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December 04, 1925 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1925

TICF MICHIGAN AI

- U -~ PAGE ELEVE~N

FRmi|IDAY, DECEMBE| , 1q | THE|ICHIGAN1DAI

DEFINITE PLOT I
FEATURE UFOPERA
Comedy Is Involved In Situations And
Songs And Dances Fit In
the Story
L HAS BALKAN SETTING
By Valentine DavIes, '27
It is difficult to say anything about
any play, and particularly an opera,
before it has been given a public
hearing. It is almost embarassing to
be asked to comment on "Tambourine~
at a time when it is primed to open
its run, when every detail has been
carefilly wOr ked out, and when every-
one ccnnected with it is eagerly
awaiting the first night audience.
For a play is not a play until there
is a house before which it may appear.
While everyone may be most enthu-
fsiastic in its behalf, it is almost an
impossibility to predict just, what
scenes and lines will please the spec-
tators. As a matter of fact, np two
audiences,. even in. the same town,
will respond to the same effects two
nights running. While they may all
be opposed to, or very much in favor
of, any given production, they will
never have the same reason for their
opinions.
Neve rtheless, it seems that there are
a. few concrete facts which may be
stated, even at this early date. First
of all "Tambourine" has a very defi-
nite story. It has a plot which car-
ries through the enti-re two acts and
which, regardless of its merits, will
,form a very definite part of the audi-
ence's impression of the play. More-
tver; it is not of the portable type
which is brought on stage every so
often to give the onlookers a breath-
ing space between dance numbers.
-There will be practically no scenes in
"Tambourine" which leave the ,4lot
just where it was. This is because
there is no time for such scenes. The
comedy is entirely involved in the sit-
uations which the story brings about.
The chorus and song numbers are all
quite definitely in the story. They
are not just so many chorines who
come out to dance.
The setting is one of these tiny
Balkan kingdoms which takes itself
terribly seriously. There is a band ,of
gypsies who really don't take anything
seriously, but who spend most of their
time acting as if they did. They are
a light-hearted lot, who enjoy life for
its own sake. There is a princess who
is too modern for her environment,
but not too modern for romance. Into
this little world come two Americans
who naively accept the wildest sug-
gestions and presently find themselves
hopelessly involved in the terribly im-
portant affairs of the little kingdom.
"ITambourine", in one sense, is a
reversion to type. It is much more
akin to the operas of ten or a dozen

Slauonia's King

Barre il, '26
The King of Slavonia, in "Tam-
bourine", whose voice ands to the en-
tertainment of the 20th annual Union
opera.
years ago than to more recent
editions. It is decidedly more like an
operetta than a review. Without for-
feiting any of its richness of setting
and costume, it has stressed plot and
character rather than mere elaborate-
ness.
Mimes. makes this move for the
same reason that the Nabobs of Broad-
way have seen fit to give us produc-
tions like the far-famed "Student
Prince" and the newer "Princess
Flavia." Because it has been found
that one of th-e few things that can be
definitely known about present-day
audiences is that they do want some-
thing more than a pot-pourri of song
and dance.
The setting for the 20th Mimes of-
fering is, obviously, rather well suit-
ed to the type of production which
Michigan has come to expect. The
pomp and circumstances of the gaudy
little monarchy, and the colorful zest
of the gypsies, give ample opportunity
for the elaborate detail of scenery
and costume for which the opera is
known.
Among the costumegs imported by
Lester from Paris for Tambotrine"
are a number of radium garments for
"The Mystics" number, and a set of
spun glass wigs for the women's
chorus in the "Palace Dance."
For the first time since the opera
became a Michigan institution "The
Victors" will not be sung with the fin-
al curtain. "Romany Rose", the ex-
pected song hit of the show, will con-
elude the p'resentation.

'COMIC OPERA TYPE
INFLUENCES MUSIC
Score, Writlen By Milton Petersoni
Contains More Tan 39
Nubers
"ROMANY ROSE" IS HIT
Music for the Union's 20th opera
"Tambourine" is acclaimed to be the
best which has been offered within
a number of years. In style it follows
that of the comic opera music of Vic-
tor Herbert and Rudolf Frimil, which
will make it quite distinct. from any
Michigan opera heretofore. The score,
which contains more than 30 num-
bers, all of which were written by1
Milton A. Peterson, '27L, is larger
than that of any other college pro-
duction in the country as well as that
of the average professional musical
comedy.
Probable hits in "Tambourine" will
be "Romany Rose" and the "Rendez-
vous" waltz. The former is light and
tuneful and the waltz has a flowing
melody which is expected to catch the
popular fancy. Four other numbers,
"The Fortune Teller", "The Cameo",
"The Enemy", and the "Finaletto", ap-
proach light opera. In that respect
they stand apart from other compo-
sitions in the show. Other catchy
numbers are "April Day", "Fine
Feathers", and "If Any".
A singing chorus of 48 is being
trained by Theodore Harrison of the
School of Music. Several numberss
have been arranged for part singing
land rehearsals on them are well on
the way. This is another feature new
to Michigan operas.
An orchestra of 24 pieces under the
direction of Anthony J. Whitmire, of
the School of Music, plays almost con-
- tinually throughout the performance.
- Most of the dialogues have musical
accompaniment. A string sextette,
consisting of a harp, cello, and' four
violins is one of the orchestral fea-
t tures.
Metropolitan And -
Collegiate: Opera

General ChairmanST
SISETS, NEW RECORDB
S ats For "'Tabourine" Sell Rapidly
In Cities Where Sbow Will
Be Presented
PLAY NEW YORK DEC. 29

General Box Office Sale
at Whitney Theater for
TicIets to
TAMBOURINE
Opening Night-Monday., Dec.7

4
I

Eben L. Graves, '26
The general chairman of "Tambour-
ine", who has supervised the work
connected, with the production of an

opera the
offering.

size of the Union's present

CITIES. PLAN RECEPTIONS
FOR MEMBERS OF CAST
Members of the company which will
piesent "Tambourine", have been as-
sured hearty receptions in each of the
cities where they appear. With the
initial incentive of playing to houses
sold out several weeks in advance,
friends and alumni of the University
have planned numerous and varied
social functions for the entertainment
of the Michigan men during their
afternoon Jand evening in each city.
Many cities are planning dances in
honor of the "beautiful ladies" of the
cast and chorus, while others have ar-
ranged dinners and special alumni
lunches for all Michigan men in the
locality on the date of the opera's
visit. A score of privately owned
automobiles have been ma4e available
to the members of the company while
in Philadelphia, and similar cour-
tesies have been extended in other
cities. At Buffalo the whole troupe
will go to Niagara Falls for a few
hours.
For the first time in the history of
the Union opera the student orchestra
accompanying the production will be
completely costumed in gypsy regalia
in harmony with the theme of the
presentation to distinguish the organi-
zation from the unusual theater musi-
cians.

Advance seat sales for "Tambour-
ine" in the cities where it will play on
its road trip that will last from Dec.
18 to Jan. 5 are far greater than ever
before attained by a Michigan show.
Many of the cities are wiring to Ann
Arbor in an effort to arrange special
performances.
In New York, where the opera will
play Dec. 29 at the Metropolitan
Opera house, the entire lower floor of
the gigantic theatre has been sold,
together with the greater portion of
the upper floors. Special permission
has been obtained by the management
to place extra chairs on the lower
floor to accommodate the large num-
ber who wish to see the Michigan pro-
duction.
Although it is impossible to/ched-
ule extra performances in the cities
that are asking for this privilege, the
large sales indicate the enthusiastic
reception that the opera is certain to
receive on its trip.
Thirteen cities with a combined
population of approximately 15,000,000
people will be covered in this year's
trip, which will include Chicago,
Iansing, Grand Rapids, Saginaw,
Flint, Detroit, Buffalo, New York,
Philadelphia, Washington, Cleveland,
Cincinnati and Toledo.
IS MYTH, OPERA 580OWS
Women's feet are no smaller than
men's, according to the findings of
homer Heath, manager of "Tambour-
ine."
Mr. Heath has just purchased 400
pairs of footgear for the cast and
choruses of "Tambourine," entirely
composed of men, and he says he had
no difficulty in getting girls' slippers,
to fit.
"Feminine footgear looks smaller
b.ecause the shoe manufacturers de-
sign them with that aim in mind," he
said. "I had no trouble in obtaining
shoes for the 'girls' in the 'TambouT-
ine' company because, though wom-
en's shoes look daintier, tinier and
more fragile than the masculine
square-toed brogans, the inside di-
mensions are approximately the
sarge."
Mr. Shuter has enlarged both male
and female choruses fn the 20th an-
nual opera, eliminating the more
amateurish pony chorus.

Tasting Is elieving!
Qnce you try Barbecue Sandwiches-you will always come
back for more. Nowhere on or about the campus can you
find a more Tasty and Wholesome Lunch.

J

Across from Literary Building.
We Deliver Anywhere in thle City.

BE CONVINCED!

5, - .:

Annual

r

If a musical show can be collegiatej
and metropolitan at the same time,,
"Tambourine," will he just that, ac-
cording to Homer Heath, manager of
the show.
The two students who produced the
book and lyrics for the forthcoming
production in collaboration are, Walk-
er Everett, '26, of Chicago and Valen-
tine Davies, '27, of New York city. Mil-
ton Peterson, '27L composer of all
t he music for "Tambourine," hails
from Detroit.

CH IS
12% to 4a% reduction
fromt regular prices
Not an offering of a few items,
but our entire stock of
CORRESPONDENCE PAPERS:
Gift boxes, bulk stationery, papeteries of leading
manufacturers in many sizes, shapes and forms. Also
die embossed Michigan, Fraternity and Sorority
papers. v. -

&

THE MANS SHOP
. -E
Conservative apparel
for University men
PDVVMWA~hM1 - VT1AD'

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II
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LL
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Buy UUOKSfor
Christmas
SLATER'

LEATHER GOOF
Loose Leaf Note Bc

)S:

t l ## ' +
$ I

Dressing Cases, Pu
Cases, Bridge Sets,
Writing Cases, Cigar
ers, etc.
NOVELTIES:

11

ooks, Ladies and Gentlemen's
rses, Expense Books, Music
ame Sets, Memory Books,
a dCigarette Cases, Keytain-

'I;

KinneysHow to savemoney byspendingit

We have Silver Slippers
for Formal Wear
$590

Ash Trays, Cigarette and Cigar Humidors, Book
Ends, Brassware, Bridge Scores, Candlesticks, Can-
dles, Tally Cards, Favors, etc.
GREETING CARDS:
For all occasions including our select line of Christmas
Cards.I&A
FOUNTAIN PENS AND PENCILS:
(No Discount)
A liberal allowance will be made on your old fountain
pen on the purchase of a new pen of any of the fol-
lowing makes: Parker, Sheaffer, Conklin, LeBouef,
Wahl, Swan, John Holland.
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE

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Latest Styles in Patents,
Satins and Suedes
for Informal Wear
$4.98

Chiffon Hose, Silk to Top,.......

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1Th4 Yf

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