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October 30, 1925 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-10-30

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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1925

ri-I MICHIGAN DAILY

HALL POINTS OUT SALIENT ASPECTS OF
CO UNTR Y LI°E IN REPUBLIC OF !H

cane, and
with niud, eo
Let bb i individlually.

" In ore
Continuing a discussion on the i rge sire of one gardeni plot is freni ational Sport Is Cockfighting through the
general subject of the Republic of one to tfarce acres. Many crops ore; The national sport is cockighting, pas55Iho
Haiti, R. B. Hall of the geography growvn together in a trop~ical .jumble, I hich was formerly in vogue at all iflces, e(ach h;
br what iin ight hbe culled a "four-story seasons. At present a law prohibit;, RESUIts of tlx
deprtmnt yeteday poite ou ~ricultune~ system." Interm7?ingled on the sport during the planting season, denced inl ti
some of the salient aspects of Haitian -one plot of ground are vines and low- for otherwise, few natives could be Y~lW3 1(
rural life as viewed by him this sum- '1ying 1)roduce plants. Next in height ' found willing to suffer tire discon-' dwellings inE
Amner in geographical research work( comes rice; thenr, higher, corn aild j forts of tropical labor in preference ITIbc religio
there. In the disoso n r Hall sugar cane; and aoealteeaet hspsie oa ah
gave interesting informationo th ltan and ble ates.JlS55 h atan hos ,orcyes, are the French,a
native labor organization, the crops ,Item has a hapnhazard and an inefflcl- tpclytoiatatitace rsn ay
sysem th mrkesth tyesof ntapearnc atfistglance, but it , oofs of palm leaf, grass or sugar; (Cont in'
houses, and the religion of the present probabaly gives the largest yield of -
day H-aitian. food per unit of labor, as well as
"The tom-tom," Mr. Hall declar- furnishing one type of food or other' .111
ed, "is the national musical instru- through nearly the entire year.
mnent of Haiti. It leads the Haitian In lo1t~flce of 11ark~tsW E0 V A 9
characteristic native dances and for T
important economic andl social or-' __________________________
Voodoo ceremonies, and it often ac- 'ganizations in all Haiti. They range'
companies them at their agricultural, in size from the great cathedral miar-
work. This crude drum is made fronm ket at Post an Prince, which several
a hollowed trunk section of the roy- 'tosnsepeated ogteig
al palm,, the most beautiful tree of of not I more than a (dozen people at
the tropics, and is covered with a 'the intersection of two uiountain
hide stretched over the end and hield trails. M ihg n he tr L
in place with wooden pegs. Pr~actically only the wmnatd'l l hga T e tr L
The last mentioned use of the tom- these markets, carrying their goods onOpening Sea sot
torn for agriculture involves a ens-L their heads or 'on small donkeys for.
tom called the "combiet," which isI many miles. The market places are
the practice of working a large group) the centers for all exchange of news, s RITV EET FTH D
of natives together, on one field, to and are utilized in a social way by S PRAIEEETO H R
the rhythm of the tom-tom. The coin-I the native women. The men, as a
blet is carried on either by the ten- general rule, remain at home from
ant farmers on the property of weal-cutmbeasofheattatite The Famous All-Star Company,C
thy natives, by a group of the plant- cfomecngseriofevolu thtin and
anion owner's own relatives; or occa- wfreaonygmanrod eonutheioad FSKCAU EYO(T,
sionally as a purely co-operative en- wbyfthewanyerinfguerida bndse was JAMtFIS E rr POERS, 1)TUS I
terprise, much like the well knownbytewneiggeilbadasJNS1.PWE ,LO SR
"husking bees," of our own remem- likely to be forced into service in one
brance. The man whose property is or another of the revolutionary armies. i (fer ds
being worked usually furnishes food This enforced condition has led to a 14OtrStr
and copious quantities of taf'ia, or na- rather efficient division of labor, the
tive rum, to the company of workers, men attending to agriculture, and the il Richaird Briuisley Slieridaciii
These natives form in a long line, women engaging in crop transporta- Ijimitiortil liiglish Vt'edey
singing and working to the incessant tion and trade. Thle same situation
throb of the tom-tom. The day's work has caused the universal habit of hid-~
often closes with a dance which may ing all houses and gard Qn plots asway
last for as long as several days. from the roads and trails. In some
Coffee is Cief Crop parts of the country it is possible to
The chief money crop of the island ride for miles-without se~eing a single
is coffee, which was planted long ago house, despite the fact tnat dwellings
by the French and since then has been are.,generally within a stcne's throwT H I
allowed to grow wild on' the moun- of the road, hidden behind cactus
tdin sides. This coffee, coining from fences or screens of tropical growth.
a stronger and more aromatic' berry Since the American occupation has j App~eiriflg hUnder tl h Manage menit of G~eorg edV.
than does the Brazilian coffee, which given the natives a feeling of peace $R3S-oe For .00, Balcony, $1
m.akes up most of the American im- and security, large tracts of lar~d are (PIE-oe lg
port trade, enters world trade as St. being cleared and opened up down to,
M~larc coffee, and is- practically all the very trails.ma
exported to France, where it coix- °-__________________
mands a high price. In 1791, the cof- e ______ --____--__
fe'e crop brought a price of more
than $10,000,000. Now the annual
crop is valued at more than $7,000,-
,Cotton is the second largest money e
crop, and other products of export
trade value are dyewoods, cacao, sug-1
ar pres nall sllsale dst re,
, presntand goatl sainThsetreA,..- c ia
except for one large sugar corpoi'a-
tion which has developed in recent AT
years. Fxperimental plantations have
been recently established in tobacco,

latticed -walls plastered
ordinarily of one or two
ril dIwellings are cluster-,
11l groups oir are found
eying north and south
eisland, the traveller!
gh a series of soil prov-
raying a distinctive color.
his local coloring are evi-
liV brilliant: reds, violets,,
whites of the miud-walled
(each district. .
.n of Haiti is nominally I
[olio, an inheritance from
an s l s~r d u o teby French priests. The
sed on Page Eight)

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30

egue

Comp rising
DMA S A. IVISE
ROB B

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a's

Tyler and IIIu1I !'ord

_,
4
.-

11

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w !
;gR,, gy. , emelR+RSbir.M'i' R1i
1
1f{I
1
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pieapple,, cotton, cacao,, rubber, and
sial growing.
At least 85 per cent of the popula-
f ern of Hlaiti is entirely dependant
upon farming, which ' is carried on,
-withl hardly any other' tool than the
p n tive machete. Ordinarily, the aver-

DETROIT THEATRES
THIS WEEK

1

Bonstelle PNighse ts 75cto S$t .
B rayn ues Thnrs.St
Woodward at Eliot Tel. Glendale 9792
The DONSTELLE CO.
In the Rollcking, Nove!. Satiric Comedy
"The Belgar on Horseback
CR ® Eves. - 50c to $2.50
ARR Wed. Mat. 50c to $1.50
PKSat. Mat. 50c to $2,40
26th 819 Week
ABIEAS IRISH ROSE
LAST' WEEK(S
Ioon 4 Lafayette at Shelby
aehuert a aytle Nights, 5oc to $3
Bargain Mat.,
Thursday, best seats, $2., Sat. Mat., Sac to $2,50
Tlel. Cadilllac, 8705
The STUDENT PRINCE
Every Play.('oer Should See It!
Every Music-Lover Will Hear It!
M ale Chorus of Go Girl Chorus of 35
Under New
Management
Our lgt-
(Jaily :and41Service
at Lowest Prices
C,,]oll SUEY 1'ANDI)
AMlCAN 1)INNER
Served at All Hours
SPIECIAL JDINNERS.
11:30 a.m."2 P.M. & 5:30-8 p.ma.
Varsity inn
4i12' East William,

-NO PAYING-
SPECIAL
AVY-FRESHMA
- S~l? RD4XMORNF
..A...........
....All........
............ l..
= ,'& -olicy-
ti Daie
)gal ref0
t4 It' c
f AllSI''enin g -f
.s ":.:::.:";:-::::::>: ,:. % O.S:1e 10c-
mop . S
...gsi~srvt
.Ae
OverPurecby
ySpecial... r gemeiinee
-~~~~JV 35c, 50CT ' NC P
LLOD1E IFOR I ;T NE IN
I-.
AND _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
ADDITION
-Coming-GLORIA SWANSON in "THE COAST OF' FO'LL__.Y"
_____________ I :11111111111111191111911161, 1199E 119911d99999919 969191 1116 1i919911 :'r

i r
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"He's my husband* But-
(Sheo co~ided in the clerk)

"His birthday's: tomorrow, and I want to get
him a. box of really fine cigars. Cigars that
don't smell bitter--or litter. the house with
ashes. ,He's my husband- -but-sometimes
I wonder. if he's, really smart about cigars.",
And then she took home Blackstones.
Birthday givers: here's something to re-
member. The smoke of every Blackstone is'
extremely mild and' fragrant - tobaccos se-
lected for their mildness. And Blackstones
are always free drawing. Al1ways even burn-
ing. Always, holding, their wrapper and ash.
There are bigger cigars, if s ze is. what you
seek. But at Blackstone prices it is impossible
to make a larger cigar of such choice. tobaccos.
Blackstone was a; fine cigar52 years. ago. It ,
was, even finer: 10 years ago. It is at its very
best-:-today!

Finest tobacco
crop in years
-in your .

iftiw . . - - - - ---

BlIac WITT F Oe
CI GA iF

SIhER C&OCaWEV' ~9
IDistrl i)tors.
ANN ARBOR, 141C11-

Read The Daily " Classifed"~

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it 6.;

A.T

THE

THE HIGHEST SALARIED SINGLE IN KEITH VAUDEVILLE

and

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