editor...............oseph, Kruger
S<raph .Editor.......Wiliam Walthour
and Drama......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
+iaithl H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
..lwert 1T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
lkwir Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants

resentation, it is quits conceivable
that various ,groups, being assured a
voice in student bodies, would join in
support of its actions with greater
celerity, and perhaps enthusiasm,
than is at present the case. Certainly
some such scheme is worth a trial,
especially in a community where stu-
dents are being trained, some of them,
to take part in state and national
campaigns of coming years.
JOKE ?
Practical jokers are a singuar af-
fliction of mankind. Each poeople has
its particular kind and, it is likely
that they shall ever be with us, play-
ing their little pranks much to the
consternation and discomfiture of
other persons, resulting sometimes in
more or less serious injuries for the
"butt of the joke." But sometimes a
"butt" is found who is too quick for
the joker, and it is the latter who
suffers-sometimes exterminated, as
was one of this clan in New York last
week.
AkBrooklyn butcher, John Seles,
was held up one day last month andf
forced to stand by while his masked
visitor cleaned out his cash 'register.
That could not be helped, but the
good butcher was determined to be
prepared for another hold-up.
Last week, a taxi driver, John
Kirschner, the practical joker, decided
to play his daily prank on the butcher
by frightening him into believing he
was being robbed again. He entered
the shop to purchase his meat for the
evening meal, and walking quietly
back of butcher, he shouted, "Hands
up; get into the ice box." Then he
prepared to laugh. But-
Butcher Seles suddenly whirled
about and drove a heavy meat cleaver,1
which he was using at the time, deep
into the base of the joker's skull,
severing neck muscles and three large
veins. eH was rushed to the hospital.
Later, as he was nearing death, he
murmured, "I was ony fooling."
Afterward, when the butcher heard
of the remark, he burst out in anger,
not sorrow, "A joke, eh? What a
joke, I'd say! What does he think I
should do-laugh?" ,
Everyone of the clan "practicalii
{ jokeri" can learn a lesson from this
little incident-to make practical
jokes light, so if they are inflicted on
themselves by mistake they may be
able to bear them.

TOASS' ROLLS
CLOG
MYSTERY
SOLVED S

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA

GAA

r I

trude Bailey
' a Des Bebymer
iC rge Berneike
%V'Jliain Breyer
v'iilip C. Brooks
arnumnBuckingham
SIo'atton Buck.
Carl Burger
Edgar Carter
Joseph Chamberlain
M4:eyer Cohen
t rketon Champe
D~ouglas Doubleday
u agene H. Gutekunst
Andrew Goodman
ames T. Herald
i lesKimball
Marion Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnan
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

;:
"-

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYXRON W. PARKER
Advertising..............Joseph J. Finn
..Rudol B o0telmanl
Advertising.......... . "... Wmi. L. Mullin1
.....s..Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
4 ! jl(atfr')... ............James R, Del'uy
............. FrankaRs Dentz, Jr.
,...ounts. .....Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

'George H. Annable, Jr.
,:'arl -Hauier
Hn .iobrink
l 1' C-o 'dingtAn
lt ion A" Daniei

Frank Masher
E. A. N orquist
Loleta G. Parkee
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wm. C. Pusch

7

1
h

r

Mary F'lntermafl ne arwe .i"
Si an Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
'1. enet aven Wi. J. Weinma
Vi l .lat,~l; "Margaret Smith
Oscar A. Jose Sidney Wilson
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 21, 1926
Night Editor-SMITH H. CADY, JR.
BATTER UP!
Spring is here officially this after-'
nvon when the opening baseball game,
with 'Michigan State, is-held on Ferry
.,eld. The team has returned from a
31ring trip throughout the south on
whlich it woni five of its eight games,
and is all primed for a season of real
baseball.
There will be no special trains from
Detroit carrying spectators for the
opener; there will be no ticket scalp-
4rs; there will be no alumni reunions
it the Union; but there will be a col-
lege baseball game, played with col-
lege spirit, with college rooters.
PLURALITY VS. MAJORITY I
In municipal and national politics
fffort is always made to give elected
candidates a majority vote, and fail-
ing that, political scientists lament
Ihl fact that elections are not so heldj
that candidates will be named to office
only by support of the majority. Fur-
ther, to give this majority, and also
to provide representation' for as manyj
considerable groups as exist in the
electorate, various schemes of election
have been devised. Included in these
schemes are various plans of prefer-
ential voting.
In campus elections, however, "prac-
Sical politics" have made no inroads:
voting still follows the archaic plan
whereby candidates with the highest
total vote are declared elected. In a
University center, where eminent po-
litical scientists teach the need and
the value for improved means of
voting, should not some improvement
be made in methods of voting? Per-
haps the adoption of some scheme of
preferential voting, especially for
offices where several are elected to
represent the student body, might af-
ford some relief.
Under these various plans, students
may indicate their choice of candi-
dates for the office in question, nam-
ing one man as first choice, another
as second, and so on. From the total
vote cast then is determined the
quota, or the number of votes neces-
sary to elect. Should a candidate fail
to receive a sufficient number of first
choice votes, then second choices are
taken into consideration, until the re-

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential uponu request.
HOW COULD IT WORKg
To the Editor:
Has the Honor system in examina-
tions any chance? It is my personal
opinion and that of students to whom
I have talked about it, that it hasn't,
at Michigan. Everybody seems to
agree that it would be a fine idea but
no one has as yet pointed out anyuni-
versity similar to our own in which'
the system works. While it is true
that at Princeton and Virginia the
system has been found successful, it
must be remembered that at these in-
stitutions there exists a homogenous
student body, while at Michigan we
have an exceedingly heterogenous
group. We have here no compact
school spirit beyond that manifested
at a few functions during the year, no
established code of conduct, and it is
the opinion of many that our tradi-
tions fall far short of what they might
be. When we have these last, then
an honor system in examinations
conceiveably succeed.
It is certainly beyond the compre-
hension of many engineering students
how the authorities of that college can
overlook the cheating that goes on
during examinations. It is common
knowledge that it persists. Only a
mistaken sense of loyalty, disgust, or
disinclination prevents students from
bringing to justice any dishonest in-
dividuals who have cheated. The
Engineering college is not unlike any
other college of the campus in any
important respect. If the system will
not work in that college, how can it
be expected to work out elsewhere in
the University?
After all, is it really an honor sys-
tem? Would we not be merely shift-
ing the control of the examinations
from the faculty to the students? It
is absurd to say that cheating would
automatically cease when the stu-
dents were put "on their honor." I
think anyone will agree with me that
the students could handle the problem
less efficiently than the faculty, and
that the honest students who study
would be placed at a great disadvan-
tage under a system allowing the
cheater ample opportunity to ply his
trade.
Just what would we gain by a
transfer of authority? What we
would have would be simply a situa-
tion where the honest majority would
be taut at a 2great disadva~nltge by theo

Well, we found out what those
original clogs were. One of the girls
in the office who seems to really know
about those things, said that it was
this way: Most of the dances used
in amateur shows and what-not, so
her explanation goes, are stereotyped,
trite, banal, bromidic, or what would
you. So what the person advertising
in~g for the original clogs really want-
ed was original steps in clog dancing.
We blush to confess that we thought
original clogs were a sort of rare first
edition of dancing shoes. We had an
idea it must mean that the advertiser'
was trying to get hold of the first
pair of shoes Marilyn Miller or Fan-
nie Brice wore on the stage. We told
this supposition to the young lady
who was giving us the real dope on
them. No, she said, you can clog-
dance in any kind of shoe. I can't, we
replied, I can't clog dance at all. I
So that closes the clog question.
But we are still trying to find out who
Aurora is.
* * *
We wish to apologize for the con-
clusion of yesterday's column. It
really wasn't our fault that we had to
end up with an expression which by
now is as hackneyed as the joke
about the stockbroker and the chorus-
girl. But our time :was limited, and
Michael, who perpetrated the gag,
couldn't think of anything else to
substitute for it.
, We believe we made a mistake in
taking that heredity course. It's not
the work that bothers us. We never
allow ourselves to be worried by
studies. But it is the awful nerve-
racking experience of trying to figure
out the grades we receive on the blue-
books. This is the way they work it.
You get two points for every question
you answer correctly, one point is de-
ducted for every one left out, and two
taken off for every mistake made
But how do they get that way? One
of the best minds in the class (not
ourselves) computed that if he didn't
answer anything at all, he ought to
get 50 per cent. If he wrote fifteen
questions correctly he should get 35
per cent plus 30 per cent for the right
answers which would be a pretty ef-
fortless way of getting a passing
grade. He followed this system, and
now he's beginning to worry...... So
are we. If anyone sees a person with
snow-white hair and a wild look in
his eyeq wandering around, it is prob-
ably this sufferer from complicated
grading systems.
* * *
A COINCIDENCE
The two things published below
were received in this office within hall
an hour of each other. We use them
for whatthey are worth and, without
making any comment, will let them
speak for themselves:
In the Spring....-.
1.
The red hot sun was shining down
Upon my blistering, tired crown
That sparkled in the noon-day light
As I began my upward flight.-
2.
I floated on o'er hill and dale,
' Across the town, beyond the jail:-
Until upon yon Huron, there
I saw in truth a lovely pair.
3.
Their heads were close ,so too thei
eye
When unto them I gave a cry
"Avaunt, arise, and be like us,"
You oughta heard the dumb-bell
cuss.
4.
"Get out a here!" yelled young Si
Twain.
And I went on, in greatest pain,
For I was sad that two should love
Right in the sight of me above.

MICIAEL.
r A Protest
To the Editor of ROLLS:
I may be only one of the female
species, but I must enter a protest
I against some of the male student
who insist upon taking stag trips tc
the vicinity of the Huron.
Only yesterday some goofy looking
individual, whose nose preceded hin
by fifteen minutes, and whose car
hung on one ear, rushed by my sister
and myself, yelling, "Avaunt, arise
and be like us."
If spring ha§ so affected this poor
unfortunate (and I would just love tc
learn his identity) that he cannot stay
sane, please let him be confined to the
psychopathic ward.
CO-ED, '29.
* * *
-atque Yale........
Yifnif.

I

THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian will present the
following organ recital in Hill audi-
torium this afternoon at four-fifteen
o'clock:
Phantasie(Sonata in D fiat,
Op. 154)...........Rheinberge
Adante Cantabile (Symphony V)
Tschaikowsky
Scherzo-Caprice ...............Ward
Prelude and Fuge on BACH.... Liszt
Prelude in D flat (Op. 28, No. 15)
Chopin
In Springtime . Kinder
Benediction ..............Karg-Elert
"YOU NEVER CAN TELL"
As a fitting culmination to an un-
precedented list of campus dramatic
successes the Comedy Club production
of Bernard Shaw's four act comedy
"You Never Can Tell" bids fair to cap
the climax. "You Never Can Tell" is
Shaw's response to the demand for the
brilliancy of "Arms and the Man" and
"Man and Superman" in a form more
considerate of the exactitudes of the
theatrical production, particularly the
fashionable west end theatres of Lon-
don. Herein is proved that fun, a
chance for handsome frocks, society
manners, the much ordering of drinks
in a polite way from the always-if-
possible comic waiter, may, in the
proper hands, prove quite as human-
izing, as de-humanizing in incom-
petent hands, of course the comedy is
more than this: Shaw merely, dis-
guises this devastating wit, and lu-
cious humor in the chic form of the
i fashionable society comedy.
The plot concerns the martial es-
trangement of a worthy lady liberal,
or more exactly, radical, who brings
up her children in ignorance of their
fathers identity. The two younger
children unwittingly invite their
father to luncheon, and complications
naturally ensue. Mr. Crampton the
father is not endowed with a partic-
ularly lovely disposition and his wife,
Mrs. Clandon, is unenthusiastic con-
cerning the reconciliation proposed
and urged by the family solicitor. The
solution of the problem is carried out
in a typical Shavian fashion, largely
through the devices of the superlative
waiter, who moves quietly but
poigantly through the action. The ro-
mantic element is not neglected, and
involves a young dentist and the eld-
est daughter of Mrs. Clandon and, of
course, of Mr. Crampton, as he him-
I self remarks.
The cast is excellent, including the
best of the campus players. The role
of the waiter, carried by Robert Hen-
derson, seems to promise another im-
peccable characterization to that
galaxy of characters which include the
great Belinda, Patiomkin, and Jeppe,
The play is under the direction of
that truly admirable, and meticulous
director, J. Raleigh Nelson, who has
been responsible for the many Com-
edy Club successes in the past, and
whose work in past years has been
like a ray of light in the general
mediocrity of the "campus theatre."
** a. *
STUDENTS' RECITAL
A students' recital will be given in
the auditorium of the School of Music
Wednesday evening at eight o'clock,
by 'Olive Wilbur, 'cellist, and Belva
Tibbals, pianist.
* * *
WHITNEY THEATER
Two productions have been sched-
uled for the Whitney theater for the
near future which are of interest to
theater goers on the campus. They
are Margaret Anglin and company in
"Caroline" which will be given Mon-
day, April 26, and Lawrence Stallings
and Maxwell Anderson's war comedy,
"What Price Glory," which will be
given on Wednesday, April 28.

Margaret Ansglin will be remember-
ed as co-starring with William Faver-
sham in Zoe Akins' "Footloose" which
was given at the Whitney theater last
spring and also in the better-known
"Woman of Bronze" which ran for
considerable time in New York some
time ago.
"What Price Glory" which has just
finished a three weeks run at the Gar-
rick theater in Detroit, although the
same company will not present the
play in Ann Arbor, is a comedy of life
in the trenches during the war. It is
highly amusing, and has three very
clever characters who have interesting

THIS AFTERNOON: The Organ.
Recital In Hill auditorium at 4:151
o'clock.
THIS AFTERNOON: The Matinee
Musicale in the Michigan Union ball-
roomi at 3:30) o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Students' Recital in
the School of Music auditorium at 8
o'clock.

218 E. Huron

SENIORS

Consult us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement,

Phone 3432

Spring is the
Time to Beautify
the Home!
Let Harding re-cover your
furniture with attractive de-
signs and colorings.
P. B. Harding

GRAHAM'S BOOK STORES
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL

A

MAN S co rIE N
Good Hats
That Is What We Make.
None Better
WE CLEAN AND BLOCK HATS.
HAVE YOUR WORK DONE AT OUR
FACTORY.
1A1TII CLASS WORK ONLY.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7416.

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SKILLED REPAIRING

SUP
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DON'T
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ON THE
CAMPUS

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wears out.
SeevIce',
Right
here by
Fountain himself.

Lj44 JR~

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Pen Shop

Ann

315 State St.
Arbor, Mich.
L SERVICE

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Read The Daily

"Classified" Columns

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IRSCHBAT
ver T'he Co

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Et "Dressi

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o"4pp roved &Iodels
TWO PAIRS
TROUSERS
The college man has own ideas about
clothes. He follows the general style
trend closely, but the variations he favors
set his own styles apart from the field.
The talented]Kirschbaum designers have
served the college man's needs perfectly
in this season's productions. Not
through guess work, but by a careful,
critical style-study in university centers.
One of the new models is here pictured.
It is happily named the College."
Developed in rich virgin wool fabrics-
presenting the newest pattern effects and
color tones -many of them exclusive.

rl

Rider's
"Masterpen"
In every way a more satis-
factory pen.

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