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January 20, 1926 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

TWO

1"N

TT -IFr:NUH ,MC-.N 'fDAILY

" v 4X-7['46 Vl ,11 1s.1

-.A-IL - ait . * . A I . ./ N i'A.JAJ> 4 IU..,

TO LECTURE HERE,
Dr. F. C. WHoods Will Speak Under The~
Auspices Of Galens, Honorary
Junior .Medical Fraternity
DIREC'TOR AT COLUMBIA

COLUMBIA'S FAMOUS SCIENTIST
WAS ONCE POOR IMMIGRANT LAD

IMONROE.--Fire believed .to have
been caused by defective wiring, dam-
aged the Reaper theater to the amount
of $2,000 recently.

F,

List Of h~In ilricalvetso

MEDITERRANEAN CRIJS!
C-ROUND THIE WORLD, WEST INDIES, ETC.'
S An~y LnsAry Steamier, Any ~~~
Maki: Reservations NOWV~
A Svkail depos tguaraptee.s spc* in aay c~aae
p~iae 6412'Xc. E .KJ fL-
Izci1 Local Agerat .G U BE
ALl.L 'NES CCI E. IHuron St. Anak lm, VMk

'
=1

ITUNIS, North
has visited South
sandstorm which
twon das.

Africa.-A cyclone
Tunista, raising a
lasted more than

Dr. Francis Carte Wood, director
of the institution for caner research
at Coumba university, wll speak on
'"Rublc health Ap~cts of.Cpcer i
lation to Diaiosis Prevetion, and
1rTtenen" vat 8 o'clock tomorr w
night .ig Natural Science auditrium
unider .te auspices of Gi n, liotir-
ary junior-medical soiet, it was an-
nounced yesterday.I
Dr. Wood, who is regarded as one of6ottnigfgrsi h ol
of cancer research, therapeutics, and
popular cancer education today, has
jufst ireturned from Huurope where h
inade an extensive study of a number
of new cancer"discoveries.
After his graduation from the Co-
lumba College of Physicians and Sur-
geons, a two and a half year surgical
internship in St Luke's hospital in
New ;York city, and a study trip
abroad, Dr. Wood returned to St.
Luke's hospital as pathologist, a po-
sition which he has held continuous-
ly for28"years. In 1912, after Colum-
bia university received a gift' of
$1b0,000 for cancer research from
George Crocker, Dr. Wood was select -
ed to direct the work of the institute.
Since Sut. 4%WVhospital and the can-
cer nso tte are in close proximity,
he was ablef to continue his intere st
in clinical mdicne, having been for
yea's atikding "physician to the hos-
pital.
Dr. Wood has installed and at pres-
ent directs an elaborate radio-thera-
peutlti department in St. Luke's hos-
pital., More than 1,000 new cases of
cancer are treated each year by the
department AA great share of Dr.
Wood' time is spent in examining, on
an extensive Sale, conclusions which
have been advanced by other research
workers
kie i tt of the Journal of Can-
cer R; ac, and was one of the or-
ganlz,_ a p4is at present the vice-
presislit, e American Society for
Control o5 icer. He is the author
of.11'! -ilanoi"and "Chemical
and .Mcrosopical Diagnosis" and for
years has been the editor of the fam-
ous text bok on. pthology written
by the late Drs. Delafield and Prudden.
Oniderdonk To Give1
Picture Dialogue
To Tolstoy Club
(Continued from Page One)
Tomorrow's dialogue will ;put on'e
of the lecturer's theories into actualf
practice. Hie has long believed that
little is actually learned from a le-
ture or sermon, but that the speakers'
views may be clearly understood by
the audience if pictures illustrating
the thouht advanced are shown and
ezwlaned. liHe believes that word
peace could be -greatly facilitated by
the judicious use of motion pictures,
alit according to a recent interview in
The Daily, he has written several
scenarios with that view in mind, but
has been inable to secure coopera-
tion i$_ having thenm produced.
IntJ. orrow's talk he will show
picturesllustrating the thoughts hie
wishes td'give his audience and will
interpret these illustrations.
When interviewed yesterday, Dr.
Onderdonk said that he was particu-
larly anxious to correct the common
fallacy regarding Tolstoy as a Bol-
shevik.rain America, he says, where
TtIolstoy is not widely read, people
kiiow n-y that h was a Russian and
a radical and assume that he mrust be
a Communist. The truth of the mat-
ter is that it is against the law in
Soviet ,.ssia; to have his works in
ones' ipo'ession, le also believes
that maney persons regard the Russian
as merely a writer of interesting nov-
els, whxereas_ he considers him the
founder of; -Fgeat philosophy on re-
ligion, ethics, and war.
Dr. Onderdonk continued, "Tolstoy's
significance has not been appreciated
in the protetant west, where a grad-
ual enightment of religious thought
has been developing for centuries, and
many of his conclusions, which sound
revolutionary to southern and western
Europeans, mean nothing in partie-
lar. But what George Fox was for j

England and America, Tolstoy is be-
coming to Russia and Bulgaria. Dur-
ing the first year of the war more
than 300 Tolstoyans refused military
service in Russia. Also in Austria.
there were. Tolstoyan "conscientious
objectors." In these countries the
followers of the writer are united into
national societies numbering thous-
ands of members.
"Who ever has experienced the
Mower of Tolstoy's writings 'realizes
that their influence has but begun
and that this great messenger of Godl
will yct harvest many souls for the
kingdomi. Hi-s works include discus-
sions on the problems of Christianity,
war, sex, and ethics, and provide somne{
cf the most interesting and worth
while reading ever published. In pro-
testant countries we could have no
better weapons to combat militarism
and materialism than Tolstoy's books,
c r he is the prophet whom God sent
for this age."

(By Central Press)
In 1374 a 16-year-old lad from B!
grade, Michael Pupin, came to Amer--
lca as an inimigrant steerage pa:-, -=
senger. Today(i(he is a professor of°
el~Ctro-,mchlanics at Colunmbia ._ihi'T s i e l' s
v and thl ~ie incoming pi sident of Tat1els=s
,ythe Amen ,:an A.ssociation for the Adl-
Ivancement of Science. r ,
Dri. PupiJn arrived in this country 1= a n y 1011ete
With but five cents in his pocket afl(1
one' suit of' clothes. h1is 'first job I- j'
was (lI v~iig a team of mules on a! a r i v
Delaware farmi. IHe was graduted an wr1na'l
f, om Colunnbia university and afte~r 1o
furthr mul)Cll~lltstudy he decidled i n i at sae iu
to go to (;ermwny to perfect himself t s d d
for a se eifltifi(' career.
! W hen a lepirtm ent of engineering 1 1p r e T r e fl ' " ws op n d a , C lu b a r upnIw s p t n c a g . W h l- i m
of the Columbia faculty hie has has,
'several important inventions in the -
electrical field to his cred it. The first
X-ray photos to lbe nmade in Americ aI
to drive a nmule team. - W r a .-
Many mesdals aind honors have been
bestowed upon hime in recognition of .
hisc-fetiicresearch. -D a
I -
Harvardb'o' rIs
Honord AboadtAnn rborDairy Coo
ICAMBRIDGE, Mass., Jan. 19.--Fo< E O EOF PR°M L
the second time since its fondation E IIO F U E-
an American has received the mathie-
matical lprize awarded by the Royal IIIIIsilllliIli IIlIiIwliIII1iIIiiiIUIIlIIIllhiIIIi#'Il IIliIIIII~ilt~~~illt 1I IjII ji

Dr. Micintel I. Tulin
etroit Will
Hear ConcertI
By Glee Club
Under the sponsorship of the Vor-
tex club, a noonday luncheon organi-
z ation, the Varsity; Glee, club will pre-
sent a concert on Thursday, Feb. 4,1
In, Detroit..,rThe concert will be held
in the auditorium of the. Cass Techni-
cal high ,ichool, which, it is said, is
the largest in the city.
FAll the preparations for the concert
are being made by the members of the
Vortex club and the proceeds will
go toward the building fund of Camp
Brady, the official camp of the Detroit
Council of the Boy Scouts of America,
which was recently destroyed by fire.
A scout bugle corps will open the pro:
gram and a group of scouts will stage
a demonstration of scoutcraft during
the intermission and after the concert.
}In 'addition to the regular numbers
given by the entire club, Barre Hill,
'26, and Otto C. Koch, '27, will render
solos, according to Kurt J. Kremlick,
'26, student manager of the club.
'he Intercollegiate Glee Clubs, Inc.,
will hold their annual convention in
Chicago on Feb. 22, to determine the
best glee club in the mid-western col-
leges and universities. The winning
club will go to New York later in the'
year to compete with the best organi-
zations in the east, to decide the na-
tional championship. Theodore Iar-
rison, director of the Michigan club,
will take 24 men to Chicago with hime
on. this trip. While in Chcago, the men
wil be the guests of the Michigan
alumni at their weekly luncheon.

'

Academy of Belgium. This time Prof.
W. C. (rauiistein of. the department
of Mathciatica of Harvard university
has been successful in competition fcr
this trophy.
FIRST S1111I)ENT-PRI~NTED M
ANNUAI, APPEARS AT IOWA
IOWA CITY, Iowa, Jan. 19.-*For the
first tine in any American univer-
sity, a junior annual or year-book
will be printed. in a student ownedl
printing plant, when the 1926 Hawk-
eye, annual of the University of Iowa,
rolls from the presses of the student
publication body here.

Dangerous
acids

r

2O° Discount
On Our4

Entire

Stock

Cross-section of a
tooth, showing Acid
Dec"y at The Danger
Line.

Acid Decay, re-
suit from foods
which collect
and ferment

--which

cause

APPLIED ARTS
2 Nickels Arcade
The Slop for Unique Gifts

in those

tiny

PAY YOUR SUBSCRIPTION- NOW.'

V-shaped crev-.

1'

ices where gums meet teeth-

Whitne THEATRE j n2
hit OYONE NIGHTJa 2
Orchiestra $1.40, Balcony $2.00, $1.50, $1.0) Plus Tax
SEATS NOW SELLINGn
Tl'l oe11 fiing D~esirable Locations Wlill
Find It, Advisable to Secure :P'icket's Now.
FRESH FROM FOUR WEEKS TRIUMPH
IN DETROT
r E fL .uHSE !S ATEf16N 4ru 0R

I
l

The Danger Line.

Squibb's

Dental Cream, made with

Squibb's

Milk of

Magnesia,

;safely. and promptly neutral-
izes these 'dangerous acids-
safeguards your teeth from
Acid Decay and relieves sen-

sitiveness.

Use it regularly.

At druggists.
SqU IBB'S
DENIAL CREAM
'A/oe wirthtquibb&Milk ofM~nesi
R." R. SQUIBB & 'SON~S, Chemists to t'he
Dental and Medical Professions since 1858.

with -111. MULLIGAXN and Mll.G RRTX
Tha "Tbi9 =,'Chilling, uEiihug'" i in oci B X. -
* Tha "ThillinAli The~ater Records in,
INEW YORKOSTON L061D
FUNNIEST SHOW ON EARTH

0 1925

,

i4

Ben Bernie and Elis Orchestra
Have, Made .a' New Electrically Recorded
Brunswick Record that you should hear

i

I

THE BRUNSWICK
PANATROPE
Have you seen and heard this re-
markable instrument yet?
If not, a real treat is in store for
you. We are unable to adequately
describe it here except to say that it
is neither a phonograph nor a radio
but an entirely new musical instru-

Ask to
I-lear
No. 2992
Also
No. 2990
and
No. 3013

A LITTLE BIT BAD--Fox Trot
SLEEPY TIME GAL
Ben Bernie's OrchestIra
I FOUND SOMEBODY TO LOVE
SLEEPY TIME GAL
N~ick, Lucas
MIAMI
YOU FORGOT TO REMEMBER
Al Jolson w'ith Carl Fenton's Orchestra

ii

i 1

C

5

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