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January 08, 1926 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-08

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PAGE P1iOUJR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

____ I-

Published every. morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control ef Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association:
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
Ritled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otnerwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by Mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
sard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF' u
Telephone 4923
MANAGING EDITOR Ii
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board. Norman R. hal
City Editor........... Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor.........Manning Housewortl
Women's Editor.......... Helen S. Ramsay
Sports Editor..........,..Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor........William Wafthour
Music and Drama...Robert W. Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Willard 1. Crosby Thomas V. Koykka
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterso
Assistant City Editors
F'win Olian Frederick H Shillto
Assistants
Gertrude E. Bailey Helen Morrow
William T. Barbour Margaret Parker
Charles Behymer S tanford N. Phelps
William Breyer Marie Reed
Philip C. Brooks Simon Rosenbaum
L. Buckingham Ruth Rosenthal
Edgar Carter Wilton A. Simpsaz
Carieton Champe Janet Sinclair
Eugene H. Gutekunst Courtland C. Smith
Douglas Doubleday Stanley Steinki
Mary Dunnigan larissa'Tapson
Fames T. Herald Henry Thurnau
Miles Kimball David C. Vokes
JskJf1on hCubi Chandler J. Whipple
Walter H. Mack Cassam A. Wilson
Louis R. Markus Thomas C. Winter
:.is Merry Marguerite Zilszke

u~

i

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

Advertising.............Joseph J.,Finn
Advertising. .. ......... T. Uv. Olmsted, Jr.
Advertising...........Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising................Win. L. Mullin
Circulation........... -H. L. Newman
Publication............Rudolph Bostenmau
Accounts...............Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving F. A. Norquist
George H. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
W. Carl Bauer Julius C. Pliskow
John 'H. Bobrink Robert Prentiss
W. J. Cox Wmn. C. Pusch
Marinn A. Daniel Franklin J. Rauner
A. Rolland Damm Joseph Ryan
james X. Deeuy argaret h
Mary Flinterman Mance Solomon
1argaret L. Funk Thomas Sunderland
Stan Gilbert Eugene Weinberg
T. Kenneth Haven Wm. J. Weinman
Rt. Nelson Sidney Wilson
FRIDAY, JANUARY 8, 1926
Night Editor-WILLARD B. CROSBY
"OF GREATEST VALUE"

Young Women's Christian association.
actually is $4,500, but the women on
the campus are asked to raise only
four-ninths of this amount.
How successful these two drives
will be is now unknown. Each of the
two organizations was able to raise
the desired amounts in the campaigns
of last year. The success or failure
of the drives this year will show to
an exact degree how far the interest
of this campus is directedatoward the
support of religious matters. By
giving its support in a financial way,
the campus can endorse the work of
the organizations and insure contin-
uance for another year.
'TIS OLLY TO BE ROYAL
Stripped of the heritage that is
rightfully his, and with the necessary
civil procedure for a divorce from his
wife, the Princess Helen of Greece,
having been started, Prince Carol,
until a few days ago heir apparent to
the Toumanian throne, seems fairly
besiged with trouble. At present,
however, the gentleman with a thou-
sand accusations upon his head is liv-
ing quietly at the Hotel de la Ville in
Milan, Italy, where it is said, a certain
Mms. Magda Luspescu is also stay-
ing.
On the face of it, the whole affair
might conceivably be compared to
some of the better scandals many of
our metropolitan newspapers so glee-
fully and bombastingly headline. But
if the truth were known, a great share
of the trouble might be laid at the feet
of Queen Marie, wife of the present
ruler, King Ferdinad, of whom it
might tritely be said, "she wears the
pants."
Educated in England, popular with
the people because he can speak their
native tongue better than any of his
family, Prince Nicolas, her second
son, early became the queen's favor-
ite. As her prejudice grew in his
favor, she became more and more de-
termined that he and not the right-
ful heir should succeed her husband
to the throne. And then there was
some talk of a love match between
the heir apparent and a woman of
lower station.
The ambitious and (clever queen,
aided by her political ally, Premier
Bratiano, whom she dominates as the
others, has been working for years
to accomplish in some way or other
her eldest son's disinheritance.
Carol, realizing that both the popular
choice and the plans of the court and
cabinet were against him, and driven
to fury by the sudden breaking off of
his earlier love affair, concluded it
best to have done with it all. Rather
than allow the plans of the queen
and Bratiano slowly to mature, he
took the matter into his own hands,
and seems to have quite exploded the
court andscabinet with all their well
laid 'plans. II hs "renounced the
throne,-his small son, and not the
odious brother, will fall heir to grand-
father's crown.
Aside from being a rather messy
affair if one delves too deeply into
the supply of fact material, this little
broil in a state hardly as large as
Ohio would make an interesting plot
for some enterprising young novelist.
And apart from being rather a dis-
comforture to the crown prince--
rather a disconcerting handicap, this
business of being disinherited-the
whole thing makes a good story.
HOUSING THE EMBASSIES
Representative Porter, of Pennsyl-
vania, who is chairman of -the House
foreign relations committee, recently
introduced a bill providing for the ac-
quisition or erection of American gov-
ernmental buildings in the foreign

capitals of the world. The measure
is designed to put the foreign service
on a more efficient and businesslike
basis. Representative Porter believes
that government owned buildings will
not only be superior to the present
rented ones, but that the agencies will
also be far better equipped to take
care of the enormous increase in for-
eign trade.
At the present time the rentals be-
ing paid by the United States in for-
eign countries amount to more than
$500,000 annually. There are 51
diplomatic missions, and only 12 of
these are housed in government-own-
ed buildings, with two new buildingsl
now under construction. There are
296 consulates general and consulates,
according to available figures, and
only four of these are housed in gov-
ernment-owned structures.
It would appear inadvisable to pur-'
chase property for every government
agency, not only because of changing
economic conditions but also because
of the necessarily high "overhead"
which would have to be met. If the
smaller agencies can be taken care
of in good rented buildings, there is
no reason why the nation should suf-
fer the higher expenses of maintain-
ing government property. However,
the embassies should be housed in the
most adequate and finest structures

ST LL
THEY RATE TO
SHOOT I1ECKYI"
We forgot to mention one of the
most unusual things about this "A
Better Michigan is a Better Michi-
gan" stuff. The Philosophy prof.
called us up early yesterday morning
to tell us that we had entirely missed
the point. He claims that the point is
that it is one of the few statements
the converse of which is unquestion-
ably true.
* * *
SEEING CERTAIN CITIES
CHAPTER III
PHILADELPHIA
The policemen all wear white Sam
Brown belts over their uniforms in
this city. This shows the great work
which Gen. Butler did with that
force. Before he came they did not
wear belts and the poor drunks con-
tinually mistook them for chauffers
and became confidential Now nobody
can mistake one of them whether he
be drunk or sober. Consequently they
have cleaned up the city (or at least
they never witness any crimes' of any
kind any more) and Gen Butler has
'quit and everything is fine.
Gen. Butler
No bit about Philly would be com-
plete without mention of General
Smedley Butler. When it became evi-
dent a few years ago that this city
was becoming too wet for words, it
was thought best to import some
military man to straight&n things out
a bit. Of course, Gen. Butler was the
ideal man for being a Marine he knew
how to handle matters both on land
and on water, so nothing could be too
wet or dry for him.
Well, he worked two years at the
pumps and finally, the town began to
I dry up. But then the fun began. It
seems the Mayor and others were all
for this clean-up business, as long as
they could have their drinks; but
among the places which Butler closed
was the Hotel Bellevue-Stratford, (or
something like it) which was serving
the real stuff to anyone who had the
wink and the money. But by a strange
co-incidence this happened to be just
the place where the Mayor used to go
of an evening for his little swallow,
and he resented the police action
very much. A row insued and contin-
ued for sometime until for one reason
or another Butler quit. The police-
men, however, still wear the white
s belts, as we have said before.
Sleep
Philadelphia is a wonderful city to
catch up sleep in, but in spite of that
fact many of its citizens go south in
winter for their vacation. The city
boasts of the U. of Penn, though their
seems to be no reason why they
should. In this town is located
Franklin Field (named after the man
who founded the Sat. Ev. Post) which
the exact location upon which one
Grange did several hundred yard
dashes and other sprint events, not in
a track meet, as one might suppose,
but in a football game against the
above mentioned institution.
Narrow
The streets of Philadelphia are
{ usually just wide enough to allow
them to lay the standard car tracks
for trolleys in them. Where there are
street cars there can be no auto-
mobile traffic at all. The streets also
seem to have become warped by the
stress of many years of use. At any
rate they are seldom straight, either
horizontally or vertically.
* s s
T E .NEXT CITY WHICH WIL1
BE DISCUSSED IN THIS COLUMN

IS WASHINGTON, D. C.
* * s
POETRY
(So You'll Know)
I
Oh, why did they have to shoot
Becky?
My life is a blank now she's dead
Oh why did they have to shoot
Becky
I wish they'd have shot me in-
s ead.
II
She had more pull than any I've
seen since
She was always so willing and!
kind
If she'd lived in the time of some
Royal Prince
She'd have never been out of his
mind.

. .1

TONIGIIT: lThe Interpretation Con-
test in University hall at S o'clock.
TONIGHT: The Spotlight Vaude-
vile in the Mimes theatre at 8:15
o'clock.
s S"
THE TIMES
The three leading papers of the
civilized continental world have said:
"You are out in the ether. Cosmo-
graphic revolutions throw stars and
planets against one another. Worlds
come into being with majestic slow-
ness, dissolve and reform in clouds
of luminous gas and liquid. A great
calm, a deep silence surrounds this
fairy world. You are face to face with
the culminating point in esthetics-
the Clavilux."
-Le Matin, Paris, France.
"Thomas Wilfred, who produces
color melodies from a keyed instru-;
ment as a pianist would produce
sound, held his audience spellbound.
There were many well-known mu-
sicians, painters and sculptors in the
audience and from the reception it
was evident that a new art form was
receiving recognition. It was more
brilliant, novel and strange than any-
thing that has been seen in a concert
hall or theatre for many years."
-The Times, London, England.
"Thecolor organ has a distinct ef-
fect on the audience, more subtle than
music, more evasive than sound, of a
rarified character and calling on sen-
ses not yet fully active. These colors,
these forms, utterly unconnected with
anything we have known heretofore,
have an emotional effect that is start-
ling and incomparable; they set the
imagination free and they are by turn
amusing, exciting and menacing, with
flashes of quite unearthly beauty.'
-The Times, New York, America.
And the Music and Drama column
of The Michigan Daily said:
"All theories end at the point that
art becomes perfect when it -reaches;
perfect abstraction. If this be true,
Thomas Wilfred's Clavilux as the
father of an eighth art of light towers
in its amazing possibilities above the
accepted seven. His concert last
evening drew an audience that filled
to capacity both balconies of Hill
auditorium and save for a few seats
the entire main floor. Naturally Mr.
Wilfred will be engaged for another
recital."
Mr. Wilfred is filling a return en-
gagement Thursday evening, January
14, in Hill auditorium at promptly
eight o'clock.

MANN'S C"DAM
'A Wiser and Better Place
to Buye."
Watch for Our New Spring Line.
Hats Cleaned and Blocked.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.
(Where D. UT. I. Stops at State St.)

Dancing Tonight
Granger's is the first place to think of on Wed-
nesday, Friday or Saturday nights. The music,
as usual by Jack Scott and his 10-piece Club
Royal Orchestra. We are equipped in every way
to make your dance enjoyable.
7C
*r *~,

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE

MUSIC
AND
DRAMA

11

FROSH BIBLE EXTENSION SERVICE
FRESHMEN DISCUSSION INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
GROUPS STUDENT CONFERENCES
RELIGIOUS INSTITUTES LANE HALL AUDITORIUM AND
FRESH AIR CAMP MEETING ROOM ALWAYS
UNIVERSITY SERVICES OPEN
VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE UPPER ROOM BIBLE CLASS
Help the S. C. A. Continue These Activities. Support the Financial Drive Today.
Courtesy Graham's Book Stores.

4-

When Michigan and Northwestern
meet at Evanston tomorrow night in
the first game of the 1926 Big Ten
basketball season, the Wolverine
players and spectators will be guests
at the presentation to Timothy G.
Lowry, Northwestern's center and
captain of the 1925 Purple football
team, of the silver football, the trophy
presented annually by the Chicago
Tribune to the Big Ten football play-
er judged to be of the greatest value
to his team during the gridiron sea-
son. Michigan appreciates this op-
portunity to join in honoring a great,
Northwestern athlete, feeling that his
portsmanship fully equals the play-
ing ability for which he is being
rewarded.
It is especially appropriate that theJ
Wolverines should be furnishing the
athletic opposition and a share of the
applause for the winner at this time
when it is remembered that Benny
Friedman, captain-elect of the 1926
Michigan football team and star of
the 1925 Conference champions, was
rated second by the Tribune judges by
the close count of 23-18. And Lowry
probably advanced his greatest claims
to the honor by his handling
of his team and his playing at the
center of the Purple line in the mu(
of Soldiers' field last November, when
Northwestern gavetthe Wolverines.
their only defeat of the year, 3-2.
Michigan joins Northwestern in ap-
plauding the Tribune's choice for
1925, and hopes that the sportsman-
ship that characterized the season in
which Lowry was so successful will
be continued when the two univer-
sities meet in another form of ath-
letic competition tomorrow.
OTHERS GIVE THEIR TIME!
Practically every college and uni-
versity in the country experiences,
sometime during each school year, aE
financial drive among its students forc
the pu rpose of raising funds to sup-
port the religious organizations of its
campus. Since the resumption ofc
classes following the Christmas vaca-i
tion, the Student Christian association
has been endeavoring, by means of so-i
liciting every male student, to raiset
its annual budget of $5,500, whichi

* * *
THE INTERPRETATION CONTEST
The Interpretation Contest, as the
feurth number in the Play Production
course, will be held this evening in
University ball at eight o'clock. Mar-
guerite Dutton is chairman of the
program, and the judges will include
Prof. J. S. Lathers of Ypsilanti, Dr.
C. D. Thorpe, and Professor Eich.
There will be the following selec-
tions:
"Wet Weather Talk"..............Riley
"Martha Ellen"a Rile
Donald Lyons
"The Sirrup Cup".......T John Hay
"CrossingC teBr".....r...Tennyson
Catherine Moriarty!
"Telling the Bees".......... Whittier
Thomas Pryor
"Three Years She Grew". Wordsworth
"Break, Break, Break".. .. Tennyson
"The Revenant"... Dorothy Anderson
Elsie Ralston
"The Explorer".............Kipling
Gail Oldham
"Lincoln, The Man of the People"
.Markham
"The Man with the Hoe"..Markham
H. Seligson
"Winken, Blynken, and Nod... .
............ . ...Eugene Field
"Hannah Binding Shoes"........
....................Lucy Larcom
Barbara Allen
"Evelyn Hope" .*........... Browning
"A Toccata of Galuppi".... Browning
Alfred Browning
"Along to'ds Night"....... ..Dunbar
"Ships that Pass in the Nigit".
........................Dunbar
"Encouragement"........... Dunbar
Robert Human
** *
PADEREWSKI
One of the ninnas1cg nf thn -,

IrvingWarrotsD S-C
CHIROPODIST AND
ORTHOPEDIST
707 N. University Ave. Phone 21212
Under New
Management
Our Slogan-
Quality and Service
at Lowest Prices
CHOP SUEY AND
AIllERICAN IINNER
Served at All Hours
SPECIAL DINNERS
11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. & 5:30-8 p.m.
Varsity Inn
512 East William
Looks l1k; SEA ISLAND."
it is"
Ask your college haber-
dasher or shirts made
ofSea Island Broadcloth
-"the Aristocrat of
Shirtings."
SEA ISLAND MILLS, Inc.
New York, N.Y.

THE
GREY
S HOP
Corner Liberty
and Maynard

Hot Lunches
11:00-1:30 5:00-7:00
Afternoon Tea
3:00-4:00
Salads, Sandwiches and Ice Cream
Orders Taken for Sa'ads, Sandwiches
and Ice Cream to Take Out.

11

p.

h* C
ough as a pig's nose
yet soft as a kitten s ear
If you must mistreat your shoes, pick Walk-Overs.
Tramp your slushy sidewalks or crunchy country
roads in this smart style. Walk through one hard
winter in shoe leather as soft as a kitten's ear, tough
as a pig's nose. This is a true Walk-Over, with
foot-fitted comfort to match its value as the best
shoe you ever wore at the price.

PAT.QU.

TR.Yre ARI( REGLA3PAT.f
BOOT SHOP
115 South MaIn St.

'

77

Y
rNs

Read The Daily

"Classified" Columi

.. -

3
i
3

seasflonlin Detroit is ,vromn~ised by+1tho

jI - IIc. I u~ 1 zi j1U11 U ~ n
III announcement of a piano recital by
Oh, why did that have to shoot Ignace Jan Paderewski at Arcadia
Becky? hall next Monday night. Mr. Paderew-
Though for her life I'd grovel and ski's public appearances are always
beg the occasion for rejoicing among mu-
Well, the reason they had to sicians, and his Detroit concert is
shoot Becky especially welcome as we have not
Was the poor, dear old horse heard him for two years.
broke her leg. Although he is not far from his
* * * seventieth birthday, Mr. Paderewski's
The name of that poem, we have de- vigorous health has permitted him to
cided, is "Oh, why did they have to smake another American tour, and he
shoot Becky?" (because that is the is now booked for more than fifty re-

P~f1+0
QULIY
9 /

The Time for Winter Sports Is Here
The ice is good on the river and at the Coli-
seum. Get the skating habit. Shoe skates,
$6.00 and $8.00; clamp skates, $1.25 to
$3.85.
Toboggans-$8.00 and $10.00.
Sleds-$2.50 to $6.00.

PQI4V?
°?' QUALITY. f
loft
GcRio

I

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