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October 01, 1925 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-10-01

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ORION

TIH'E MICHIGAN DAILY

French And American Debt Commissions Sit In Joint Session

PROF, BADtRU
Prof. W. L. Badger of the chemical
engineering department carried on re-
search work during the latter part of
the summer at the potash plant of the
American Troma corporation in south-
eastern California.
This factory, which is located in

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1925
one of the most desolate cornersa
the United States, was onie of se r-i
al that were started as war projets
when the supply of potash from G er-
many was stopped. This plant.f,
which Professor Badger asslsted;j""
now the only one that has surviv~d
the renewed foreign competion.
Both potash and borax are mapl
factured by this concern from depoits
left by an old salt lake. From its
residue this factory produces 95 per
cent of all potash and one-half of all
the borax made in the United Stat.ds.

,. saa.a.w arw r. rraarwaarani .aa a rra araw n , pp
1 1

been appointed special lecturer at I
the University for the second semes-
ter, according to Dean J'ohn R. Ef-
finger of the literary college. Pro-j
fessor Cestre will offer two conrses1
during his stay of one semester, one'
in the Romance languages depart-I
anent on contemporary French culture'
and another in the English depart-
ment of the chief American poets of
today.
During a visit to Ann Arbor sev-
eral years ago Professor Cestre de-
livered a series of lectures on "French . n Seeking agreement on arran
Ideals." He first cane to America sound each others ideas in the co
as one of the to Frenchmen on the Auriel; Senator Louis Daussett, Sc
as ne f he woFrechmn n te Ion, Under-secr~etary of Treasury Vt
James Hazen Hyde scholarship for don, u rt ryOo; TeasryP
French studies at Harvarduniversity, dore E. Burton of Ohio, Senator P
25 years ago, and has remained in Bokapowski, Marquis de Chambrun
close touch with the affairs of this
country since. With the establish-#I
ment at the close of the war, of a IlL A E I
course in American literature and'il o aU Infe
tivilization at the Sorbonne, Professor
Cestre was appointed to the new lee- T IS [TN
The po~itical works of Robert Frost,
present holder of the fellowship in Prof. A. S. Warthin of the patho-j
creative arts at the University, long logical department in the Medical
ago claimed the interest of Professor school returned yesterday from Lans-1
Cestre and it was at his instigation ing where he attended the meeting
that the study of Frost was added to of the Mississippi Valley conference,
the program of the French university, an association of 13 states interested
in the campaign against tuberculosis.j
East Engineering The'founders of the anti-tuberclosis
Building Painted vited to attend this session.
Professor Warthin was host at the
During the intermission between founder's table at which approximately
summer school and the fall session, all 150 pioneers in anti-tuberculosis work
the roonmst oftTh"East Engineering night. Following the banquet he ad-
building were redecorated. night. ollowing the banquet he ad-
The offices have been finished with dressed the gathering on "Changing
cream-coloredw'vIlI and white drop Views in Regard to the Mode of Infec-
ceilings, while the laboratories have tion in Tuberculosis."
1een made completely white, so as More than 700 attended the meet-
to take advantages-of all light en- ing.

EXCELLENCY

aid

In hand work is our proven, motto.

tion to youxg men's
deliver.

Woolen garmen

We pay special atten-
its. We call for aend

g ements for refunding of France's war debt to the United States the French and American debt commissioners
onferences in Washington. Photo shows the commissions in joint session. Seated: (l. to r.) Deputy Vincent
en ator Fernand Chapsal, Senator Reed Smoot, of Utah; Secretary of State Kellogg, Secretary of Treasury Mel-
Winston, Senator Henri Berenger, Secretary of Commerce Hoover, French Finance Minister Caillaux, Rep. Theo-
au l Dupuy, M. Daeschner, French ambassador. Back row (1. to r.) M. Haguenin, Joseph Simon, Deputy Maurice
, Oliver Moreau, and M. Lacour-Gayet.

THE MO LAUNDRY

'i

s
.

$ =:

sn

urial Place Of Pre - Historic
Americans Will Be Built Anew

(By Associated Press)
Chillicothe, O., Sept. 30. - Mound
City, the burial place of a clan of pre-
historic Americans, is to be recon-
structed near here this fall with the
aid of"modern implements. Upon thej
faintly traceable remains of the littlej

various mounds, tablets are to be
erected telling in brief the signifi-
cance and history of each mound.
Mound City is situated on the west
bank of the Scioto river, four miles
north of Chillicothe. It is a nearly
square enclosure, with rounded cor-

[CIVIL ENGINEERS WILL
GIVE LUNCHEON1 FRIDAYT
Robert Ridgway, president of the
Society of American Civil Engineers,
will be guest of honor at a luncheon
given by members of the local student
chapter of that organization, Friday
noon, Oct.' 2, at the Union. George
H. Fenkel, superintendent of the de-
partment of water supply in Detroit,
will act as toastmaster. Prof. Wil-
liam C. Hoad, of the municipal eng-
ineering department, is to give a brief
talk on the relation of the society to
the University.
Mr. Ridgway served as engineer in
charge of construction on the New
York Transit commission, 1866 to
1900, and also engineered the Catskill
water supply project for New York
City.

r,. . _.
""-

l 5
1'1

Moscow, Sept. 30.-A military dele-
gation representing the Chinese Chris-
tian general, Feng Yu-Hsiang, ar-
rived here yesterday to study politi-
cal and economic conditions in Russia.

1. a

man-made hillocks, are to be rearedIners. There are known to have been
new structures of the supposed orig- 24 mounds within the walls at one
inal heights and shape. The restora- time, although only 12 are now dis-
tion, which is to begin within a few tinguishable.
days, will be done by the Ohio Ar- Much of the reconstruction work
chaeological and Historical society. I will be based upon the survey and re-
After the enclosing wall and its 24 port made in 1846 by Squier & Davis,
individual mounds are reconstructed British archaeologists and engineers.
and sodded, the plot will be dedicated At the time of their excavations on
as an Ohio state park. The park will the site, they diagramed the group,
be comprised of 35 acres, the earth- showing the exact distances between
works themselves covering 15 acres., the mounds, their location, and di-
Through the preserve,, drives are to mensions.
be constructed, shelter houses are to
be erected, and a suitable landscaping Subscribe for The Daily today at
arrangement will be made. At the the office in Press Building.-Adv.
A Daily Editorial
REPRINTED FROM 311MIAN DAILY
MTAY 21, 1925I
T RE LECTURE SERIES
For more than forty years the Oratorical Association has been
sponsoring lecture courses, and with each-succeeding year the char-
acter of the speakers becomes more diversified and interesting.
Speakers that are of importance in national and international
life make great impressions on us, and their value for good can not
be doubted.
Everystudent should be able to find more than one speaker on
the next course in whom he is interested. We all have some thirst
for contact with great personages, no matter what their field. What
they sly oftentimes has a more lasting effect than that which we
hear in the class, room.
)Lail Orders Received by Treasurer, Oratorical Association
Room 211, Angell Hall
Prices $3.50, $3.00, $2.50 .
for Course of Ten Lectures

fTopcoats
for these
chilly
SAutumn
evenings.
Newest
Box Coats
at
$25 to $40.00
its
LUTZ

,
ti
.
C
'
i

(I
I)

THE YORKSHIRE
A single-breasted style, with the wide sholders
and snug hips.
Twopair
Trousero

k_

£a

Hart, Schaffner & Marx and

Kincaid-Kimball

The best in Flowers and
Decorative Plants

l
4
s
I
!

Clothes. Complete line of snappy fall furnishings.
CONLINCANY
"Successors -' ,l-m -onIii Co."
118 East Washington

r
I- s

Greenhouses:
1400 Traver St.
Phone 8807

Flowers =by:'Wire.

Announcing
T~ CE'S

GLOTHING

(Downtown)

STORE

r

Freshmen and
a grade "C
re eligible to

-,AL 0

709 North University-near the

Arc.

On the Campus

1
at
ft
t
IIl

Opens at
Ambassador
Theatre
New York
Next Month

'PuIU --

See It
Before
New York
Sees It

wHTNEY " EAT E
SATURDAY and SUNDAY, Oct. 3 and 4
RICHARD HERNDON Presents
The Tremendouslv Popular Corncd Succes"

.
r,
f
R"
y.y

1

We

are featuring the best

0

Malted Milks and Choco-
late sodas in the city.
GILBERT'S AND
~ Ir A T"\T'TT A m T A CT1 TTyf " XT 0 A XTr1

By BARRY CONNERS
Ran Continuously for 'Six Months at LaSalle Theatre. CHcago
Excellent Cast and Production
AMY LESLIE, the eminent critic of the Chicago News, said: "j verybody
should go and see "APPLESAUCE' You will be refreshed and taught
something between, laughs. The exquisiie cleanliness, the homeliness and the
truth of it plants a joy in the listener's heart which clings."

- WYJP-------- ---

i1

N

%, , 7.1

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