100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1926 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAt' O-UR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUE-DAY, APRIL 6, 1926

Published every morning except Monday
duringthe Universit year by the Board in
CQxtol,_of. Student Publications.
M eiubers of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not ,otherwise
Credited in.this paper and the local news pub-,
fished ;herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
*f postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
14.00.
Offices: An* Arbor Press Building, May.
Rat'd:Street.
Pkqmess :v EdltorWs2 4323; tbsisals, s124.

r+1
r:,
f 1'

xprjTOXIAL TAFlX
Xeloephone 04M

MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairnan, Editorial Board.....Norman R. Thal
City Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor..........Manning Housewortb
Women's- Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor................Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor...........William Walthour
Music and, Drama.........Robert B. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Robert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
Gertrude Bailey Harriett Levy
Charles Behymer Ellis Merry
George B~erneike Dorothy Morehouse
William Brcyer Margaret Parker
Philip C. Brooks stanford N. Phelps
Farnum. Buckingham Archie Robinson
Stratton- Buck Simon Rosenbaum
Carl BurgerrWilton Simpson
Edgar Carter Janet Sinclair
oseph Chamberlain Courtland Smith
eyer Cohen Stanley Steinko
Carleton Champe Louis Tendler
Dougias Doubleday Henry Thurnau
Eugene H. GVtekunst David C. Vokes
Andrew Goodmans Marion Wells
JamesT 7THerald Cassam A. Wilson
Russell Klitt Thomas C. Winter
Miles Kimball Marguerite Zilske
tdarion Kubik
BUSlINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

that he is a college graduate, he con-
siders himself a product of "the
school of hard knocks," as he puts it
with the minimum of originality.
There is much to say on his side, and
in view of the growing agitation for
a more elaborated and broader series
of courses in the drama, it seems
worth saying.
Obviously, the matter of instruction
is a difficut one, for if a man writes
successful pieces, he devotes himself,
not to teaching others his tricks, but
to writing more plays. This is trueI
in other fields of the theater also,
eminent actors and directors practice
their art commercially, not academi-
cally.
Aside from this, there is, as Kear-
ney expressed, a grave doubt in the
minds of many as to the value of such
courses. Certainly the local, unpre-
suming organization in University
Hall cannot hope to produce great
writers or actors. The problem is
whether a complete school of the
theater would be any more successful.
Despite Mr. Kearney, Baker at Yale,
and now Harvard, has produced sev-
eral successful graduates, among
them, O'Neill and the American Bar-
rie, not to mention a score of eminent
one-act play-makers. One can easily
imagine Mr. Kearney's answer: they
would have been better playwrights
had they never seen Baker.
And yet Yale has seen fit to. estab-
lish an elaborate organization under
Baker. Apparently this University
found grounds upon which to set
great faith in this field of education.
There is the demand at Michigan, but
not the faith, hence not the funds. A
school of the theater for Michigan
would not be a guaranteed invest-I
ment, perhaps, but a sane and worth-I
while experiment.
Those girls that have been buying
clothes for Easter Sunday for the last
month must now realize how it seems
to feel like ten cents waiting for
1 change.

,s

I,

BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

Advertising........ ..Joseph J: Finnj
Advertising..............Rudolph Rostel a'
Advertising...............Wm. L. Mullin
Advertising..........Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
Circulation............ ...James R. DePuy
Publication.............Frank R. Dent, Jr.
Accounts..................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

{
i
1j
i
1
i
{

George H. Annable, Jr.
W. Carl Bauer
John 1I. lBobrink
Ianley S. Coddington
W. J. Cox
Marion A. Daniel
-AfaryFlinterman
tan Gilbert
1e T. Kenneth Haves
I arold Holmes
Oscar A. Jose

Frank Mosher
F. A. Norquist
ILoleta G. Parker
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wm. C. Pusch
Nance Solomon
Thomas Sunderland
Win. J. Weinmnan
NI argaret Smith
Sidney Wilson

r,
r.
t::

TUESDAY, APRIL 6, 1926
Night Editor--W. C. PATTERSONf
"Judge English will fight all
the way through and there is not
a chance that he will resign. I
have confidence that in the Senate
he will receive a fair and im-
partial trial at he hands of men
of high character and ability,
whose only consideration will be
the law and the evidence."-
Bruce Campbell, Judge English's
counsel.
THE GRIDIRON KNIGHTS
There is one ,night each year when
official dignity and solemn proprietyl
are laid aside, and prominent men in
the affairs of the state and of the
TUniversity roast together on the grid-*
iron of satire-when their achieve-
nents of the past twelve months are
open to the merciless criticism of,
their friends, and heated discussions I
between ordinarily calm men are car-1
ried on amid a general air of hilarity.-
The Gridiron Knights-will hold their
annual banquet and razz-fest at the
Union tonight.
However, the program this year in-
dicates that beneath the banter of
various speakers arguing on such,
topics as ",The Abolition of the Pro-I
fessor," and the witticisms of the ac-,
c(ompaning "radio" program, there
will be a bit of serious discussion of,
the problems of the day by men
whose opinions are valuable,. Many
of the quips will be definitely aimed
at conditions in the state and Uni-1
versity which are in need of reform.-
And absolute frankness will be pos-,
sible, as the affair will not be broad-;
cast, despite requests, and newspa-.
Ps men present will be bound by an
cath c secrecy. .The sparks that fly
1 rom the gridiron.N will not be allowed,
to spread.-
The Gridiron Banquet, now in its;
fourth year, is t. specta 1e worth wit-;
re g and ,0) institution worth
leeing. Mlay those men who will be;
placed on its fi'e tonight be well-,
roasted-and enjoy the process.
f'tC1OOL OF TIE THEATER
" clhools of (lramattic writing stifle
the voice of geniis and straightjacketj
art," in the opinion of Patrick.
1. OA I'lli.trn y a rn1aima nl,_

Someday we'll be able to tell our
children about how, way back in '26,
Easter looked more like ChristmasE
than Christmas itself.-
The question of the day is whether
Santa Claus or the Easter Rabbit will1
Santa Claus or the Easter Rabbit vis-
ited us Sunday.-
Everything was closed yesterday
afternoon but classes, which were
open as usual.-
Ambitious congressman might sub-l
stitute snow shovels for free seeds
this year.l
Playing in an interscholastic tour-!
nament is one way of "going through
college."
EDITORIAL COMMENT I
HONORI
(The Ohio State Lantern) t
The fight is on again!
As long as universities continue tot
maintain and give credence to the
education myth, the honor system will
probably be an outstanding issue.,
"The student body i.s too big physi-
cally and too small mentally to ac-]
cept the honor system," says Chair-
man Rogers of the faculty-studentl
committee on the honor system at thet
University of Texas. The unwilling-
ness of the students to accept theirl
share of responsibility, as well as
failure on the part of the faculty tol
cooperate, are, according to the pessi-
mistic Mr. Rogers, two good reasonst
whythe honor system can never suc-
ceed.
The question in our mind, however,
is of an entirely different nature.t
Just why is it called the "honor"
system? From all indications it'
would seem that it is everything elsel
except. It is certainly not what its
name implies-a system depending on
the honor of the student. Instead it
has resolved itself into a question of
who shall report cheating in classes-t
the students, who are not paid for it,
or the faculty, who are. And this be-
ing granted, where does the honor
come in? Is it more honorable tot
be, spied upon by those upon whom
you spy in turn, thus making the sys-
tem merely a game of -hide-and-seek
on a large scale, than to be subject
to the enforced supervision of some'
member of the faculty? We think not,
ant in addition to that it is conider-
ably more trouble.
Then there is another side to this
apparently burning question. It con-
cerns the Court of Honor which is soa
much a part of the system. The
name itself is an anomaly. Can honor
be consistent with law enforcement?
In the great organization known as
Society it is the weaker members who
need the moral stimulus of force.
T ras h, hw ln t taw l, fr,,,,mnnt

TATEDRLL
THIS IS THE
THIRD WEEK OF
SPRING, HA, HA
Somehow it seemed to slip every-
one's attention, but during most of
last week the Maj displayed a large
sign in electric lights, reading "Al's
Here." Rather clever advertising
stunt, even though it was a different
"Al"
Speaking about movies, we wish to
call the attention of the humor loving
public to the advertisements which
appear daily in this journal announc-
ing the current films at the Rae The-
atre. Among the most brilliant of
their advertising strokes is the fol-
lowing:
THREE PIECE ORCHESTRA.
(Piano, Stool, and player)
* * *
RESEARCH WORKERS FIND
HISTORY OF STUDENT UJNION
BULLETIN
Ann Arbor, U. S. A. The Earth,
(Special to Rolls)-Snow today de-
layed the work of the expedition. The
campus sidewalks are now appearing
as they are so widely famed for in
ancient literature, and the explorers
are reverently treading the deep
drifts where students of long ago
stumbled.
* * *
Ann Arbor, U. S. A., The Earth;
(Special to Rolls)-A mysterious
union of students that evidently ex-
isted for many years in the University
of Michigan was the subject of a re-
cent investigation by our historian,
Prof. 1898 series B, with Rolls' Own
Expedition to the Earth.
It is believed that the union was
officially recognized by the university
authorities, but the location of the
building, in an out-of-the-way spot,
is believed to show that when first
built the Union was a secret organiza-
tion hiding from the authorities.
Subsequent news of the union, as
found in issues of the Daily discover-
ed recently on the campus,esupport
this contention of our research.
Throughout its long history, many in-
vestigations have been made, as in
the case of other secret fraternal or-
ganizations such as the historically
famous K. K. K. and the Orangemen.
But these investigations seem to
have disclosed nothing, and apparent-
ly the authorities never succeeded in
abolishing the organization. What the
headquarters was used for, besides
being the meeting place of the vari-
ous committees investigating it, is not
known as yet by historians. They
hope to find evidence that it was used
as a meeting place of the students,
but as yet the only meetings they
have found recorded have been con-
ventions of other unions of the state
and country.
One theory of the purpose of the
building, which now is reduced to a
pile of bricks and scattered manu-
scripts containing reports and coun-
ter-reports, is that it was the head-
quarters of national or state labor
unions. Supporting this is the collec-
tion of documents now at hand cover-
ing the activities of a national troupe
of musical comedy artists, which had
its main offices here for many years.
In addition there are references to a
stock company of dramatists which
had headquarters in the students
union.
Although evidence pointing to this
building as the headquarters of
alumni has been found, this is refuted
by the fact that the alumni themselves
built a much more magnificent struc-
ture on the campus itself.
The financial arrangements of the

organization seemed to have caused
some trouble from time to time, but
the difficulty was finally solved by
renting the building to the Athletic
Association for use of the College of
Football, Basketball and Allied Arts.
--Timothy Hay.
NOTICE
Our representative will be in town
to interview any aspirants for a po-
sition with a growing national con-
cern. Only men with ambition and
aggressiveness will be considered, as
the work is of an extremely difficult
nature. If you have the above quali-
fications, kindly interview our agent
in room 345209 of the Michigan union.
The main work of the position we
are considering college men for is
punching eyes in tin soldiers.
AMERICAN TIN SOLDIER COMPANY
ANOTHER NOTICE .
Any college man-desirous of obtain-
ing a.good position will kindly stand
in front of the Farmer and Mechan-
ics Bank; there's money in it.
NICK.
* * *
WE FOUND THIS ON OUR DESK
Here's a little song (positively the
latest) special to ROLLS!!! "He was

Professor Hollister is presenting
John Galsworthy's "The Skin Game"
Wednesday evening at eight o'clock
in University hall as the second num-
ber of the Play Production course.
The performance will be given only
tomorrow night due to the engage-
ment of Robert Mantell on Thursday
evening in the Whitney tehatre.
The cast has been selected as fol-
lows:
Hillcrist ............K. enneth King
Amy ...........Margaret Haenckel
Jill ................. Carol Cleaver
Dawker ........... Richard Woellhaf
Hornblower ........... Herbert Moss
Charles .............Edward Reece
Chloe .........Mary Lois Gudakunst
Rolf ..............Joseph Burkhard
Fellows ........John Van Coevering
Anna...............Elsie Ralston
The Jackmans.......Jessie Werner i
Herbert Heusman
An auctioneer ........... Daniel Huff
A solicitor ........Edward Newhall
Two strangers .......Robert Wetzel
Edward Newhall
The Music and Drama column takes
the liberty of recommending "The
Skin Game" as one of Galsworthy's
powerful thesis tragedies. Die Kunst
und der Rote Tail!
* * *
THE ORGAN RECITAL
Palmer Christian, University or-
ganist, will offer the following Organ
Recital tomorrow afternoon in Hill
auditorium at four-fifteen o'clock:
Piece Heroique ............. Frack
Spring Song .................Hollins
Prelude a "L'apres midi d'un
faune"............. ....ebussy
(transcription by Mr. Christian)
Christus Ressurexit.......Ravenello
Andante expressivo (Sonata in
G) ........................ E lgar
Scherzo .................. Dickinson
Evening Bells and Cradle Song..
.MacFarlane
Marche Militaire No. 1 .... Schubert
The next recital will be on Wednes-
day, April 21.
THE FACULTY CONCERT
A review, by Charles Dearing.
Even the most fastidious musical
tastes might easily have been satis-
fied by the concluding concert of the
Faculty series presented Sunday af-
ternoon by the University Symphony
orchestra, Samuel Lockwood con-
ducting, assisted by And'rew Haigh,
pianist, and Emily Mutter, violinist.
The program was arranged with
flagrant disregard for modern sym-
phony psychology. Since the state
of satiety has been reached with most
concert audiences before the final
number is played, it takes a brave
conductor to open his program with
such bandinage as the Tava-Marchetti
Spanish dances-follow that with a
Mendelssohn concerto and overture,
and close with Rachmaninoff.
Under difficulty at times, from a too
insistent orchestra accompaniment,
Miss Mutter played the first move-
ment of Mendelssohn's Concerto, Op.
64, in a manner which displayed a
mastery of violin technique, and an
absence of the sang-froid of "harden-
ed" professionals.
Mendelssohn's Overture, "Fingal's
Cave," revealed an orchestra whose
intelligent interpretation and blend-
ing of tone would be hard to surpass
in any organization of its kind. There
were few "uncertain spots" here and
there.
Rachmaninoff's Concerto No. 2 in C
minor is a tremendous but gloomy
piece, exacting for both players and
listener. The theme of melancholy,
effected by slow melodies in the first

two movements, is relieved by an oc-
casional note of lightness and grace,
and by a brilliant climax in the third
movement. Andrew Haigh showed
himself to be an artist of versatility
and understanding in his interpreta-
tion of the concerto-a piece requir-
ing everything from delicate skill in
runs to the most dynamic execution.
Incidentally he is a pianist who has'
not allowed the ear-marks of his pro-
fession to fasten themselves too
strongly upon him, one who can be
pleasing as well as dextrous.
Although the numbers were diffi-
cult, it is hard to imagine a univer-
sity orchestra presenting such a pro-
gram in a more gratifying manner: a
IToS ,m rS nf nr n+n i n nn

Fifteen cents for first dcay, five cents every day following.
Deposit of $1.50 required, refunded on return of book.

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA
TONIGHT: Le Cercle Francais pre-
sents "Les Deux Sourds" by Moineamx
and "Maitre Pathelin" In the Mimes
theatre at 8:15 o'clock.
* * *

ig" , g .L 17 .u_ Ypqt

Be sure to take a book hor to that littlo &ister or brother
At both ends of the D:-goni Walk

I

I

STATE STRIVET JEWELERS
Visit Our Optical Department

SKILLED REPAIRING
ALL MAKES

DON'T
MAK
PAT H S
ON T HE

ATLLQfIHE

r
'--i
a
a.
a
{C.
r--1
0.
TUt

NVARB:R
SAC', }
lot
fi'

This pen has
writing quality--

unequalled

m..

Gn=M!

"IF IT'S
ATRE, IT'S

The largest ink capacity of
any Fountain Pen (230 drops).
is positively the strongest
and most durable - and is

Co sa
9
>'J
}J} MAAN
coma=

a,

IN THE
SURE TO

backed by

skilled service

right here-in Ann Arbor.
The Michigan Pen.

MIMES THE-
BE GOOD!"

66 7/N
BUIL FC~' B.)~NEH

1

i
Pell

Rent0,11ol. t e ok t h Lni Library,

{{{{
k(

The Four Pie sport
sack is an accepted
part of every rran's
wardrobe ... and as
tailored by us it has
the established ap-
proval of weledrns.ed
men.

f
ti3

NexY SlhoxvIng
31,v 7th and 8th
Frid:: .ind Saturday
Place of is'play to be
Announced Later.
Nat LUXENBERG & Bro.
37 Union Square, New York
21 Between 16th & 17th Sts.

2an Shop

315 State St.
Ann Arbor, Mich.
REAL SERVICE

P* ,~

PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW. I EM MY

* Itn y.7tFriday, prilil

MAIL ORDERS FILLED IN ORDER RECEIVED. SEATS NOW SELLING

-I

t

1

I

I M-1 .- -M II -- - - - .LWmC2 Mias L -A4. . LL-f'- - I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan