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April 20, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-20

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'A~ FOThR

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THE MICTIMfAMfDAILY

~TT1TEhAVA PRTT, f iS 9-lS~S t b.AV149.J;

111E lYl3 V.111 \1A1\ VA1L 1

1 EI.L %7L1.t3. Lt .t °'tLA.L.r L'rLfa 1;).;il. -

Published every morning except Monday
dw na the Unive:sity year by the Board in
Coitro f f student Pubicat ons.
e ibers .A Western Conference Editorial
At 5,ci tion,
re Associated Press is exclusively en-
tild to the rise for republication of all news
disPatches credited to it or not otherwise
eiedited ir. this paper and the local news pub-
:. te1 therein.
FEtered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
;1iehlgan, as second class matter. Special rate
;f postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
inaster General.
Sobscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$1.oo.
Otlices: Ana Arbor Press Building, May-
ard Street.
8-.anes- ditorlal, 49s; 3 Waiaes, a1214.
11,ITO IAL STAJF1
Telephone 49U.
MANAGING EDITOR
UEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman*Editorial Board.... Norman R. Thai
(i y j"ditor...........Robert S. Mansfield
w"Editor...........Manning Housewortb
'Vumeni's Editor............ Helen S. Ramsay
wt's Editor.............Joseph Kruger
'1graph Editor......William Walthour
_usic and Drama.......Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
* math . Cady Leonard C. Hall
r a-rt T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant Citydic Editors
Irwin Olian Feer H. Shillito
Assistants

Sir Henry Thornton, president ot
the Canadian National ralilwys, says,
"To my mind it is inconceivable that
a barrier shall exist or be permitted;l""{
to exist between the area of this great
inland sea and the ocean." Herbert TIFF IT FFI F
Hoover says, "It is inevitable and.

MUSIC
DRAMA

'i
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3
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GRAHAM'S

t,,trude Bailey
t Behymner
(C Orge, Berneike
%illiam Breyer
PEhlip. C. Brooks
3, arnui nBuckingham
Stratton Buck
arl .Burger
'(jgarCarter
sre~h Chamb~erlain
M dyer Cohen
'rtm nChanipt
') . TF Douibleday ,
1 1Gutekunst
1 ItIalid
Kubik

Harriett Levy
Ellis Merry
Dorothy M orehouse
Margaret Parker
Stanford N. Phelps
Archie Robinson
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
lvarguerite Zilske

I~lJ YSI sTA1

4:

Iu1IN :S5 MANArER
$IXRON W. PARKER
Alvertsing. . i, -... Joseph J. 'inn
r~tn............Wm. L. Mullin
A ,. U. 't Thonmas [.Olmsted, Jr
...........J aiesr WDel'u
1"(ile t ,m . .. - ... Franl1., entz, Jr.
Accounts..........-.........Paul WArnold
Asistants
George H. Aniable, Jr. Frank Mosher
W Carl. $auer F. A. Norquist
John . Bobriank Loleta G. Parker
J ti lington David Perrot
W J. Cox Robert Prentiss
Marion A. Daniel Wm. C. Pusch
Mary Flinterman Nnce So ,mon
Stanr Gilbert Thomas Sunderland
:. Kenneth Haven Wi . Weinman
ai i s arare Smith
(,a A. Jose Sidney Wilson
tISDAY, APRIL 20, 1926.
Night Edlitor--W. C. PATTERSON
DOWN TO TIE SEA-IN SHIPSc
Narrow minded criticism, quibbling,
mid selfishness, not to mention foolish
rmotionial propaganda, are some of
the obstructions to be met by the
Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Tidewatei
association in its attempt to carry out
a plan approved by eminent engineers
which will unquestionably multiply
the resources of the country.
There have been innumerable plans
for an outlet to the ocean from the
Great Lakes, and it is conceded by all
to be necessary. However, there is
only one really logical competitive
plan to the St. Lawrence waterway.
That is the New York barge canal.
Arguments in favor of the latter have
been presented time after time during
the hist few years, only to be over-
come by the supporters of the St.
Lawrence poject; nevertheless the
'mpoition holds out with the same
foolish, narrow minded ideas.
Disapproval in Canada, centered at
Montrneal and Quebec, dwells on the
point that Canada should not allow
cnals to be built or internationally
controlled in Canadian territory large-
ly for the benefit of American com-
m'erce. The opposition in America,
centered at New York, feels that we
are doing a foolish thing in diverting
money needed for the development o1
American waterways into an interna-
tional scheme. Although nothing is
said about it, New York's main argu-
ment is expressed in an editorial of a
Poughkeepsie paper, "Its construction
cdmc le adiectly opposite to the In-
terests of New York state."
From the standpoint of commercial
iMs, there can be no argument put
up for the New York barge canal. It
tas rroved since 1919 that so long an
artificial waterway can not be feasible.
There would be only 33 miles of canal
on the St. Lawrence project, as
^gainst 109 iles of canal and the 160
miles of restricted navigation on the
Hudson river. It is over 500 miles'
shorter to the European markets by
the way of the St. Lawrence than by
the New York barge canal, with three
locks as compared to 31 locks and 82
bridges on the "All-American" route.1
Supporters of the New York ship-4
way say that in case of war it would

only a question of when it will be un-
dertaken." If the opposition in both
Canada and America would take a
broader view of the subject, the St.
Lawrence shipway would be under-
taken that much earlier, and that
much earlier would the two coun-
tries, and the whole world, benefit by
its advantages.
THE BRITISH COAL CRISIS
With a nation-wide strike, involving
millions of people, in the offing, the
coal mining situation in England as-
sumes alarming possibilities with the
recent failure of negotiations between
operators and miners. The govern-
ment subsidy, which has been in effect
since last August, will expire Friday.
According to authentic reports it will
not be renewed. The miners refuse
to make further concessions to the
operators in working hours or wages,
and the operators flatly state that i
is iipossible for them to continue
under conditions demanded by the
workers. That a crisis exists is evi-
denced by the summons to conference
of Premier Stanley Baldwin by King
George, a procedure resorted to only
in serious situations.,
The British government realizes
full well the futility of continuing the
subsidy, and apparently will not grant
even a short continuance of it under
the name of temporary relief. This
policy seems by far the wisest, meeting
the situation squarely. Temporary ro
lief or a continuance of the subsidy,
in addition to being a drain on the
treasury, would augment the diii-'
eulties of solution in the future.
Premier Baldwin is devoting his
time almost entirely to the question.
and is earnestly endeavoring to avert
a castatastrophic crash. Perhaps
the knowledge of both workers and
operators that a nation-wide strike
would work havoc upon the country's
industries and bring irreparable loss-
es upon the British people will influ-
ence the parties to reach a compro-
mise agreement. A strike would gain
nothing,t
A name for the managers of sky-
scrapers and large office buildings is
to be found by a contest. Tenants
will submit names that won't be ac-
cepted.
Add Novel Occupations: A Univer-
sity of California student is guardian
for numerous germs used in the la -
boratories. He prepares their. meals
and generally looks after their health.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names Of coruni-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
AN ANSWER TO "FRESHMAN"
To the Editor:
"A Freshman" has become articu-
late; and my simmering indignation
has at last exploded. What has hap-
pened to the freshmen? They have
forgotten their status; they have cast!
aside humility; everywhere they can
be found loudly asserting their equal-
ity. If any caps are burned on Cap
Night, they will have to be dug out of
cedar chests; I so rarely see one worn
that I have forgotten their color. And
now a freshman, probably taking
Rabbi Wise's advice, becomes a "Re-
volting Youth."
You're right, Mr. Freshman. This
IS a serious problem. Not a problem
of giving the freshmen more, but
LESS, Tespect. The days when physi-
cal compulsion served as an ever
rejly reminder of his lowly state has
passed, and rightly so. Physically the

sophomore classes do not seem verile
enough to cope with the freshmen
hordes. But the upper classes ought
to exercise their prerogative. For this
physical must be substituted a moral
force, a moral force strong enough to
iill these frosh with humility, to keep(
those caps aired, to continue that
wholesome tradition of class inequal-
ity.
"A Freshman" wants "the freshmen
to be recognized on a basis of free-
;om, if not equality." The idea! As'
if a frosh ought to be given the same'
deference as oue who has climed the
ladder to a place of campus seniority.
Being brought "back to earth" is one=
of the most beneficial results of the
freshman year.
When Joe College, tour letter man
from Bohunk High, conies to college,
his head bursting with self import-
ance, his chest buldging with self ap-
proval, the most benign influence thatt
college has first to offer is to fill hun
with due humility, to separate hii

A wire came to the office this morn-
ing. We are trying to analyze the
reason for it. It runs something like
this:
EDITOR )1IH DAILY ANNARBOR
RETURNING LATE STOP LET YIF.
NIF PUT OUT ROLLS STOP HAVE
ARRANGED WITH HIM STOP WILL
BE BACK WEDNESDAY
TIFFIN.
The sort of thing that makes one
ponder. Of course Tifin had told
us that he was supposed to hold the
prompt-book or something like that
at a theatrical opening, but we read
in the paper that the show wasn't go-
ing to open until next week. And the
telegram says our boss will be back
day after tomorrow. (This is Monday).
Well, Toby will explain all when he
gets back. Meanwhile we have man's
work to do....
STEALING MENCKEN'S STUFF
ADD AMERICANA
Progress of literature in the Middle
West as revealed by a study of the
bulletin boards in one of the buildings
of Michigan State Normal school at
Ypsilanti:
LOST:
A pink silk scarff with panted ends.
Rewards.
WANTED:
Laundry work. Will call for and de-
liver. Work garnted.
COUGIIING AND SNEEZING
ARE DANGEROUS
U'se Handkerchief As Mask
* *.*
Those were not the only things we
gleaned from the bulletin boards at
the normal school. There were two
others that started us speculating.
One requested that "girls with origi-
nal clogs meet Monday at 4 p. m.
Room 12 ingym." Now here, we felt
with our reporter's sense for What Is
News, was somethi'gs gripping, some-
thing vital. Somebody in Ypsi was
feeling the inadequacy of the present
day clog (whatever that might be)
and wanted something different. He
or she wanted to strike out along un-
trodden paths, wanted to do bigger,
better things. A sort of H1mmelslimn-
sucht as our German prof would put
it,
end the beautiful part about all this
,was that the person was willing to let
others in on his striving for the Ideal.
Unselfish, we call it.
The other notice that started us on
a train of thought was addressed to
freshmen and was to the effect that
Aurora wanted their name, home ad-
dress and telephone number. This was
interesting.
Who was this Aurora? What did she
want with the information she asked
for? Did it apply to freshmen alone
-or also to freshwomen? And if so
what was it all about? Was she throw-
ing a party, or starting a matrimonial
agency; or was she just the Ypsilant'
representative of a credit bureau who
wanted to get a line on the Normal
students' financial ratings?f
All these questions were unsolve
when we left Ypsi and they are still
unsolved. Anybody who can give us
any information about this mysterious
Aurora, and also about the original
clogs will please write us care of this
office.
* 4 *
Something that has a rairly definite
bearing on ROLLS, which, after all,
is technically a humor column, is the
fact that last night we went to see
"Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" which is
about as funny a play as has been
written since "The Show-Off." We
remark on the fact because it is the
duty of such a column as ROLLS to
keep its readers, if any, posted on

notable achievements in other fields
of humor. We can recommend "Gen-
tlemen Prefer Blondes," both the
novel and the play, whole-heartedly.
* * *
Stampede, who is connected in some
shady way with this paper and who
has contributed frequently to ROLLS
under his own and other names, put
us on to a rather good thing. It seems
that Michael, well known to all read-
ers of the column, has not been con-
fining his poetic attempts to the edi-F
torial page. Some of his verse has
been cluttering up the sports assign-
ment sheet. Here is one specimen,
which, we understand, should be sung
to the tune of the "Sailor's Sweet-
heart." The "he" referred to is one
of the office Beau Brummels:
He was just a two-time sweeheart,
and he loved both ladies well; but
they up and caught him napping, and
the rest, why I won't tell you just
what happened, still he loves both
bloomin' girlies, and he's loyal to the

"GENTLEXEN PREFER BLONDES"
A review, by William Rich Breyer.
Anita Loos' farcical story of gold-
diggers' methods of levying toll on
unwary gentlemen has been translat-
ed into an enormously amusing play.
It is one of the few capable dramatiza-
tions of novels that have been pro-
duced in the last few years. Practi-
cally all of the narrative of the origi-
nal "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" has
been retained in the play; and many
of the cleverer wisecracks have also
been included.
Of course, the funniest thing
in the book, the lines a b o u t
doseph Conrad being "a man who
wrote books on ocean travel" was
omitted, but other brilliant ones
have been substituted. The scene in
the play where the chorus-girl's
clothes are stolen and she has to ap-
pear at Lorelei's "debut" party in a
bathing suit and pink cape was not
in the original story; nor did Lorelei.
in the novel, give her gentleman
friend ptomaine poisoning to get him
out of the way for her more important
love affair.
The casting of the play was most
fortunate,-every player was abso-
lutely perfect for the part he or she
portrayed. The best performance was
given by Edna Hibbard as the slangy,
"unrefined" Dorothy Shaw, the
Blonde's friend and chaperon. G. P.
Huntley, as the British peer whose
counterpart is never found outside the
pages of a novel by P. G. Wodehouse,
was flawless. Mrs. Jacques Martin,
playing the part of the bibulous Mrs.
Spoffard, played the tipsy lady almost
as well as Edna May Oliver would
have done.
Frank Morgan, as the millionaire,
was an excellent victim of seasick-
ness. One might almost have sup-
posed that he really was suffering
from the ailment. Mildred MacLeod,
who created the leading role of Lor-
elei Lee, was charming. Her versa-
tility is plainly seen when one re-
calls that her last performance was
in the part of the bedraggled little
waif in "Wild Birds."
Altogether the play shows a pene-
trating insight into the character of
a metropolitan gold-dgger, a Dulcy
of the demi-monde.
"S. S. GLENCAIRN"
As the last dramatic offering of
Mimes for the season, Eugene O'Neill's
trilogy of one act plays combined un-
der the title of the "S. S. Glencairn"
will be given this week in the Mimes
theater. This is the first time this
series of plays has even been pre-
sented, except by the Provincetown
Players in New York-a quite signifi-
cant fact in itself, since this is the sec-I
ond time in the season that Mimes hasI
pioneered in the field of campus
dramatics.
MORE "RAIN"I
It w.as four years ago that Jeanne
Eagels opened in "Rain" at the Gar-
rick theater in Philadelphia, and
since that time the show has not left
the boards. And incidentally Sadie
Thompson has become a household
name to the trade.
At her last appearance in Detroit
Miss Eagels was unable, because of
illness to play'the part except for the
last performances, and her return to
the New Detroit will give that city one
more chance to be politely ,and con-
ventionally shocked, and in addition
will give every Woman's Club in the
state material for a paper on the filth
in the modern drama.
But there is something eternal--
truth if you will-to "Rain" that
makes it more than the story of Sadie
Thompson from the red light district

I of San Francisco and Honolulu and a
fanatical missionary during a tropical
rainstorm. It is a cross section of
life, sordid as it may be and as such is
deserving of the record run that has f
put it in the class of "Lightenin'" and
even Ann Nichol's prodigous "Abbie"
show.
THE MATINEE MUSICALE
"The Lady of Shalott," a contata
for women's voices by -Charles Ben-
nett, and adapted from the poem by
Tennyson will be given Wednesday
afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the Mich-
igan Union. The soloists are as fol-
lows:
Barre Hill ................Baritone
Grace Johnson Konold ...... Soprano
Ora C. Lothard ...............Cellist I
Lucille Brogan .............. Harpist
Pauline Kaiser.............Violinist
Director...........Mrs. Harry Bacher
In a story of the shooting of Mus-
solini: "The bullet aimed at the pre-

.1

HALLER'S
STATE STREET JEWELERS
Visit Our Optical Department

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Ready To Begin School?
Have your clothes laundered
up for you now that the strenuous vaca-
tion is over.
Clothes returned in perfect condition.
The MOE LAUNDRY
204 N. MAIN ST. DIAL 3

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Consult us on Fine Engraving. It
is time now to order your calling
Cards for Commencement,

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TICE'S
709 North University
Near Arcade Theatre

NATILM-MMES&Bf

GRAHA * M'S BOOK STORES
AT BOTH ENDS OF THE DIACONAL

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ANW ARBOR
MICH.

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May 7th and Sth

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