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December 09, 1925 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1925-12-09

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PAGE FOUR

THE, MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY; DECEMBER 9, 1925 '

PAOE FOUR WEflNESDAY, DEC!EMBER 9, 192~'

.fir £wI$&Wu Si1I
Published every morning except Monday
during the Vniversity year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively en-
4itled to the use for republication of all news
dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
lished therein..
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
rMichigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $3.50; by mail,
$4.00.
Of$ces: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
Phones: Editorial, 4925; business, 21214..
EDITORIAL STAFF

Telephone 4925

gr
e *

MANAGING EDITOR
GEORGE W. DAVIS
Chairman, Editorial Board... Norman R. Thai
City Editor..........Robert S. Mansfield
News Editor..........Manning Houseworth
Women's Editor ........... Helen S. Ramsay
Sports Editor.............Joseph Kruger
Telegraph Editor........Willam Waithoir
Music and Drama......Robert B Henderson
Night Editors
Smith H. Cady Leonard C. Hall
Willard B. Crosby Thomas V. Koykka
Robert T. DeVore W. Calvin Patterson
Assistant City Editors
Irwin Olian Frederick H. Shillito
Assistants
Gertrude . Bailey Helen Morrow
Williamn T. Barbouir Margaret Parker
Charles Behymer £tanford N. Phelps
William Breyer Evelyn Pratt
' Philip C.' Brooks Marie Reed-
i. Buckinghamk Simon Rosenbaui
Edgar Carter Ruth Rosenthalsn
Carleton Champe Wilton A. Simpson
Eugene H. Gutekunst Janet Sinclair
Do~uglas Doubleday Courtlauid C. Smith
Mary Dunnigan Stanley Steiek'i
$.,,eT.. Fle"-ld Carissa Tapson
Elizabeth S. Kennedy Henry Thuna
Miles Kimball David C. Vokes
; .Wirion U' Chandler . Whipple
Walter H. Mack Cassam A. Wilson
Louis R. Markus Thomas C. Winter
Ellis Merry Marguerite Zilszke
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214

4

BUSINESS MANAGER
BYRON W. PARKER

Advertising...............Joseph J. Finn
Aed(Vert ising ............-..T 1. lmsted, Jr.
Advertising..............Frank R. en r
Advertising...............Wn. L. Mullin
Circulation ...............- . L. Newman
P b .ation............"" "Rudolph Bostelmnal
Ac nts.................Paul W. Arnold
Assistants
Ingred M. Alving F. A. Norquist
George H. Annable, Jr. Loleta G. Parker
W. Carl Bauer Julius C. Pliskow
ohn if.. Bobrink Robert Prentiss
d,' J. "ox r Win. C. Punch
a,,. 1"Franklin T. Rauner
A. Rolland Damm JosephRyan
~.r,1uy Margaret Smiths
' ary Flinterman Mance Solomn
Margaret L Funk Thomas Sund land
Stan Gilbert Eugene Weinberg
T. Kenneth Haven in.-3.Weinmank
R. Nelson Sidney Wilson j
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1925
°ight Elitor-ROBERT T. DE VORE
"The greatest need of true sci-
ence today is dollars. :The, ayis
gone by when we can depend' very
much upon consequential dis-
covery or inventionbeingrmade
by the~ genius in the garret. A
host of men, great equipment,
long, patient, -scientific experi-
ment to build up the structure of
knowledge, not stone by stone,
but grain by grain, is today the
fundamental source of invention
and discovery. The American
people annually spend ten times
more money on cosmetics than
for the aid of pure science inves-
tigators. Instead of leading all
other countries in the advance-
ment of scientific knowledge, the
United States is far in the 'rear
of the majority of European na-
tions."-Secretary Hoover's ap-
peal for funds for men engaged
in scientific research.

cism from persons who have made a
superficial study of stadium problems.
The attitude of the coach is well
shown by his closing remarks in De-
troit. "If the stadium is not desired
by these interests (the students and
others), so far as I am concerned, that
ends it. However, these are my views
regarding the situation and I cannot
help but feel that they are shared by
others."
The new stadium is not planned for
the benefit of Fielding II. Yost. It
is designed for the good of Michigan
students, thousands of alumni who
are unable to see their team play,
friends and parents of students, for
whom it is becoinifig impossible to
obtain seats, and the citizens of the
state, who are showing a growing
interest in the athletic fortune, as
well as the other developments, of
their University. Yost's plans have
,made a stadium seating 75,000 of
these people possible, with no sacri-
fice on the part of the students, no
expenditure of money by the Univer-
sity itself. What more could be ask-
ed of an Athletic association?
Yost answered all the arguments
advanced by his young critics in his
address to the Detroit alumni-the
absurdity of referring to Michigan's
plan to expand for its own good as al
"stadium race"-the charge that 75-.i
000 people would commercialize col-
lege athletics when 47,000 people will
not-and the accusation that playing]
before a larger' crowd would take the
athlete away from his studies to a
greater extent than playing in the
present Ferry field. Yost has said all
that there is to say. There is no ap-
parent solution to the problem of
ticket distribution other than the
erection of a stadium in keeping with
Michigan's growth.
ART FOR POLITICS' SAKE
Someplace in Iowa there exists a
person by the name of Miss Effie
Cherry, who was once an actress an
left the stage for obvious reasons,
Now it seems that Miss Cherry is
running for a political office with a
platform whose main plank is dis-
tinctly marked "Down with Art." She
actually believes she will win votes
by attacking the teaching of art in the
public schools.
She says, "What do we want to do,
have a generation of artists? I dont
believe in spending so much time and
nney teaching our young people a
fotiof things that' will not help them
get along in the world."
Students in public schools spend
crowi a half an hour to an hour and a
half a week in receiving "instruc-
tions" iii very elemental drawing. But
strange as it may seem, Miss Cherry's
opinions are those with which many
of our mid-western Babbitts agree.
The far eastern states have coie to
the poiunt where they ae beginning
to -pprecate art -anft9ster artists.
It always seems to be ahead of the
West 'in everything. It's about time
that these western towns threw away
their aversions to everything but mak-
ing money. What are they going to do
with all this money if they don't
spend it to glorify their homes and
their countries with memorials, build-
ings, statues, and paintings?
And what is a country remembered
by? By the amount of money it could
accumulate? Hardly! For what 'd&
we remember Greece, Egypt, and other
early civilizations? Not by the clever-
ness of their ministers of finance or
whatever they were called. No, in-
deed, but by the beautiful buildings
and the works of art that were found
in them. The extent to which these
countries developed was judged by
these same works.
Along the Atlantic coast there is a

definite striving to develop real art
and a greater interest in it. XVhy;x
shouldn't the West do the same, and
go a step farther by teaching stu
dents to appreciate intelligently al
higher class of art.
CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of communi-
cants will, however, be regarded as
confidential upon request.
TOLERANCE

111 FREE,
FOR NOTHING
MISS SNORP UNABLE TO MOTE
FROM HME S INCES UN AY
BECAUSE OF HEAVY ICE
Effie Fears Ice On City Streets Ad
Sidewalks Wi Not Hold Her
Weight.
Ann Arbor, Mich., Dec. 9th, 1925.--
Miss Effle Snorp, famed co-ed of the
University of Michigan, has not been
able to attend her classes since last
Saturday, in fact she has not beenl
able to leave her home (exact loca-i
tion unknown) since that time, due to
the heavy snow which, melting during
the day and freezing during the night,
left Ann Arbor covered with an inch
coating of ice.
Miss Snorp has had previous ex-1
perience with ice, she is quoted as;
saying, and she is by this time too in-;
formed to risk an appearance. ' Missi
Snorp has been excused from all her
'eihses by the President and is
spending her time at home reading1
tho"books which she requires in her
'vt i1'us work..
mfi denied violently, last night,
iat there was any political Agnifi-
rPaBce in her solitude.
k . Itce is ice.," she said, and I know
what ,ie is. "Two years ago last
January on Thursday the fourth I
think, or the fifth-anyway I was
walking in a New Years' pagent in
Owosso, anI represented 'a in'-
'Well raini fell not les than sixty-seven
times during that parade. There was
a layer of ice three inches thick,'and
very hard, over the street at the time.
After the parade there were many
small pieces of ice on the same street.
I won't leave this house until
here is no more ice in Ann Arbor
and that is final."'
When asked what she thought of
Red Grange, and the huge salary he
is receiving, she refused to comment.
"lie used to be an Ice-man" was all
she would say.
In spite of the fact that Miss Snorp
is not attending her classes, all
courses in the University will con-
tinue as usual this week, according
to those in charge. XIX
Miss Snorp weighs 357 pounds, ice
or no ice.
hURRAh !
And now, kind friends, we have the
great honor to fulfill our promise and
give you our Christmas present. Here
we have the latest photo of Miss
Snorp, in three colors, a beautiful re-
production of Ann Arbor's fairest fe-
male. Efie is very proud of her pi-
ture, and Wxill be glad to autograph
any of them that are sent to her care
of this ofice. (XIX We think that
would come under department K43.)
Miss Snorp is here seen, as just a
plain co-ed, a mere civilian and she
states that this is her favorite pose.
Her only regret is the fact the
"Wiffo" her pet (an Irish Police dog)
is not showing the camera his mag-
ni icent profile..
MISS EFFIE SNORP
ss

-- l-
Ann Arbor's Fairest Co-ed
* * *
Well, if that isn't enough for you,
all in one day, w* give up.
Sir Toby Tiffin.

I,
TONIGIIT: The Mimes
"Tambourine" lit thIe Whitney
at 8:15 o'clock.
* * .

"TAIBOURINE"
A review, by Kenneth Wickware.
With the rollicking, explosive en-
trance of the Girls' Chorus, in their
tambourine dance, as the thirteenth
number in the first act, the show real-
ly started. It was the first note of
real spontaneity in last night's per-
formance, and the audience responded
in a thoroughly heartening manner.
Dressed in doll's clothes-stockings
striped in red, calico frocks, and
splashy doll faces, with crowning top-
nots of blazing, carrot-colored yarn,
and brandishing tambourines- the
chorus romped the piece into an en-
thusiasm which was rearely allowed
to drag-and never to entirely dis-
appear-during the rest of the even-
ing-.
The music, frankly remeniscent of
bygone hits, was nevertheless the sus-
taining element throughout, achieving
in most cases an adequate suitability,
and often swinging into those delight-
ful rythms which captivate the list-
ener and serve to create a genuine
musical comedy atmosphere,-of mel-
ody and tinsel. Most of the songs
gave one the vague impression that

Chas.
BOOKS

W. Graha m
Moth Ends of the Dagonal Walk

11

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617 Packard Street. Phone 7415.
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YOST'S ANSWER
Coach Fielding H. Yost, who knows
football and who knows conditions at
Michigan far better than most of
those who are loudest in their criti-
cism of his plans for Michigan ath-
letics, once more delivered a plain,
common sense, review of the stadium
question and its obvious solution in
his speech before the University of
Michigan club of Detroit.
Coach Yost was directing Michigan
football aspirants for several years
before most Michigan undergraduates
were born; his guidance during the
last 25 years has been good and there
is no reason for believing that he is
now bent on taking the University
that he loves down the wrong road.
There was an undertone of disap-
pointment when the coach spoke of
the time he visited the University of
Illinois and watched the student body
there subscribe more than a million
dollars for an 'Illini stadium,-of the
time when he visited Minneapolis and
saw loyal Minnesota men give three-
quarters of a million dollars that they
might have a stadium equal to the de-
inands placed upon it. In both cases
the student funds were matched by
alumni subscriptions, and today the
stadia stand as monuments to the
spirit of those universities.
At Michigan. no such camnaign for;

Mr. F Mortimer Shuter
Director of "Tambourine"
they had been heard before-some-
where; in a former existence, perhaps
-but that hardly served to detract
from the'i r effectiveness. The tunes
were always catchy; sonmetines down-
right beautiful. "Ronany Rose" was
the most insistent of all, being some-
thing of a musical motif to the whole;
and then there were "April Days,"
sung .bythe Girls' Chorus; the Finale
to the first pct; and "Azure Skies,"
sung by Rusoell Gohring, in the part
of the Captain.
The choruses furnished the moti-
vating force through the whole per-
formance, making up with their evi-
dent gusto for occasional lack of ab-
solute precision. They were provided
with effective music, and their cos-
tumes were astonishing, even when
considered in a professional light,
particularly so in the case of the Girls'
Chorus. The palace dance, at the be-
ginning of the second act,, achieved a
height of perfection seldom to be
found in professional choruses, and
was truly remarkable as an evidence
of properly trained group dancing.
From the standpoint of staging and
} costuming, the ope-ra was, done with
a gorgeousness that amounts to mag-
nificence. For color, variety, and
profusion the sets are the most eye-
filling that have graced the stage of
the Whitney Theater in many a day.
The great hall in the palace of the
king of Slovania, in the second act,
may be very well compared to the
ballroom scene in the "Student Prince."
Also suggestive of this latter produc-
tion are the swanky, swaggering
guards, with resplendent uniforms,
and clanking swords. In the Ren-
dezvous scene, however, the reversion
to the "Student Prince" becomes a bit
too evident, the action amd formations
of the two being nearly identical.
Unfortunately the book falls short
of achieving the standard set by the
production. Many chances for turns
of wit are missed entirely, and a good
number of the present quips are too
obscure to reach the audience. The
plot is anything but original, and in
places the action drags woefully. The
singing, dancing and costuming alone
make the piece move; and even these
are, at timnes scarcely equal to thet
task.
ilichard Lutes, in the part of Babe
I iadeer, provided the high comedy of
the evening. 13arre Hill, ias King Ru-
dolf, gave a splendid performance-
the power and beauty of his voice{
overshadowing the mediocrity of the
songs given him. Daniel Warner, as
Sonya, and Stanley Lewy, as Johann,
were notable for their clever dancing.
Drama? Perhaps not, strictly. But
it is the sort of thing for which tired
hil lfless men ' f fv five. tn.n .fifte en-

Perhaps we use the term
bfinest foods" too often,
but no other words tell
so exactly the quality
of e'verything we serve

t
t
,a

Arcade Ca4feteriai
Up-stairs, Nickels. Arcade

p. I'

.

%C

MC com"camow

To the Editor:
Granted that a reviewer of campus
dramatics should be honest and if
need be harsh, can he fairly be either
if he is not well-informed and ob-
servant?
The review of Tuesday, Dec. 8,
speaks of "the good old red wig and
radium costumes glorifying the Michi-
gan male." The reviewer is un-
familiar with the difference between
the radium , ostumes used last year
and the entirely different "filter light"
effects employed in "Tambourine."
It is hard to draw the lines demark-
ing a revue from a musical comedy or
from a comic opera. Yet it is the opin-
ion of the writer that "Tambourine"
is more precisely a comic opera than
any of the last four Opera produc-
tions. Revues do not have plots of
any sort. If "Tambourine" verges onj

FARMERS AND MECHANICS BANK
101-105 S. MAIN ST.--ANN ARBOR, MICH.-330 S. STATE

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trick of suddenly giving the audience
ther profile. These are characteristics
not assumed for the moment but a
part of the actor's stage personality.
I cannot agree with the reviewer
that of the hundreds of laughs heard
Monday night only one was an "hon-
est one."
"A consistent Union opera devotee"
must indeed be unusually careless not
to discover the unique difference be-
tween the chorus steps of this year's
show and those of last year and the
years just previous. Of course, there
are certain fundamental movements
and steps which must form the basic

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