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March 03, 1926 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-03-03

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a

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y'

WEDNESDAY, MARCha;-, i1926

9

t ,,

TO BEGIEN HRE
Physicist From Mt Wilson Observa-
tory Ds Secred"For- ectures,During
Summer Session
OTHERSUDIES OFFERED
Charles E . St. John, ,physicist at the
Mount" Wilson solarbservatory, will
offer a spcial courseim relativity and
cosmic physls in the physicsdepart-
ment during the comin summer ses-
ion. lie course will consist of a.11
series of lectures on the various ex-
pierimental tests, of the iistin
theory sand also upon the conribu-
tion of th *mnodrnIea of atomic
structure to the solutin of robles
In cosmic physics.
Other? courses. listed i& the special
announcement of summer courses in
the physics department, which is now
ready for distribution, will be given
by th~e; resident staff of the depart-!
met. 'The courses cover eleentary
physics and phys. of college and
graduate ,grade, togther with re-
search. In addition to the foregoig
xthere are courses of special interest to
teachers.'
Prof.' E. F. Barker will offer in-
struction in moern physics, dealig I
with radioactivity, ,X:-rays, te vacuum
tube, and Qther eectrn andf allied
phenomena wich ead to the theo~y
of. matter. The course is advertised I
as non-ma thematical. 1ro:.IiD. L
Rich is to give a teacher's core for*
those students who are now teachingI
or are preparing to teach' pyis. It
includes an extended sutdy at" physical
apparatus, .bothi that siitable, for hin
dividual laboratory wok andtatde
signed for lecture deoa tratios,
with instruction: inexprerimetal tech-
'nique, present sources o laboratory
material, relative costs andl desirabil
ty of thre more expensiv e eipmhent,
etc.
The :lectro' thery And, radiac-
tivity mil be treated by Prof. A.,W,
Smith. °Among the topis which Ill
be considered 'in 'this courise are the
radioactive disntegration of atoms, te
nature~and roprties of lph, beta,
and gamma rays, the determination
of "the e'lectronic charje, th~e' arrange-
ments of electrons and. protonls to
formi atom, and'f other phases of the
same general problem6. ' An experi-
mental corse in the measuremet of
high temxperatures wil be supervised
by Prose: J M. Bork. Opportunity will
be given to use the gas thermometer,
and v'ros types. of thermo-eectric
and radiatiorn pyoeters. Pof ar-
rison X. Randall, director of the de-
partment' will offer' a course in the
spactrdV' eries , daing with the clas-
sification of spectra and the process-
es which produce' them. He will also
supervise a course in research, which
will be::open to all who are siiiently
prepared and can devote the major
portion,, of their time to independent
investigoation.
Othier members of the summer staffI
who will give instruction in various
of- the 32 summer courses are, Pro-
fessors N. H. Williams, Wr. W. Sleator,
GeorgeA. Lindsay, Ralph a. Sawyer,
Oskar 'R. Klein, and . S. Duffendac.
Frank Schaeffer, glass blower, will in-
struct in the technique of that art.
Museum Receives
Stone aeteis
Stone knives,; scrapers, .a stone saw,
implements to mnake stone tools, and]
bionfs tAnd teeth of animals of the
Old Stone age were recently rceived
by the museumn of anthropoogy from
the Aerican School of prehistoric
Resear l 'no w excavating in' Fance
This o4ganization is lunaced 'by a
group of, univerities, of whic the
U04ivrit is nap ndech year sends
relics to the bivrsity Te research

workers are. headed by Prof. G: G.
MacCurdy, curator of the' Peabody
museum at Yale university.
The remains came 'eom . Castel
Merles Dordogone, France, and are
thought to be between. 30,000 and 40,-
000 years old. The collection jutst
received is comprised of 182 ,speci-
mens.,
Little investment-big. returts, The
Daily Clasies.--Adv.

Entgland Studies
Americasj Flying

11 19. . I

fl'usscyv Pearl Discovery Excites
3 Little Mountain Town In Colorado
When Dr. R. C. Hlussey of the geol- ' finding appeared in The Daily and was
ogy department learned a few weeks' subsequently published in many news-
ago that he had discovered three 1 papers from coast to coast, including
pearls estimaftedl to be at least 240rmi-# the Canon City Record. Determined
heNcn years old, he little anticipated the to overlook no possibility of hidden
execient t hat the announcementt treasures, the greater percentage of
was soon to cause in the- moun- the male population of the town,
fain town of Canon City, Colo. It armed with picks and shovels, headed
I was here that Dr. Hu ssey found the Ifor the stone quarries on the outskirts
ane eit gemns last summer with the ot the town the follow Sunday after-
assistance of A. R. Colghe, electrical! noon and commenced digging. Their
evngineer, cf th-at town. After con-etforts were futile, According to Mr.
,i iderable research work, Dr. 1-ussey Colghe, who wrote Dr. Hussey of the
was convinced that lic had found! inclient, they had been working on
j pearl, of the Cretaceous age. recog-; the slope of granite rock, while Dr.
nized a, a rare discovery. Hussey's pearls were found in sedi-
The news striy' of the geologist's mentary beds.

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D..AY

iVaj-Gen. William S. Brancker di-
rector of, civil aviation in Britain, is
in the United States studying safety
devices, lights, etc., that are being
used to guide night air mail plots.
His government is prepar ing to inst all
day and night air' service moi cs in
the Far East.

Al

THRE TUEATERt
Today-Screen

Arcade--"Sally, of the Sawdust,"
with W. C. Fields and Carol
Dempster.
MMOstic-"Go West," with Bust-
er Keaton.

ealy Every One 4
likes
tHere is the
Old Fashioned Bar
Double Strength Pepperminta
l fyou peferheSugar tae u
Peppermint WRGL'
Clear Thru I P

Wuerth - "A Woman of
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t e

Todsy-Stage z
Garrick (Detroit) - "Kosher
Kitty Kelly."1
IBonstelle, Playhouse (Detroit)-I
"The Song and Dance Man."
Shubert Lafayette (Detroit) -
I"Greenwich Village Follies."
New; Detroit (Detroit) - "The J
Show-Off," with Louis John
('Bartels and IHelen Lowell.

-20I

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HAVE YOU HEARD THE LATEST?
"AFTER I SAY I'M SORRY" By Abe Lyman's Orchestra

Lament for Beow Vilt Hanson
(World Premiere)

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