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January 08, 1926 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAUTIM 1/1 li1

T ---THE- MICHIGAN DAILY A

1,1P DAY, JANt'ARY 8, 1,)2G

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* ENEERING ExA
DATE ANNONE
Printed Schedules Are Obtainable In
The Office Of The, Secretary
Of The College
WILL LAST FOUR HOURS
Examination schedules for first se-
mester courses in i.e engineering
college are now avaiiable at the office
of the secretary in the West Engi-

REFUSES CROWN

Book Developme
brary Inc)
Development of boosi and printing
is the subjcet o th': exhibit now on
display in the lobby (f the Library.
Various phases of the topic are tak-
en up separately; thus, materials,
manuscripts, early printing, illustra-
tin, binding, and modern printing are
representod in groups.
(lay tablet, with cleniornm instrip-
tions are about the oldest examples
of writ en mater. Prof. Leroy Water-
man of the Sientie s depaIrstment loan-

'learning was for a long time the spe-! There are modern artists, as wel
ut Exhibit A t cial province of the churchmen. those of the time of Dickens, c
The first examples of printing are pared with the illuminated let
ludes Old Tablets important in that they show the firsti and pictures without perspective
crude attempts in this are which revo- the middle ages.
lutionized book making and was so Binding has a special case dev
the finished product are next in point instrumental in thle dissemination of to it. The types of bindings
of developoment. Other examples of knowledge. One or two printer's frem the vellum, calf, oak and le
mediums are: a wooden hand-cut marks can be seen. The woodcuts re- er of former periods to the Mor
prayer hoard, p:gper from grass fiber, veal the task of illustration in those binding o.f today.
vellum, bamboo, and palm leaf docn- days. Specimnes of books from the The last cas.e contains a
mentr. Sessa press, the shops of Caxton examples of the best modern prin
The- manuscripts in the exhibition Manutius, Wynken de Worde, and and printshops, such as the Ricc
include an old HIebrew roll on goat- other pioneer printers contrast with press; Thomas B. Mosher, Kelms
soin, e gospels in Greek on parch- the molren ine work of today, the. Bodley Hea, and the Ox
mntp of Which there are example Illustral ion is 1treated separately. press.

s

oC the work of the 11th, 12th, far
15th centuries. The manuscripts a
mostly religious in character, sin

nd4

Im

ed this material.

Papyrus plants and

neering building.
As In previous years the examina
tion will continue for four hours, th
time arranged being 8 to 12 o'cloc
and 2 to 6 o'clock daily. The tim
for examination in courses which i
determined by the time in th wee
of the first meeting of the class co
incide with those in the literary col
lege with the exception of Monda
1 o'clock classes, which will be hel
from 2 to 6 o'clock on Saturday, Jan
30, instead of the morning of Thurs
day, Feb. 4, as given in the literar
schedule.
Other differences concern tha tim
of special examination and 4 o'cloc
classes. The complete schedule is a
follows:
Monday at 8 Monday, Feb. 1 8-12
Monday at 9 Tuesday, Jan. 26 8-12
Monday at 10 Tuesday, Feb. 2 8-12
Monday at 11 Monday, Jan. 25 8-12
Monday at 1 Saturday, Jan. 30 2-6
Monday at 2 Wednesday, Feb 3 8-12
Monday at 3 Tuesday, Feb. 2 2-6
Monday at 4 Thursday, Feb. 4 8-12
Tuesday at 8 Saturday, Jan. 30 8-12
Tuesday at 9 Thursday, Jan. 28 8-12
Tuesday at 10 Monday, Jan. 25 2-6
Tuesday at 11 Friday, Jan. 29 2-6
Tuesday at 1 Wednesday, Jan. 27 8-12
Tuesday at 2 Friday, Jan. 29 8-12
Tuesday at 3 Wednesday, Feb. 3 2-6
Tuesday at 4 Thursday, Feb; 4 2-6
Drawing 2 Tuesday, Jan. 26 2-6
E. M. land 2 Tuesday, Jan. 26 2-6
C. E. 2 Tuesday Jat. 26 2-6
Shop 2, 3 and 4 Wednesday, Jan. 2
2-6
M. E. 3 Thursday, Jan. 28 2-6
Eh E. 2a Monday, Feb. 1 2-6
Sur. 1 and 4 Wednesday Feb 3 2-6
All cases of conflicts between as
signed examination periods should b
reported for adjustment to Prof. H.
H. Higble room 270 of the West en
gineering building, phone 119, who i
representing the classification com
mittee. To avoid misunderstanding an
errors' each student will receive.noti
ication from his instructor of the tim
and place of examination in eac
course.
MEOCINE SUFFERSLOS
Cabot Lands Graduate Who Was Dea
Of Illinois Medical School
The death of Dean A. C. Eycleshy
mer, '91, of the University of Illinoi
medical college," says Dean Hug
Cabot, of the Medical school, "is a ser
ious loss to medical education."
Dean Eycleshymer after receivin
his B. S. degree from the University
attended Princeton on a fellowship
Later he went to Clark university an
in 1895 he received a Ph.D degree a
the University of Chicago. The nex
year he attended the University o
Cambridge, England, and in 1901 h
received an Austin fellowship to Har
yard university. He received his M
D. degree at St. Louis university i
Dean Eycleshymer was a member o
the faculties of Rush medical college
in Chicago, the University of Chicago
medical college, and the College o
Medicine at St. Louis university. He
was made the head of the anatomy de-
partment at the University of Illinois
medical college in 1913 and dean o
the faculty there in 1917. Dean Ey-
cleshymer was the author of several
works on anatomy, a member of many
medical societies, and he received the
grand prize for embryological work
from the Louisana Purchase exposi-
tion in 1904.
"Dr. Eycleshymer," Dean Cabot
further states, "had been a profound
student of the fundamental sciences
which are the bases of medicine, and
lately had been concerned with the
development of the Illinois medical
school. He was a person of unusual-
ly sound judgment in regard to the
value of the different portions of the
medical course and a person of unus-
ual ability in judging people. His in-
fluence in changing the curricula of
medical schools has been very consid-

erable and his death removes a sound
advisor in this field. He had a very
wide knowledge of his business."
Give Papers At
Language Meeting
Papers were given by two faculty
members of the Romance languages
department at the 42nd meeting of
the Modern language association of
America, which was held at Chicago
last week. Prof. R. Reinhard spoke
on "The Literary Background of the
Chantefable" and Prof. C. P. Wagner
spoke on "The 'Modernizations' of the
Cifar of 1812." Ten faculty members

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Newest photo to reach this country
of Prince Carol, whose renunciation
of his rights as heir to throne of Rou-
mania is the sensation of Europe. It
is reported that he may come to Unit-
ed States, either to enter movies or
engage in aviation business.
Radio Movies
May Be Result
OfIivention
Radio movies may be the result of
a recent invention by V. K. Zwory-1
kins, of the Westinghouse electric re-
search laboratories, who is the first
to make any practical use of the
photo-electric cell principle.
An event that truly startied the sci-;
entific world was the discovery that
when a ray of light falls upon certain
metals, as potassium and sodium, a
stream of electrons is forced out. This
fact was so unexpected that it prompt-
ly revolutionized prevailing ideas of
the structure of matter, and upset the
classic wave theory of light. The elec-
tric current formed by the stream of
electrons issuing from the metal is
minute, but may be detected and made
use of if properly amplifled.l
Zworykin's invention consists of in-
corporating a photo-electric cell in
what is practically a standard radio
1 tube. The tube is elongated and the
electron emitting metal is coated on
the inside of the bulb. The funda-
mental principle of this device is that
the minute flow of, current of the.
electrons emitted, by the metal, con-
trols the current in the plate circuit
of the tube, which. is the telephonic
circuit kown to all users of radio
telephone apparatus.
A practical application of this de-
vice is for use in such places as the
holds of ships, unattended automatic
sub-stations, and storerooms of build-
ings. At the least suggestion of
smoke, due to overheatong from any

The No
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effect. They have a touch of smartness
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out the prices as well.
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TOUAY AND TO MOR R OW
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C AY, JANU A RY 11
IT'S IN TlE AIM-ON EVERYBODY'S LIPS
H.H.iF PAZ E EfCee tfe
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RPtj . usica _ CMedy
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A BREATHLESS, THRILLING, RO
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Latest News

A Paramount Picture
dfWURTHd~rI SY)WIION I
ER'S ORCHESTRA
N. 1). Faleone, irector
WURLITZER ORGAN
Wmi. Skeat, Organist

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Suniday-The Piciure That Succeeded in SiSite of the DevIl-
"THE FOOL"-

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