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April 20, 1926 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-20

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TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 1926. THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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DELEGATES LEAVE NOTED DANCER

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91[G9[S ERE NWCODANCER
WILL CONDUCT
FOR Yowl CONCLAV LOCAL CLASSES

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Six Members Of Local Organization
lvill Attend Convention' In
Milwaukee, Wis.
PAGEANT"TO BE FEATURE
Delegates from the local organiza-
tions of the Y. W. C. A. will leave to-
day for Milwaukee, Wis., where they
will attend the national convention of
the association which is being held
this week. Six delegates from here
will attend.
Sarita Davis, '27, one of the mem-
tbers of the national student council
of the Y. W. C. A., left Sunday for
Racine, Wis., to attend a two day's
meet for the purpose of arranging the
preliminaries of the convention. This
assembly meets in order to make the
student assembly of the convention
more free for discussing the purpose
of the association.
The first student assembly will be
held at 10:30 o'clock Wednesday in
the Milwaukee auditorium, and the
convention will be formally opened
at 2:30 o'clock. The assembly will
be opened by Miss Rachael Dunaway,
chairman of the student assembly.
The opening addressswillnbe given by
Rheinhold Niebuhr of the Detroit
Evangelical church. After this ad-
.dress the assembly will break up in-
to smaller discussion groups.
One of the features of the conven-
tion this year will be the pageant,
"Forward Through the Ages," in
which more than 800 women will take
part. The pageant will represent wo-
men's progress since the pre-Chris-
tian era.
Delegates to the convention besides
Miss Davis are: Nellie Becker, '28, An-
na Arnold, '27; Miss Ruth Deemer,
secretary of the University Y. W. C.
A.; 'Mrs. L. I. LBredvold;. and Miss
Elizabeth Brown, '28, from the nurses
branch of the Y. W. C. A.
The theme of the convention is to
be "The Association - Whither
Bound?" Representatives from more
than 1,102 associations will gather at
the convention and more than 2,500
delegates are expected to attend. The
officers in charge of the th'ree assem-
blies come from every walk of life,
and the women working on the com-
4nittees for the industrial assembly
are women who are in the ranks of in-
dustrial employment. Those on the
committees for the national student
assembly are from the universities and
colleges. Business women make up
the committee in charge of the busi-
ness and professional women's assem-
bly. Reports from the different as-
sociations will be given and problems
of the organization will be discussed.
The convention. is being divided into
separate assemblies this year to make
it easier to carry on these discussions.

Under the direction of Charles Ra-
bold, the institute of English folk-
dancing will be in session here from
April 21 to April 25. Classes will be
heldin Barbour gymnasium for two
or three hours each day during this
time, while some of the instruction
will be given in Ypsilanti.
Mr. Rabold has studied with Cecil
Sharpe who is the originator of the
English folk-dance movement. Mr. Ra-
* bold is one of the two men in theI
i United States who has worked under
I him. Mr. Rabofd is bringing with him
the traditional customs and music of
the dances. Besides the regular folk-
dancing, the institute also teaches
country dances, Morris, and sword
dances.
Anyone who is interested in the
classes may attend, including faculty,
students, nurses, and secretaries. The
hours will be in the late afternoon
and evening. Only a small fee is to
be charged.
RETURN FROM VACTION1
DISPLAY NEL FINERY
An increasing number of reads pop
from the front windows every time
the taxi or the bus stops at the door.
Squeals of joy and excitement greet
the newcomer; she is smothered in a
sea of "did you have a nice time,"
"what did you do", what did you get"
and sundry unintelligible shrieks and
babblings.
Somehow or other, out of tha flurry,
it is made plain to the latest arrival
that she is to show her new clothes.
Mary got some of those snappy new
shoes (every different shade of tan
Imaginable!) in New York, Peg got a
darling hat in Chicago and Betty
brought back a white fox fur which
makes every girl in the house look
to her wardrobe and plan a new out-
fit which includes Betty's fur. Of
course, clothes aren't all important-
but no one brought back any books
or fancy work, and when Jane asked
who had gotten any work done silence,
for the first time, reigned in the room.
After unpacking her clothes, and a
little pressing session, the next thing
in the line of action is to don the new
outfit and parade across the campus.
"Van's isn't open," is greeted with dis-
appointment, for one must eat, and to
seek for such a place is the first wor-
ry to vex the carefree vacation mind.
It's great to be back at school-but'
ye gods! Those theses! Those pa-
pers! Those books! Truly, the best
part of vacation may be the coming
back-but after the return (as Louis
or Napoleon or whoever he was so
aptly put it)-the deluge.
Eleven women are running in Illi-

VOE'S LEAGUE HOLDS
NATINALCONVENTION
Women voters, from almost every
state in the country, met in St. Louis
for the seventh annual convention of
th'e National League of Women Voters.
This is the third time, in the history
of the league, that delegates have
gathered in a middlewestern state.
A brilliant array of nationally-
known speakers and subjects of ab-
sorbing interest made up a program
which covered thirty regular sessions
and conferences, and included ten din-
ners and luncheons. More than 'one
hundred speakers, including league
menbers, participated in discussions
relating to -the principal issues of the
league's program.
The women voter's interest in fin-
ance was featured at a gala finance1
dinner on the evening of April 12th
at which an address was given ;by
David R. Forgan, of Chicago, vice
chairman of the National Bank of thF,
Republic, on "Women and Finance", I
another feature of this evening was
the presentation of "A Treasurer's Re-
port by Robert Benchley, of New YorkI
city, a distinguished author and hum-
orist, nationally known for his dra-
natic criticisms appearing in "Life."'
Miss Katharine Ludington, of Lyme,
Connecticut, treasurer of the league
acted as toastmistress.
Among the topics which had been
selected for discussion were: federal
aid, taxation, election laws, women'sj
wage problems, world peace and the
world court, methods of amending the
constitution, education, the legal sta-
tus ofvom.en, and immigration.
New voters, especially young women
in schools and colleges and three out-
standing women in public office weref
featured at the April 17 session. More

than 100 young college students par-
ticipated in special conferences on
that day, among them delegates from
three of Michigan's college leagues
at the University of Michigan.Michi-
gan State Normal College and Battle
Creek college. Mrs. John T. Pratt,
the only woman member of the New
York city board of aldermen, address-
ed delegates on "Being Practical in
a Party"; Mrs. J. Paul Goode, of the
Illinois legislature took "Let Women
Mind their Business" for her topic;
and Marie Wing, a member of the
Cleveland City council, discussed
"Sharing in Municipal Government."
Mile. Carlotta Zambelli, noted
French dancer, was recently given the
red ribbon of the Legion of Honor.
She is the first dancer to receive the
ribbon.

Alumnae To Open
Card Sale Today
Michigan playing cards will go on
sale today at Hill auditorium under
the auspices of the Ann Arbor chap-
ter of the Alumnae association. The
sales will be open to the public today
and tomorrow only.
Those who saw the playing cards
during the Christmas sale will remem-
ber their attractive appearance as
well as their high quality. They may
fbe obtained with either the blue or
yellow backs and are priced one dol-
lar per pack. Many have been order-
ing during this second sale for sum-
mer bridge parties as the cards and
cases are of a pattern that will grace
any table.

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NOTICES
Barbour gymnasium
There will be a meeting at 4 o'clock
today to elect track managers.
Baseball practice will be held today
at 4 o'clock for junior and sophomore
women and at 5 o'clock for freshmen
and seniors.
Newberry ball
The leadership commission of the
Y. W. C. A. will meet at 4 o'clock to-
day.
lay morning breakfast commnitte"
will meet at 4 o'clock tonmrrow.

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Our home cooked lunches

are

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sure to please you.
338 Maynard Street

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Phone 3839
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Phone 7355

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MICHIGAN

Let The Daily sell it for you thru nois as Republican or Democratic
the Classified columns.-Adv. didates for state legislature.

can-

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Visit England and Scotland-see the scenic
splendors ofthe lands of Shakespeare and Burns.
Visitez Paris, la ville de la gaiete, vivacite,
arts.
Bezoekt Holland--het land van tulpen er0
windmolens, van kanalen en dijken en boeren
op klompen.
Bezoekt Belgie, en aanschouwt de slagvelden
waardoor dit dappere kleine koninkrijk onster-
felijk is geworden.
Visitate L'Italia-Roma, il centro della piu
potente fede religiosa-Il Lago Di Como,pos-
sessore orgoglioso del pid glorioso ed incantevole
scenario del mondo.

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The Varsity Service

IS AS NEAR

As

Your Telephone

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Take a few rolls of Kodak Film-

SIX DELIVERY TRUCKS
READY TO SERVE YOU

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Part of the

excellence of the Varsity service lies

in the efficiency of its delivery system. Intelli-

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drivers guide the fleet of

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delivery trucks with promptness that is fitting.
Actually, the Varsity service is as near as your
telephone.

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April calls for spring pictures-and all pictures call for
dependable film in the yellow box. We'll supply the
you want in a jiffy, from the fresh stocks on our shelves.

Phone 4219

When you have exposed the films bring them

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