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January 05, 1926 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1926-01-05

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PAGE FOUR 'I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JANUARY or, 1926

PARE FOUR ~' TUESDAY, YANUARY 13, 1926

.:. :..

Published every morning except Monday
dpring the ?niversity year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
A sociation.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
*iled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
bshed therein.
V~ntered atl the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
0ichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
'f -postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
iaster General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
.:rd Street.
Pbnee- Editorial, 4925; business, 1214
-DITORIAL STAE,
Telephone 4925 i
MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
r ;~ ditorial Board. .Norman R. Thal
i tJto ~,. ... Robert S. Mansfield
Manning Houseworth
.Joseph Kruger
- . .dilr .... William Walthour
Id d)rama .Robert B Henderson
Nignt Editors
mitth H. Cady Lecnard C. Hall
illard B Crosby Thomas V. Koykka
:. erT T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
rin Olian Frederick H. Shillit
Assistants
Gertrude b. Bailey Helen Morrow
".:iliin T. Barbour" Margaret Parker
,,ties Behymer Stanford N. Phelps
Ailiai Breyer Marie Reed
bal C. Brooks Simon Rosenbaum
L. Buckingham Ruth Rosenthal
£dgar Carter Wilton A. Simpson
Carleton Charnpe Janet Sinclair
[-ugene H. Gutekunst Courtland C. Smith
Douglas Doubleday Stanley Steinko
Mary Dunniganl Clarissa Tapson
f ,mes T. Herald Henry Thurnau
iles' Kimball David C. Vokes
-,n Kubik Chandler J. Whipple
Walter H. Mack Cassam A. Wilson
R. Markus Thomas C. Winter
i Merry Marguerite Zilszke
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER
kAdvertising.................. Joseph J. Finn
Adv'tising'.............T. D.lmsted, nJr.
Advertising.............Frank R. Dentz, Jr.
Advertising.................Win. L. Mullin
rc'ation.................-H. L. Newman
~ubatior.............Rudolph Bostelinan
Acoants..................Paul W. Arnold

*

who would attempt to force the stu-
dents into a mould, in order that each
might be like the other, and as near
perfect as the makers of the mould
could arrange. The best man is the
man who can lead,-and who will be
followed. It may be hard to realize
it now, but President Little is lead-
ing,-and he is the type of man that
a student body can and will follow--
gladly.
The representatives of thousands of
American homes have returned to
these halls, and when they cast their
ballots the world will see that stu-
dents and hone folk alike are heartily
in favor of the plans and programs
mapped out by President Little. These
men and women, both of the younger
and the older generation, have con-
fidence in President Clarence Cook
Little, the man, the administrator, the
scientist, the educator, and are ready
to follow him.
IS ANY CAUSE MORE WORTHY
A camp1aign for funds to raise the
endowment of the American Histori-
cal association from $50,000 to $500,-
000 was outlined at the meeting of
that body in Ann Arbor during the
Christmas vacation. The aims of the
organization, as told by the speakers
at that meeting, certainly prove that
it is worthy. The association, now in
its fortieth year of activity, has been
doing remarkable work in aiding re-
search and publication, with only a
meagre fund with which to operate.
Now it is appealing to those who are
interested in its acheivements to help
raise its financial standing.
The services of the association in-
clude the publication of the American
Historical Review, containing a rec-
ord of research and articles by promi-
nent historians; publication of lists
of sources, co-ordinating the work of
research workers all over the coun-
try; recommendation to educational
institutions; issuing surveys of
sources in public archives; expert
advice to such government institu-
tions as the Library of Congress; lo-
cating of valuable manuscripts; and
furtherance of the knowledge of the
history of America's international re-
lations, as that knowledge affects
present-day problems.
Professors and authors from lead-
ing universities, nationally known
authorities on various phases of his-
tory, expressed at the meeting the
hopes of the association for the fu-
ture, emphasizing the "mobilization
of efforts" of research workers. Plans
were outlined for surveys of study,
advising scholars and giving them
suggestions as to subjects that ned
investigation, publishing treatises
which have no prospect of financial
gain but which are still of value to
the historian, and the collection of
documents relating to certain lo-
calities or certain phases of history.
The inspiring addresses of Dean
Ford of Minnesota, J. Franklin
Jameson of the Carnegie Institute,
and Prof. Dixon Ryan Fox of Co-
lumbia encouraging broadmindedness,
good writing, and real achievement
among young men planning to take
up history were convincing enough
to win anyone over to the worthiness
of this cause. Senator Beveridge
gave examples showing beyond doubt
how important a knowledge of th
history of public questions is to those
who try to solve those problems now.
Certainly, after seeing such an array
of prominent and able men deeply in-
terested in the progress of this asso-
ciation, we cannot fail to give this
campaign our hearty support.

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.

L L
ARE
- E
{ It has been one of our fondest de-
sires since early childhood to be the
proud author of one of these Burton
Holmes travelogue effects. You know
-"mln Around Athens," "Tear-
ing thru Transilvania" and that sort
of stuff. But the big hitch is that we
have never done enough traveling to
warrant such an attempt.
Now, however, our golden oppor-
tunity has come. We have not as yet
done any traveling ourselves, but a
friend of ours has just returned from
a tour of thirteen cities in the east
and middle west, which he took in
the company of some hundred other
students who made this journey for
the purpose of presenting a musical
comedy in these cities. It is from him
that we have our information and it is l
with his aid that we begin the follow-
ing. It will be called:
SEEIMN CERTAIN CITIES
CHAPTER I
NOTE: Because of the fact that
many of our readers are only too
familiar with a majority of the
larger cities of this state, we find
it advisable to omit the portions,
dealing with these towns and
start with the City of Buffalo, N.
Y. . (This omission is also found
necessary because it is feared
that should the authors' views
on these cities be published tile
natives of them (who are attend-
ing the University would find
them distasteful.--The Editor)
BUFFALO
Buffalo is the training ground for
all arctic explorers. The town is
filled with them, iand anyone going
about late at night may see them
j "mushing" about the streets with
their dogs and sleds. Theyrdothis
at night only because there are so
many cats in the city that the eskimo

MUSICi
DRAMA

"TA1B 0OUINE"
The Performance in Washington
A review, by W. Calvin Patterson.
In the shadow of the Capitol, "Tam-
bourne" was presented in a laudable
manner, and with the improvement in
acting resulting from the experience
gained on the road, it might well be
said that the show surpassed "Cotton
Stockings." Lively dance numbers,
employing new and truly original
steps, won unanimous approval, and
both the girls chorus and the male
chours were called back for numerous

Stationery Special
A Criip lvhite sheet in the popular long size ivhich regularly
sells at $1.00 for a quire box.
Friday & Saturday
39SC A BOX
Graham'S Book Stores
At Both Ends of the Diagonal Walk.

~- -

s
,)

Assistants
1rg redM. Alvin F. A. Norquist
eorge H. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
W. Carl Bauer Julius C. PliskoW
John H. Bobrink Robert Prentiss
W. J, Cox Wmn. C. Pusch
Marion A. Daniel Franklin J Rauner
- A. Rolland Damns JoseRyan
James R. DePuy argaret Smith
Mary Flinterman Mance Solomon
Margaret a..Funk Thomas Sunderland
Stan Gilbert Eugene Weinberg
T. Kenneth Haven Wi. J. Weinman
R. Nelson Sidney Wilson
TUESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1926
Night Editor-THOMAS V. KOYKKA
HAPPY NEW YEAR.
The congressman returns to his dis-
to confer and argue with his
n i uts. The student returns to
.ho ;e during vacations and, among
':ther things, discusses current uni-
ersity problems with friends and
relatives.
luring the vacation just ended
here were several outstainding topics
o conversation into which University
1.ents continually found themselves
the new President, both as a man
ads a scholar, and, since they have
cted nation-wide attention, his
i ntific viewpoints and the public
justification for same; President Lit-
tie's program for campus prohibition
enforcement; Michigan's great foot-
ball team; the Opera, anything and
erything that can possibly be con-I
ted with a great state university.
Because he is a new man, and be-
cause he is young, and comes from old
New England, President Little and hisI
policies, past, present, and future;,
probably furnished the , outstanding
University subject among the better
informed persons, and, to most ob-
servers our new President seems to
ha e found favor with the people of
thie state and nation, both as a man,
in administrator, and a scholar. This
despite the unfounded rantings of cer-
main persons who attempt to gain pub-
licity for themselves at the expense
(A the re.ptations of others.
At first, -the President's scientific
views and. opinions were criticised,
rizot so miuch for the viewpoints them-
elves, but because the public is not
accustomed to having its better quali-
fied men speak on such subjects. But"
the public has had time to think, the
public has read the reports of a great
convention of scientists, and, to aJ
great extent, that public has stopped
--to admire the courage and farsight-
&dness of the man.
At first, the campustvigorously ob-
ietdt President Little's program
for the enforcement of the prohibition
laws, but the students stopped to
think, to hear the plan and its work-
ings explained, and many students
who were numbered among the "in-
dignants" a few weeks ago have re-
turned to Ann Arbor with nothing but
praise for the plan and for the man
who had the vision, the keen insight

dogs are continually distracted from
their training during the daylight
hours.
Coldness
The reason why these valiant men
of the north have chosen this city
for their training ground is quite
obvious to anyone who has ever been
there in winter. Buffalo is without
question the coldest town in the
United States, if not in the World. In
fact many people advocated this as
the site for the North pole many years
ago when Peary land others were at-
tempting to find a permanent loca-
tion for the explorers' rendezvous.
Perhaps the most :nteresting fea-
ture of this metropolis is Niagara, Falls
which is twenty some miles outside
the city limits. These falls were
originally built there by the Niagara
Falls Power Company, back in 1900.
They are chiefly used to supply elec-
tricity for most of the upper part of
New York state. By a treaty between
Canada and the U. S. part of the falls
were placed in both countries. The
two portions are now known by theI
names of the countries they are in.
Before the power company enlarged
the falls, we learned, there were some
few small falls along the river, pre-
sumably placed there by the Indians,
but these were used only for rolling
off of in barrels and as excuses for
forming a national honeymoon center.
Modern Construction
The falls are said to be the largest
in the country and also the most up
to date, in every way. They are being
improved continually and it is our
hope tha.t the next improvement will
be a heating system for use in winter.
The falls use the regular Niagara
river water and drop in'the usual
way, the engineers who built it being
well acquainted with the law of gra-
vity. About the falls there has grown
up a city of 70,000 persons. It takes
its name from the falls (which are
named after the power company)
Niagara Falls. Very little is made
there except Shredded Wheat, false
beards, and other hair products.
Pierce-Arrow automobiles are made
in Buffalo. Just why we have been
unable to to determine. Lake Erie
has been situated on the outskirts of
Buffalo, but this was purely a munici-
pal enterprise, and is in no way con-
nected with the Niagara Falls Power
establishment. Fresh water is used
entirely in this lake, and has been
found very satisfactory by those in
charge. The lake is used for bathi,
shipping, and things like that by the
citizens of the city.
* * *
TE NEXT CHAPTER IN TOMOR-
ROW S ISSUE WILL DEAL WITH
NEW YORK CITY.
* * 0*

encores.
True, lines had been added, and
there had been a revamping and re-
arranging of numbers, but the com-
pany, nearly at the end of its tour,
presented the show in a way that dis-
played, in the correct light, a really
unusual production.
Difficulties, in the form of stringent
fire regulations forbidding the use of
several of the drops and of playing
in an opera house that is acknowledg-
ed by all to have the poorest acoustic
Droperties of any in the country, were
met by the players and were overcome
in such a way that it was impossible
for those who had not seen the show
before to know that any trouble had .
beenI encountered. Several members
of the cast were clever enough to
make capital of the difficulties and
turn them into subjects for ex-
temporaneous humor.
Dan Warner, as Sonya, was excel-
lent. Except for the fact that he does
not sing any of the numbers, as this
is truly expectedtwhen playing oppo-
site Russel Gohring, who sings so
well, he plays the part with more
feminine grace and charm than did
Lionel Ames in "Cotton Stockings."
His dancing is as good if not better
than that of Ames, and with a partner
such as Stanley Lewy with whom to
dance, his work approaches the best
seen on the professional stage.
Too much credit cannot be given to
Robert Henderson, who played the
rather difficult part of The Black
Queen. With a boautiful form that
was accentuated into a perfect femi-
nine figure by his exquisite gowns, all
his actions were those of a perfect
lady, and his lines were given in a
way that showed understanding of the
part he was playing.
The choruses performed in their
usual manier, displaying excellent
training. Of course, the Palace Dance
was the outstanding number, but the
Fan Dance surpassed all others for
grace and beauty.
"Tambourine" is a production of
which the University should be proud.
Everyone connected with the show in
any way should feel that he was in
part responsible for one of the great-
est operas ever staged by Mimes.
* * *
"THE GRAB BAG"
A review, by Robert Henderson.
Outside of burlesqu'e, Broadway
can tell you, the so-called extrava-
ganza-the revue game-is the safest
knock-down gamble in the show shop.
There is a comedian, perhaps a
comdienne as well, with a box-office
name, a chorus as meat for the but-
er-and-egg men, the specialty danc-
ers, the "danseuse"-what a name for
ankles!-and quaintly enough, relief
in what the barkers choose to call
"artistic tableaux."
The star is introduced, then the
art, then a song and dance, the
comedian again, and on until the cycle
reaches the finaletta at ten forty-five.
This is what New York, and more so
the road, flocks to at three-fity top.
Occasionally they are good, hardly
ever can they fail to please these
charming people for at least a portion
of their three hours-and rarely and
rarely do they actually entertain.
They call Al Jolson the country's
gayest, greatest Sganarelle, when his
technique is not so much more than
Yiddish mammy palaver and a pair of
eyes that can't behave. Perhaps you
like Raymond Hitchcock as much as
I admire De Wolfe Hopper, or Harpo
Marx as highly as Beatrice Lillie...c
They all have reputations, and twice
out of ten times the bathos of Lester
Allen passes for the real pathos of a
Bozo Snyder .

IrvingWarnls,D S C'
CHIROPODIST AND
ORTHOPEDIST
707 N. University Ave. Phone 21212
AKE' 1 "
E MEN
HOLIDAY SALE
ON ALL HATS IN STOCK
Have your hat cleaned and blocked
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State St.)

I .4

1.

Pr

our New Location
te Street-Next to QUARRYS
s Michigan the largest and best equipped
vice station to be found anywhere.
nt
Tell
your friends
Welcome-- We're Glad You're hack
Granger's Academy will continue during 1926
to serve Michigan students as it has before. Come
around and get acquainted-we are sure that you
will enjoy the dances here.
Dancing,
Wednesday 8-10
Friday 9-1
Saturday 9-12
CM; ERNL R ACLEMNY*

M

PLEASE
DON'T
MAKE
PATHS
ON THE.
CAMPUS

Under New
Management
Our Slogan-
Quality and Service
at Lowest Prices
CHOP SUEY AND
AMERICAN 'DINNER
Served at All Hours
SPECIAL DINNERS
11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. & 5:30-8 p.m.
Varsity Inn
512 East William

Natural Interest Holds
at the
GRAYSTONE BALLROOM=I
f - DETROIT
Detroit's smartest ballroom. Two
wonderful orchestras provide con-
tinuous dancing.
Graystone Dancing Nightly Except Monday
-
JEAN GOLDKETTE"'SI
IVICTOR ARTISTS I
You don't know how good until you hear them.

THAT'S THAT
To the Editor:
In my communication of December
10 correcting errors in The Daily
articles treating of Mr. Oswald Gar-
rison Villard, and especially concern-
ing statements that the faculty of the
University had entertained Mr. Vil-
lard, and was further to entertain
him, I made the statement that Vil-
lard had embraced Count von Bern-
storff when the Ambassador embarked
for Germany after his dismissal by
.the President. This statement is
widely current, but Mr. Villard has
assured me that it is untrue, and as I
am unable to verify it, I take this first
opportunity to withdraw it. All other'
statements in my communication can
be easily verified. Mr. Villard did3
send a message of good-will to the
German ambassador after the break-
ing of relations. This act was com-
mented on in the press and I have in
my possession a letter over Mr. Vil-
lard's signature in which he admits
it. After the break of relations and
when we were rapidly drifting into
war, Mr. Villard continued his attacks
upon military training and upon the
officers of the United States army,
and he declared that his sons would

! ti
ti
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3s. ~./l1../w '/"a1. "1, .o. rl". "d./1l.A 1. , I.y.Li'.P././.O."O./'././././"./,"./''1.iw ././1./.Ih%"./;/"./.' ././l/1~J"~./Grr, "1l/.x ' "'

FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101-105 S. MAIN ST.--ANN ARBOR, MICH.-330 S. STATE

{

So with Ed Wynn, this perfect fool.
He is mechanical; the machinery
shows through so seldom, but it is
there all the same. He can make you
laugh in the theater but not two
hours later. Unfortunately his audi-
ences at the Globe theater have dis-
covered the tragic flaw, and New York
never goes to see him twice. There is
no God in the trade!!
His latest production, "The Grab
Bag," for all this, has those things
that count in a wonderful supporting
company-three little Scotch girls
with a style that twists an audience

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OUGHT TO

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Man ill lobby: "Here, boy-
are the initials?"
Bb.: "H. I., sir"
31. i. L.: "No, my name is

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Smith,

DON'T HAVE TO TELL YOU HOW IMPOR-
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