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October 08, 1925 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN -DAILY

THURSDAV: OCTORM R 1925*

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VICTORY

VETERAN TWIRLER
ALLUIS PIRATES
ONLY FIVE HITS

JOE HARRIS SCORES FIRST
'WIThH OME RUCN N
$ECONI)

RUN

STRIKES OUT TEN
Traynor Leads lirate Attack With
Two Hits; Morrison Relieves
Lee 3Meadows

PITTSBURGH, Pa., Oct. 7.-Walter
Johnson, allowed the Pirates only five
hits here today and gave the world
champion Washington Senators first
blood in the 1925 world series, the
Harris clan winning 4-. The vet-
eran twirler fanned ten batters.
The Senators took an early lead in
the second inning when Joe Harris,
substitute outfielder, hit one of Pitch-
er Lee' Meadow's slants in to the right
field bleachers for a home run. The
ball bounced back and Harris stopped
at second, but the umpire waved him1
around. It was a clean homer and
the first.hit of the game.
Thi big inning' for the American.
League-ten was the fifth.. Joe Har-
ris opened with a single to deep short,
his second hit. Bluege, instead of sac-
rificing, crossed up the Pirate infield
and swung on the ball, singling to
left, Joe Harris going to second.
Peck singled, filling the bases, with
no one out. After the three hits the
Pirates started to warm up Morrison.
Ruel and Johnson, however, were
struck out by Meadows. The Sena-
tors were not to be denied, and with
the intensity at white heat and the
crowd frantic, Rice singled to center,
IHarris and Bluege scoring.
Meadows was steady, outside of a
bad inning in the fifth. lie struck
out four men, there being fifteen.
strikeouts in all, a rather unusual
thing in a World series game. Mor-
rison, who relieved Meadows in the
ninth, hA one to his credit."
The Pirates got their lone marker
in the :fifth' by virtue of Traynor's
home run over the right field fence.
He also singled in the second, giving
him two of the Pirate's, five hits.
In addition Traynor gave proof that.
his reputation of being baseball's
greatest third baseman is well found-'
ed when he made a diving catch of
Ruel's line smash over third base. It
was the best fielding play of the game,
the ball being only a few inches off

Present World's
Series Third F or
Pittsburgh team
(Wy Associated Press)
PITTSBURGH, Oct. 7.-P1ittsburghs
participation in the present World's
series marks the third time that the
] Pirates have fought in the big classic,
* although the Smoky City team has
captured five-league pennants.
Back in 1901, 1902, and 1903, the
"ir ates then under the management
of Fred Clarke-who has come back
to help in this year's triumph-dom-
inated the senior circuit but it wasn't
until the last year of this reign that
the World's series idea took root.
In that year, the Pirates met defeat
in the first championship struggle at
the hands of the Boston Red Sox, los-
ing five out of eight games.
Six years later, in 1909, still under,
Clark's leadership, the Pirates swept
to the top once more and for the last
time prior to this season. They bat-
tled that year against Hughey Jen-
nings' Detroit Tigers for the premier
title and won out after a nip and
tuck fight that went the limit of sev-
en games before being decided.
The Pirates and Tigers won on al-
ternate days in that series and Babe
Adams, the only playing survivor
still in Pirate uniform,.-was the hero
'of the National leaguers' triumph. Hj.c
was credited with three of the four
Pirate victories.
That serkies,incidentally, was one
of three which have gone the limit
of prescribed games, which at various
tines has been fixed at seven and
nine contests.
DDINS SENTHEN
FRESHMN HAR~IER TERM

GRID TEAM HOLDS
FIRST SCRIMAGE
I 'Part of Regulars Oppose Freshmen
While Other Squad Has
Signal ))rill
HOOSIERS LACK VETS
Another long fundamentals drill,
followed by an hour's scrimmage for
part of the squad, while an eleven un-
der the generalship of Friedman han
through signals, formed the after-
noon's work for Coach Yost's grid-
'ders.
In the fundamentals drill Coaches
Yost and Kipke worked with the pun-
ters and ends while Coaches Wieman
and Blott drilled the linemen in line
ulharging.
The regulars lined up with Grube
and H. Webber at the ends. Edwards
ind Oade at tackles and Dewey and
Ilawkins at guards. Thisted was in
'the pivot position. In the backfield,
Vucklewartz called signals with Bab-
Wock and Gilbert at the halves and
'. Weber at full. The freshmen fur-
nished the opposition. The team which
xran through practice was composed of
Friedman at quarter, Gregoy and
Fuller playing the halves, and Molen-
'da at full.
On the line, Herrnstein and Flora
were on the ends with Stamimaii,
Grube, and Coach Cappon at the tack-
les, while Baer and Grinnell played
the guard positions. Captain Brown
worked out a while at center but was
later taken out and Shoenfeldt substi-
tuted. Coach Cappon directed the
tearn from the tackle berth after
Grube was sent into the scrimmage.
Gilbert, Babcock, and. Grube all
showed to advantage in the fracas
With the freshmen, while Pucklewartz
directed the attack in a creditable
manner.
Indiana, which is the first Confer-
ence team that the Varsity will meet,
boasts but few veterans and Coach
"Bill" Ingram will probably pick his
eleven from a, host of green material..
Winston, Jones, and Shattuck are"
prominent end candidates, while the
Fisher brothers will take care of the
tackle berths. They are the heavy-
weights of the Hoosier line, George
tipping the scales at 195 pounds while
Walter totals 212. Ilobbick Bernoske,
and Childs, all veterans, are fighting
it out for the guard positions, with
Kelse, 156 pound lad, holding down
the pivot job.
Salmi will direct the team from the
quarterback p ition while Marks,
Prucho, and Ifyers are sure to see
service at the halves. The fullback1
berth still remains a problem and onel
of the halves may be changed to

One of the interesting sidelights on
last Saturday's game with Michigan
State was the large number of sopho-
mores that were sent into the con-
test. I
In 1922, only five second year men
were used in the opening game with
Case, 'although Steger and Keefer
went in early in the first half. The
Case game of -1923 saw this list in-
crease to seven, one of whom, Haw-
kins, started the game at guard.
Last year Michigan beat Miami 55-01
in the opener, and 13 sophomores got
their first taste of college football.
Stamman started the game at right
half, Lovette, Keller, Samson, Lang-
guth, Coventry, McIntyre, Ullman,
Flora, Davis, Gregory, Madsen, and
Damhoff going in later.
Last Saturday 11 men began their
careers against M. S. C. Three of
this 11, Thisted at center, Fuller at
half, and Molenda at full started the
game, an unusual number. Ooster2'
bann, while not starting, played the
greater part of the time. Oade, Grin-
nell, S. Babcock, Gilbert, Nickerson,
Palmaroli, and Miller were the oth-
ers to see action.
ARRNGE TWO MATCHS
FOR VARSITY FENCERS
With more than 25 candidates re-
porting for the squad, Michigan's fenc-
ing team gives promise of eclipsing
the work of former teams. C. L. Pt-
tibone, '28, was elected captain of the
squad.
Included in the list of candidatesi
are four veterans besides Captain
Pettibone, the men being Eddy, Neu-
gass, Ireland and Kellar.
Two meets have already been ar-
perhaps for the last time, as there is
ed with the Michigan State college
fencers and the other with Ohio State.
Negotiations are now under way to ar-
range contests with Illinois, Purdue
and Chicago.
Freshmen are eligible for this sport,
perhaps for the last time, as there is
a possibility that fencing will become
a recognized sport next year. Fresh-
men will also be given credit in their
regular gymnasium work. Practice is
held at 4 o'clock every Monday, Wed-
nesday and Friday at Waterman gym-
nasium.
* William Fleckstein, guard on the
"1owa football teams of 1923 and 1924,
who was prominently mentioned for
an all-Conference berth, has turned to
professional football and is playing
guard on the Chicago Bear's team of
the National Professional Football
league.

L ,I ir w w * v93
Squad to iTeet Detroit Country Club
Saturday in Initial Coin-
petition
jHASTING$ TO MEET VYSE
Next Sunday Hastings and Vyse, the
two finalists in- the annual fall golf
tournament, will be seen in action in
a 36 hole match over the Ann Arbor
Country club course. -Hastings of the
Varsity team hondily defeated New-
man 9 and 7 in the semi-finals. Vyse,
a sophomore, had little trouble in
defeating Feely, another member of
last year's Varsity.
The match between these two con-
testants should prove interesting and
close as well. Both of these men have
vanquished their opponents through-!
out the tournament and at the same
time have been turning in consistent1
scores around 73.
The Detroit Country club golf team
will meet the Michigan team over the
Barton Hills course at 10 o'clock Sat-
urday morning. Detroit will be rep-
resented by a number of stars, in-
cluding James Standish, former state
and district champion. Besides
Standish, the Detroit team will have
among its ranks such men as Bic-
den, Lee ,and Waldo, all of the three
being well known in state golf cir-
cles.
Each team will consist of six play-
ers. The Michigan team is to be
made up of those men qualifying in
the campus tournament as well as the
following: Feely, Glover, Hastings,
Cole, Quirk, Vyse, Connor, Goodspeed,
Werner, Berglin and Krave.
All men whose names appear on
this list are requested to play today
and tomorrow, so as to be at the
top of their game. If any men are
unable to do so they should commun-
icate with the captain of the golf f
team.
Donald J. Ross, New York golf
architect who laid out tEhe Barton
Hills course, visited Ann Arbor Mon-
day and inspected the course at the
invitation of the board of directors
and the greens committee. Several
changes have been made in the course
since Mr. Ross' last visit here but he
pronounced the lay-out fundamental-
ly _correct.
PITTSBURGH, Oct. 7.-A plan to ad-
vance the starting time of World ser-
ies games from 2 to 1:30 o'clock was
favorably discussed last night at a
meeting of major league club owners
with Coin. K. M. Landis.
Idttle investment-big returns, The
Daily Classifieds.-Adv.

M"anySpme P0 [ lAT
See Sevice 'In OUL ETiIJfIui
Opening Contest; TO MEET SUNfl

i

ER ANIE S'IC'KI TO PLAY 1I10I(
Ernie Vick, former MichiganX
jA11-Ameiclan center, has signiedI
up with the Detroit Panthers. Following is the schedule for the
Vick is in perfect condition and j second round matches in the all-cam-
after two (lays study mastered pus tennis tournament. These games
the Panther's signals. He will I must be played and reported to the
be seen in action Sunday when Intramural office Monday October 12.
t~he Detroit aggregation meets J First round matches must be reported
the Phuladelphia Yellowjackets today.
at Navin field. Singles: Finkleman 9022 vs S. Was-
(Continued from Page Six)
Aiik Cr (s WiiLtnnrt~ hr lot iof x in Well
SP ECIA L TODAY ONLY
We are closing out on our Topcoats.
Values $30, $35 and $40
at $19.75
Our suits are tailored exclusively for the college man.
See our Campus Model three-button straight coat, trou-
sers 20-inch bottom. Remember we are tailors. This
assures you of first class clothes. Our clothes are hand-
built and the shape stays long after other clothes are
in discard.
Two PantSults, $35-$45
IRI
213 East Liberty St. - Oposite Varsity

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the ground.
Box score:
'Wasiinglon Seiiators

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S.
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Ju
J.
B
Pe
Jo

ice, cf........... 4 0 2.
.Harris, 2b....... 3 0 0
oslin, if. ..4.....4 1 1
udge, lb .......... 3 0 0
Harris, rf ...:.. 4 2 2
luege, 3b ... ,,.....4 1 2.
eckinpaugh, ss .. 4 0 1
,uel, c...........30 0
ohnson, p........3. 0 0.
Totals........32 4 8.
sVittsburg'it' frat es
AB RH1-
bore, 2b.........4 0 0
arcy, cf.......... 2 0 0
uyler, rf......... 4 0 1
iwnhart, if.......4 0 1
raynor, 3b.......4 1 2
right, ss......... 4 0 0
rantham, lb....... 3 0 0
mith,c+...........3 0 1
ooch, c...........0 0 0
eadows, p... ...... 1 0 01
orrison, p ........0 0 0
igbee. ..4.... 0 0 0
clnnis...........1 0 0

PO.
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With the addition of five new men
to the squad, prospects for an excep-
tionally strong freshman cross coun-
try team were strengthened consider-
ably.
For the first time this season the
squad ran the full distance over the
2 7-10 mile course last Saturday, and
appeared to be even stronger than'
first indications showed.
Monroe, star distance runner on
the Michigan State freshman team of
last year, has proven true to form
and is steadily growing better. To
cope with him Getz, Watson and La-
mont, newcomers, have shown up
well.
The trio from Ann Arbor high
school, consisting of Aubrey, Perrine,
and Wturfel, have also impressed
Coach Furnass.
A new squad of harriers will start
Thursday and any new men' who are
interested are urged to try out. Up-
perclass men who wish to take ad-
vantage of the training can also work
out with the freshman team.
Contrary to what was stated pre-
viously, numeral sweaters will be
given to the first six men to finish in
the final race of the year. The' first
three will receive cups in addition to
this.
As yet no definite date has been
set for this run but it will probably I
be held about the middle of Novem-
ber.

FI

"S1)e Is of Paramount Irportance."

full.
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MEN ONE 0 0 0 Mm

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Regulation GYM SUPPLIES

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WE HAVE EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR GYM
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NEW YORK, Oct. 7.-Three pitchers
signed contracts with the l1roohlyn
Nationals for the 1926 playing season
before leaving for their homes, the
club announced yesterday. The trio
were E. P. (Tiny) Osborne, W. C.
Sherhardt and Guy Cantrell.

l

711 N. University Ave.

U

Next to Arcade Theatre

v

'*ISPENamEUE®E.....m m

Total . .....30
Score by innings:
Washington 0:
Pittsburgh O

1 5

10 020 001-4
)0O 010 000-1

ERMN TENNIS PLYRS
ELIGIBLE O ME 1S
NEW YORK, Oct. 7.-Restoration of
tennis relations between the United
States and Germany was announced
yesterday by -the executive committee
of the United States Lawn Tennis
association.
Under a ruling just promulgated by
the association, German players are
restored to eligibility in Amican
tournaments, except the i ation
championships for the first time since
the war, while American players, may
again participate in German net com-

The NE CK WEAR that Serves the Wearer

Now,-as in
to Michigan

We invite your inspection-of our line of Fall Suits.

The

the past, Tom Corbett's Collegiate Shop offers
men the very latest styles in suits and furnishings.

trousers are full and either a three button sack or'double

breasted coat is appropriate.

Prices $40, $45, $50.

i

If you are in need of a winter overcoat we can fit you out

correctly.

A large selection offered for your choice.

'V

The new Scotspuns and Basket weaves have just

arrived.

We specialize in R si io because
Qf its wearing qualities.

"Dress Well and Succeed."

~/

Ta fnht'

I

Is

in

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