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March 28, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-28

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PACE FOUR'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 28. 11922)

1 tr- t91T111-1 \ M DAI TN YMAC- 2 19i

A.)lllf-iflll 1t1.L7.14 V1A IWO, .Lt71+U

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Published every morning except Monday
during 'the University year by the hoard in
Control of Student Publications.
^Memberof Western Conference Editorial
Association.
rhe Associated Preissis exclusively en-
titled to the usefor republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited i this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice. at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post.
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
mrd Street.
Phones ; Editoril.4 Na 3;ibnaslsss, Ki4s ..

j* 7y

11DITORIAL STAF11

MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board.... Norman R. Thai
City Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor............Manning Housewortb
Women's Editor..........Helen S. Ramsay
Sport's Editor........ Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor.........William Walthour
Music and Drama......Robert B. Hendersou
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hal
Robert T. DeVore Thomas V. Koykka
W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Y Twin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
rrveBalv Hrit Lev

ha rles Behymer
W illiam Bryer
l'hillip Brooks
Farnum Buckingham
Streton Buck
Carl Burger
dgar Carter
garph Chamberlain,
Meyer Cohen
>arlcton Champe
Dumglas Doubleday
lugene H. Gutekunst
Andrew Goodman
James T. Herald
Russell Hitt
Miles Kimball
1'!arion Kubik

Ellis Merry
D orothy Morehouse
Margaret Parker
stanford N. Phelps
Simon Rosenbaum
Wilton Simpson
Janet Sinclair
Courtland Smith
Stanley Steinko
Louis Tendler
Henry Thurnau
David C. Vokes
Marion Wells
Cassam A. Wilson
Thomas C. Winter
Marguerite Zilske

ruptcy, to have improper privileges
at the bar; having funds controlled
by the court deposited in banks in
which he and the referee were stock-
holders; and with having committed "HAIL
other "improperties and irregulari- dBETA
ties" which constitute high crimes and A!A
misdemeanors. FROM THE B. AND G. NEWS
We guard our federal judiciary
jealously, but we pay them such a Luas lilds"
pittance that they are often forced to A 1Review, by E. G. Forgiven.
look elsewhere for additional income. Yes sir, by jove, they sure giv
There may be no such explanation for swell plays there in "U" hall thes
the alleged actions of Judge English, days. Of course I don't know so con
but, unless a man is innately criminal,
he does not desert a position of the founded much about all this ne
highest respectability in the commu- fangled technique of the theatre bus:
nity, carrying with it, supposedly, ness, but I do know a good old fash
sufficient renumeration, to delve into ioned show when I see one. And th
shadier paths. last one "Luna's Kids" sure wase
United States judges are good judges.
It is not possible to keep them so at knock out. Before I went I heard
shopkeepers' wages. lot about this being one of them st
,.___ Idies of insanity-one of those play
that shows you a lot of cracked pe
The current edition of the Junior pe on the stage just raving aroun
Tand acting as if they were sure craz
Girls' play, which has just completed enough. But that's what I liked abo
a successful run at the Whitney, this here show.. None of that ne
brings to the front once more the old fangled nonsense. That's what I lik
question of the localization of the about all the plays they does. N
Union opera. The junior girls have matter what confounded ideas th
produced a play, with Ann Arbor for bloke that wrote the play has the
the setting, which is dependant on always puts them on senseable lik
local references for many of its All the people in the plays is ju
laughs, and, to judge from the re- folks like you and I can understan
ports of the critics and the sales at They don't have no elaborate sceer
the box office, their work is being ap- or anything, just green curtains. B
proved. Why not the Union opera? the actors do the rest.
The reason is not very obscure. A NoW in this show for instance, the
local opera might be a great success keep you interested every momen
at the Whitney but it would face a They never just sits still and talk
very different test when performed on And it makes the show blame
the stage of the Metropolitan Opera worthwhile seeing. Another thing
house in New York-and there, after that they never just says words th
all, is the place where the opera must way you'd expect people do if th
"go." It is a g'eat advertising me- was just talking natural like, th
dium for the University, and an un- says them the way they should b
successful show on the road would said on the stage, real dramatic lik
not be forgiven because it was liked That's what I can't see in these he
in Ann Arbor. shows over to the Mimes. Theyt
And the time--honored jokes about is alright I suppose only you see th
Professors Cross, Van Tyne, Wenley people on the stage doing things a
and others somehow lose their flavor saying things just like they do off ti
when taken from their home stting. the stage. And that ain't theatr
Many of the road audiences are unac- why if I just want to hear peop
quainted with these names-alumni talk natural, I go down to the po
forget rapidly, and the host of friends parlor and talk with the boys.
that have never been to Ann Arbor And the way them young fellow
fail to see the joke. dollege life has does old men parts is mighty fin
changed with the passing dcades They has the crook in the knees an
and humorous touches'of the present everything so's you could hardly te
fail to reach the audiences that are they wasn't four score years and ma
not familiar with the Ann Arbor of be eight or nine. I don't know mu
today. about the teachers in this place e
The junior girls have done their cept what they writes on the boar
work well, and their production is in the class rooms, and most of th
filling its place in the life of the cam- looks pretty crazy before I wash
pus with a full measure of success. off, but the fellow that puts the
But the critics who point to their c- shows on, he's all right, he is. H
complishment as a guide for future don't put it on the way them ne
operas are forgetting the vast cif fangled citified guys does. He pu
ference between the shows. One is them on like they was just folks, a
for local consumption, and the other us folks likes them and goes, to s
is primarily intended for the -road- them too. And I ain't the only o
with the Ann Arbor run as a period of feels that way about it. Why, t
final rehearsal. The opera should be other night when I was there I se
general in its appeal, and to attain more of my friends all real folk
this end with a "local" show is well- mind you, in the audience than ever
nigh impossible. seen over to Mimes or any oth
place. Them places is filled wi
these teachers and city fellows, that
An item in the Philadelphia Public all.
Ledger says, "Congressional news is * * *
uninteresting today-Congress seems CHICAGO BANDITS RAID
determined to fritter its time away." ANN ARBOR EXPEDITIO
It refers to March 25, 1835. ANrA-BO.TeXPEDTl
Ann Arhnr UT S A The~ Ear~t

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THIS AFTERNOON: The Faculty
Concert in Hill auditorium at 4:15
o'clock.
* * *
NEWS
In additiop to the three perform-{
ances in the Mimes theatre Thursday,1
Friday, and Saturday of this week,
the Committee on Student Affairs has
granted special permission for a tour
of Bernard Shaw's "Great Catherine"
throughout Ohio and Michigan dur-
ing the spring vacation. The com-
pany will include the same cast
which is presenting the farce here.
while Miss Gem Sherman, chaperone
of the Alpha Phi sorority house, will
also be a member of the troupe, and
William MacPherson, carpenter for
the Mimes theatre, will act as stage
manager.
The tour will open Thursday even-S
ing, April 8, in the Scott High School
auditorium, Toledo, and will close
Monday, April 19, with a matinee and
evening performance in the Central
High School, Grand Rapids. Other
towns in the itinerary include Bay
City, Detroit, Flint, Ypsilanti, Wayne,
and either Owosso or Kalamazoo.
The entire trip is under the au-
spices of the Alumnae Council and
has been organized through the local
alumnae groups for the benefit of the
Women's League building. The per-
formances are being presented in
high school auditoriums rather than
commercial theatres to avoid any
professional competition, and the pro-
duction with the consent of Dean
Bursley and Prof. O. J. Campbell does
not officially represent the Ujiiversity.
tc >.; ::":::";:::>::::::::::?;a:;F;4::8.Q , b'Sk:"4' +g5'??.s 4k $.'.::.2,f

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA

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A __

SKILLED REPAIRING
ALL MAKES

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If your pen works badly, consult a pen specialist at
315 State St.
Our hospital is fully equipped and our skilled operators
never lose a case. Consultations free.
Rader 's Pen Shop

I; i i

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II -i

wLITTLE BLUE BOOK LIBRARY
MORE ThAN 300 TiTLES
Drama, Shakespeare's Plays, Fiction, History, Biography, Humor, Literature, Maxins,
Epigrams, Philosophy, Religion, Poetry, Debates, Science and Miscellaneous.
.c Per Volume
Craham Book Stores
At Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk

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REAL SERVICE

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Make your party dis-
tinctive by using our
place cards, nut cups
and tallies.
APPLIED ARTS
2 Nickels Arcade
The Shop for Unique Gifts

..-

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

Phone 4741 1111 South University. Phone 471-
GET YOUR BLUE BOOKS
FOR THE "MIDS"
I1%

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Advertising...............Joseph J. Finn
Advertising.............Rudolph Bliotelman
Advertising.............. .... Wm. L. Mullin
A- -rtising - --...Thomas D. Olmsted, Jr.
( irculation.................James R. DePuy
111'i'hication ..............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Accounts. ................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants

George H. Annable, Jr.1
W. Carl Bauer
John H. Bobrink
,taalcy S. Coddington
Marion A. Daniel
Mary Flinterman
Stan Gilbert
T. Kenneth Haven
harold Holmes
Oscar A. Jose

Frank Mosher
F. A. N orquist
Loleta G. Parker
David Perrot
Robert Prentiss
Wm. C. Pusch
Novice Solomon
Thoma!, Sunderland
Wm. J. Weinman
Margaret Smith
Sidney Wilson

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE

SUNDAY, MARCH 28, 1926

GR ANGER'S

Night Editor-SMITH H. CADY, JR.
IMPEACHMENT
When, and if, the House passes the
articles of impeachment of Judge
George W. English, of the eastern
United States district court of Illinois,
it will be only the tenth time in our
national history of a century and a
half that such action will have been
taken by the House, and the seventh
instance in which a federal judge was
Involved.
The history of the impeachment ac-
tions taken by the House and subse-
quently tried before the Senate indi-
cate an extremely rational attitude
on the part of our national assembly
in handling such matters. The nine
cases of the past are:
(1) 1799 - Senator William
Blount, of Tennessee. Case dis-
}'sect for want of jurisdiction
after he had resigned.
(2) 1804-District Judge John
Pickering, of New Hampshire.
iRemoved from office.
(3) 1805-Samuel Chase, asso-
ciate justice of the Supreme
Court. Acquitted.
(4) 1831-District Judge James
H. Peck, of Missouri. Acquitted.
(5) 1862-District Judge West
I.. Humphreys, of Tennessee. Re-
moved from office.
(6) 1868 - President Andrew
Johnson. Acquitted (by one
vote).
(7) 1876-Secretary of War
William W. Belknap. Acquitted.
(8)., 1905 .-, District J u d g e
Charles Swayne, of Florida. Ac-
quitted.,
(9), 1913-Robert W. Archi-
bald,' associate justice of the
United States Commerce court.
Removed' from office.
This list, including, in addition to
six federal judges, one President, one
cabinet member, and one member of
the Senate, seems, by its very compo-
sition, to emphasize the word "cau-
tion," with which Congress seems to
have been familiar at least during the
time of this highest of coilrt proceed-
ings. And this list seems, among
other things, to contain the exceptions
that prove the rule that United States
judges are good judges.
Beyond the 15 to 6 recommendation
for impeachment of the House Judici-
ary committee, no further action on

'.
11
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EDITORIAL COMMENT

f

BRIGHT COLLEGE YEARS
(The New York World)
That University of Nebraska grad-
uate who says that college wasted'
four years of his life throws a bright.
white light on why our colleges have
sunk to their present unimpressive
level. What is the nub of his coin-
plaint? That college, instead of add-
ing to his earning capacity, loaded him
up with a lot of useless history and
philosophy and left him unable to
make a living wage. That part of#
his education which could properly be
called knowledge he resents; only
that part which means dollars and
cents strikes him as valuable.
His remedy is simple: He would re-
form the university by installing
therein a "$15,000-a-year man, who
has trained men and who knows men,"
to take charge of a vocational guid-
ance department, so that all candi-
dates for the bachelor of arts degree
would be assured of jobs the day after
commencement. The University of
Nebraska, if he had charge of it,
would become a cross between a trade I
school and an employment agency,
combining the worst features of both.
Is he an unusual case? Not at all.
You can hear the same kind of talk
in any fraternity house in the coun-
try. Yet our liberal editors wonder
why our colleges tend to be more and
more utilitarian; why courses. in di-
rect-mail advertising crowd out
courses in modern French literature;j
why culture, as it used to be under-
stood, is fast disappearing from the
campus. Our young friend from Ne-

,LA11 lN l . 0. M. 11 t,
(Special to Rolls)-A roving band of
bandits raided the camp of Rolls' Own
Expedition here today. Many bombs
were dropped from the four airplanes
in the robbers' fleet, but no damage
was done. As the planes disappeared
in the distance, the Ann Arbor police
force arrived on the scene.
They said that the bandits were
members of a roving tribe, with head-
quarters on the site of- Chicago, an
ancient city near by. Further ques-
tioning brought the information that
the only swamp in this part of the
Earth is located near Chicago, on the
ground where once stood the football
stadium of the Northwestern Uni-
versity.
The chief of police was curious to
know the purpose of the expedition.
When told that we were searching
for the ruins of the ancient University
of Michigan, he replied, "Why, has it
disappeared? I thought it was still
in operation."
The police were also surprised that
their police headquarters had been
buried under the sand. "Why," they
exclaimed. "It kind of looks like we
are out of a job." When asked the
reason for their lack of knowledge of
what was going on around them, they
answered that they were concentrat-
ing all efforts to finding the bandit
that held up the ancient "Maj."
Only one important discovery was
made today by the expedition: the
Alumni Memorial building was found.
In it are many spacious offices and
curious pieces of statuary and paint-
ings. It is believed to be the admin-!
istration building of the University,!
since no other building so far dis-
covered has offices that can compare
with these.
A record of the minutes of the

Amy Loomis
Catherine in "Great Catherine"
The present revival is being staged
by Paul Stephenson, director of the
Ypsilanti Players, and the cast has
been materially revised. Lillian
Bronson, who did such exceptional
work as Helen in "Why Marry?", is
playing Claire, while Phyllis Lough-
ton is replacing Elizabeth Strauss as
Varinka . Neal Nyland is cast as Cap-
tain Edstaston, and Warren Parker,
- who appeared as Angus MacAllister
in "Engaged," has the role of the
Sergeant. Amy Loomis and Robert
Henderson are playing their original
characters of Catherine and Prince;
Patiomkin.
The farce itself has grown ineasur-
ably under Mr. Stephenson's direction.
The parts have matured and every
rehearsal brings new possibilities
from the lines. Catherine has deeper
bursts of her passion, she is more thej
fishfag and Juno that; Shaw has pre-!
scribed . Patiomkin is more brawling
and gusty, and Varinka is being play-
ed for the sensual, earthly creature
she actually was.
It is, in fact, a new "Great Cath-
erine," lusty and more broadly bur-
lesqued. Pure theatre as none other
of Shaw's comedies, it treats what
must have been the most fascinating
empress in all history-with the high
touch of satire which but one man in
literature can give. Stages provide
no other play capable of standing up
to two such talents .
* * *
THE FACULTY CONCERT
Albert Lockwood and Mrs. Maud
Okkelberg, pianists, and Marion Free-
man, violinist, will offer the following
program for the Faculty Concert this.
afternoon in Hill auditorium at four-
fifteen o'clock:
Sonata Op. 12............Rubinstein
Allegro appassionato; Allegro
scherzando; Allegro risoluto.
(transcribed for two piano by Al-
bert Lockwood)

~s ready to receive applica-
tions for the following
positions:
71 *
amp cri}
AthleticDirector
Nature Study
Expert
Counsellors
If you love the great out-
doors--and boys-here is a
rare opportunity.
Apply at desk.
LANE HALL

the
solution of a
dressing problem
Have you ever wondered what to do
on ?Friday or Saturday nights, when you
don't feel like studying and have seen all
the good shows. Granger's is the logical
solution of this problem.
We also would like to call your atten-
tion to our Wednesday night dance from
8 to 10 for those who enjoy a few hours
3f dancing in the middle of the week.
Dancing
Wednesday, 8-10
Friday, 9-
Saturday, 9-12

x

ranigcr's-

e~c~zcc~

) 5 Or. I 0.04Z I A*

4007

Don't let spring Sundays find
you tied to the kitchen. Come
with the entire family to the
Arcade for dinner and be free'
to enjoy the day as you should

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