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March 19, 1926 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

friTDAY, MARCH! 19, 19)26

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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A. DRESSES LEAGUE
OF WOMEN VOTER!

ist

Pres. Margaret Ellit Accepts
As iPermanent Sponsor Of
The League

Frayer Gives Talk
On Demnocracv At1

TO ELECT DELEGATES

"We look back with gratitude upon
the women of this and other nations
who have blazed new trails for wo-
men's work, and it is our task now,
not to start new ones, but to make
more secure those which are open to
us," said Prof. Margaret Ellit, at the
luncheon of the League of Women
Voters, given in her honor yesterady
noon at the Green Tree inn. ) Prof.
Elliot, who has recently \accepted the
post of permanent sponsor for the or-
ganization, expressed her strongest in-
terest and offered her heartiest coop-
eration in the work that the league
is trying to do throughout the United
States.
Dr. Lillian Smith, director of the
'Bureau of Child Hygiene and Public
a Iealth Nursing of the Michigan de-
partment of health at Lansing gave a
short talk covering thework done by.
the department under the Sheppard-
Towner act since its passing in 1922.
She advocated the use of the govern-
inent -by its people. "National and
state departments are glad to receive
letters of inquiry and will respond to
them," said Dr. Smith.
Announcement was made at the lun-
cheon of a bridge tea to be held next
Wednesday at the Book-Cadillac hotel,
in Detroit. Mrs. Henry Sherrard,
state president of the league, boughtE
three tables for the affair, and has
offered them to college members of
the organization from Michigan State
Normal college at Ypsilanti and the
University of Michigan. Any women
wishing to attend the tea are request-
ed to communicate with Violet Kidder,
'26, who has charge of the disposal,
of the tables.
The next general meeting of the
organization will be Monday, March
29, at which time the constitution
will be definitely decided upon and
the delegates who are to be sent to
the national convention to be held
early in April at St. Louis will be
elected.
Ticket Sale For.
Meet Opens Today
Grace IKratz, '27, who is in charge I
of the ticket sale for the intramural
swimming meet to be held Mar. 31,
will be at Barbour gymnasium from
4 to 5 o'clock today .to sell tickets for
the meet. Athletic managers are re-
quested to have returned their entry
blanks for the meet by next Wednes-
day at the latest. The list of events(
has been revised to include a relay
race, as well as the events previously
announced, and the diving event has
been changed to include one required
and two optional dives instead of two
required and one optional dive. Wo-
men may enter any two events.
PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION NOW.E

Meeting Of D.A.R.
"Our Declaration of Independence is
not great because it is the first expres-
'sion of the democratic theory of gov-
ernment," Prof. William A. Frayer of
the Eufopean History department
stated yesterday in his talk on "The
Foundations of Democracy" before the
meeting of the Daughters of the Amer-
ican Revolution at the home of Mrs.
Horatio J. Abbott, 820 Oxford Road.
"Rather, its 'greatness lies in its ex-
pression of current ideas in immortal
language."
Prof. Frayer traced the influences
throughout the world from 1760 ~o
1776 which led directely to the Decla-
ration of Independence, especially
stressing the ideas contained in the
writings of-the philosophers of the
eighteenth century.
That democracy is being challenged
more at the present time than at any
period since 1776, is another startling
statementmade by Prof. Frayer. "Mil-
lions of .people on the continent of
Europe at this moment believe democ-
racy to be a failure," he said. "It is
for the United States to prove that
the ideas embodied in the Declaration
of Independence can be worked out
successfully.".

Announce Scores NEWI CLOSING RULE TO
Of Class GamesT
With both teams playing a fast game,
the sophomore second squad defeated
Tonight the change in the closing
the freshman second squad 39 to - E rule which was revised March 6 at a
in the interclass basketball games joint meeting of the board of direc-
played yesterday afternoon in Barbour tors of the Women's league and the
gymnasium. The score at the end of !(board of "representatives will take
the first half was 22 to 17 in the favor effect for the first time. The letter
of the sophomores. By the beginning which was sent by the office of the
of the fourth quarter, however, the Women's league to all house presi-
freshmen gained until the points dents and house chaperons explaining
stood 33 to 33 with five minutes to the rule reads as follows:
play. Each team then made another "At the joint meeting of the board
basket. In the last minute, Kathryn i of directors and the board of repre-
Frances, of the sophomore team, scor_ sentatives on March 6, 1926, rule C2a
ed one basket and two foul goals of the house rules for undergraduate
which resulted in its victory. women was changed to read: All en-
As a result of the junior-freshman gagements terminate at 1:30 o'clock
interclass game that was played be- on Friday nights and 12:30 o'clock
tween the second squads Wednesday Saturday nights, regardless of the
night, the Juniors defeated the fresh- type of engagement. This does not
men by a score of 32 to 22.I effect rule Cl of the house rules which

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Last year of a total of 989 calls that
were received by the bureau, 19 weref
from such widely separated countries
as Canada, Hawaii, Turkey, and China.
Perhaps the Michigan students lacks
the adventurous spirit, or perhaps dis-
tance holds no appeal for him. At any
rate none of the above mentioned calls
were filled. One student, however, did
accept a position in a Porto Rican
school.
'Patch Posters" are made by past-
ing or sewing strips of cloth on a
frame to form a picture. The idea
has been patented by Mrs. Cora Sco-I
vil of New York, who claims she has
just signed a contract that will bring
her a fortune.

states that all houses must close and
callers leave at 10:30 o'clock except
Friday and Saturday nights when the
hour is 11:30 o'clock. This change
will not go into effect until the week-
end of March 19 to insure no misun-
derstanding."
The following rule was quoted from
the minutes of the board of directors
of the Women's league for April 27,
1925, and will go into effect for the
first time this semester: "It was
moved and seconded to accept the
rule concerning freshmen proposed by
the board of representatives which
reads, 'If a freshman receives no
grade below a C during the first sem-
ester, she will be allowed one mid-
week date besides Friday, Saturday
and Sunday dates, during the second
semester.

ANNOUNCE NUMBER of
TACHINGPLACEMENTSi
Michigan graduates rank first in the
United States in the number of teach-
ing positions they have secured in
the past year. Of the total number of
calls 55 per cent and of the place-
ments 47 per cent were from this
state. The highest number of place-
ments outside of Michigan was made
in Illinois, 16 students accepting po-
sitions in that state. Of the remain-
ing 37 states from whom calls were
received, Indiana came first with 49
calls, and Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri
followed close in order.
The Stoddard
Hair Shop
We tGive-
Rainwater Shampoos
Violet Ray Scalp Treat
iments
Marcelling
Milk Facial Packs
Expert Hair Tinting
Manicuring
Phone 21212 707 N. University

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SHOES FOR MEN AND WOMEN
W. mAE EATFUL STYLE FOIR WOME
IN VARIOUS COLORS-
WONDIERFUL QUALITY AT REASONABLE PRICES.
$4.98 and $5.90
SILK (IIIFFON hOSE, $1.79, $1.98

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EASTER
MILLINERY

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E ASTER means a New Hat-every fashionable
Miss knows that! Perhaps she. is puzzling
over whether to wear the large-brimmed Hat, a new
favorite, or a tiny model chic in its every inch.

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