100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 22, 1925 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGThJ FotliR

THEW MICIGIAN DAIL Y

ai.._ iY111 i1 11V.rll 1 LL-1.1L 1

RID~AY, MAY 22; 1121i'

i

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Members of Western Conference Editorial
Association..
The Ataociated Press is exclusively en-
titled to the use for republicatiora of all news
dispatches credited to it or not etherwse
credited in this paper and the local news pub-
fished therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Anin Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier. $3.So by mail,
$4.00.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
nard Street.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
PHILIP M. WAGNER
Editor... ..........John G. GarlIighouse
News Editor......... Robert G. Ramsay
City Editor..........Manning Hosaeworth
Night Editors
George W. Davis Harold A. Moore
Thomas P. Henry Fredk. K. Sparrow, Jr.
Kenneth (.. Keller Norman R. Thai
Edwin C. Mack
Sports Editor........William H.! Stoneman
Sunday Editor.....:...Robert S. Mansfield
Women's Editor.............Verena Moran
Telegraph !editor...William' J. Walthour
Assistants
Gertrude Bailey Marion Meyer
Louise Barley Helen Morrow
Marion Barlow Carl E. Ohlmacher
Leslie S. Bennetts Irwin A. Olian
Smith H. Cady, Jr. W. Calvin Patterson
Stanley C. Crighton Margaret Parker
Willard B. Crosby Stanford N. Phelps
Valentine L. Davies Helen S. Ramsay
Robert T. DeVore Marie Reed
Marguerite Dutton L. Noble Robinson
Paul A. Elliott Simon F. Rosenbaum
Geneva Ewing Ruth Rosenthal
James W. Fernamberg Frederick H. Shillito
Katherine Fitek~ Wilton A. Simpson
Joseph O. Gattner Janet Sinclair
Leonard Hall 'David C. Vokes
Elizabeth S., Kennedy Lilias K. Wagner
Thomas V. Koykka Marion Walker
Mariod Kubik Chandler Whipple
Elizabeth' Lielbermann
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
WM. D. ROESSER
Advertising....................E. L. Dunne
Advertising.....................R. C. Winter
Advertising.. ........... H. A. Marks
Advertising............. .....B. W.Parker
Accounts....................H. M. Rockwell
Circulation....................John Conlin
Publication....................R. D. Martin
Assistants
P. W. Arnold K. F. Mast
W. F. Ardussi F. E. Mosher
I. M. A -ving H. L. Newmann
W. C. Bauer T. D. Olmstead
lrving Berman R. M. Prentiss
Rudolph Bostelman W. C. Pusclb
George P. Bugbee F. Rauner
B. CaplanJ.. Ryan
H. F. Clark M. E. Sandbeig
C. Consroe F. K. Schoenfeld
R. . Dentz R. A. Sorge
George C. Johnson A. S. Simons
0. A. JoseJr. M. M. Smith
K. K. Klein I. J. Wineman
W. L. Mullins
FRIDAY, MAY 22, 1925,
Night Editor-ROBERT T. DE VORE

J

the sessions of that convention, Gov-
ernor C. C. Moore of Idaho offered a
home in his state for every homeless
and destitute child in the country.
In making this unexpected offer,
Governor Moore said, "I would like
to have Idaho become a clearing
house for homeless children of the
congested East. Nothing would please
me more than to have not only chil-
dren from institutions but fromi
homes where the parents, because of
poverty, are contemplating sending
the children to institutions."
The aim of the delegates to the con-'
vention is to make it possible for'
every child in America to have a
home. The greatest good that can be!
accomplished by any organization of
this sort will be in providing the
thousands of poor city children with
the proper home environment. There
is nothing that can take the place of
a home in the development of the
child 'life. Moreover, the success of
tomorrow depends upon the properf
growth and training of the children
of today.
If Governor Moore can and will
make good his promise to convert
Idaho into a home for destitute chil-
dren, the least that the people of the
country can do is to see that the
needy children are given the oppor-,
tunity to take advantage of such a
home.
THE BOYS COME TO COLLEGE

i

I DROLLS
NOTN
MR. JASON
COWLES

-- ---- i

AND
DRAMA
II ________________________ _________________________________________________

i

--- i

Seniors! Order your
Personal Cards Now

I OUT
FOR
LUNCH
It is wonderful to note how much
advertisements aid in the education
of children. Only the other day littlel
Mary, age eight, came running to her
mother from the yard. Very much
out of breath she cried, "Oh mother,
I found the cutest little black and
white cat to play with in the yard
but she had such dreadful halitosis."
* * *.
"One woman suffered fractures of
both legs when trampled in a terror
stricken rush for women and emerg-
ency exits."-Michigan Daily.
At least some of these New Yorkers
are calm at all times.
. 4 eR
ONE ACT PLAY
Scene: The card room.
Characters: Four players.j
Time: Past.
Dealer (after dealing cards)--Pass.
Second player-One Spade.
Third player-Double
Fourth player-Pass.
Dealer-Pass.
BANG and then a softer thud as a

1THIS AFTERNOON: 'ThUe third May
Festival concert in hilllauditoriUm at
j 2:30 o'clock.
TONII': The fourth play Festi-
val concert in ill auditoriui at 8
o'clock-.
''II. SEtOND) AY FESTIVAL
A review by Robert Henderson.
It is a strange thing, perfectly
obvious, wholly indlescribab~le. Every-
one recognizes it, yet no one can rea-
son its being. You have all occasion-
ally heard performances as the first
May Festival concert; concerts that
are gripping and colossal, of the gods,
with artists like Mlary Garden, Claire
I)ux, Chaliapin, Gabrilowitsch that
simply sweep an audience away with
their dramatic fervor, all the grandilo-
quence of the irresistable virtuoso.
And you have all heard concerts as
the one last evening: scholarly re-
citals, dull with reservations, the
madding, depressing spectacle of ac-
curacy and precision. One cannotI
criticize them, for they are worthy'
and painstaking; yet nontheless, the
final impression of flat competency
stands and stands.f
Every new concert re-states this
j theory of the dramatic. In one class
I.amm""-- e,

_ ,.. _ ... . s i.s..

GRAHAM'S
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WA LK

MANN'S e ts '
Straws and Panamas
at Reasonable Prices
We Also do
high Class Work In
ClEANING AND REBLOCKING
Panama Hats
Regular Factory Work
No Acids Used
FACTORY NATrSTORE
617 Packard St. Phone 7415
(Where D. U. R. Stops at State)
SLEEP ANY WHERE BUT,
EAT AT REX'S
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 Arbor Street
Near State and Packard Sts.

OPENING DANCE
AT
The "Blue Lantern" r
ISLAND LAKE
Saturday, May 23,1925
Jean Goldkette's
"Breez owers"
Dancing 8:30
3

I

This year's interscholastic track fleshy body hits the floor.
meet makes the twenty-fifth one to be Curtain.
held by the University. More than * * *
ever before this event carries sig- HAVE YOU PAID YOURSI
nificance, because of the increase in I'm sorry now that I paid my fifty
the number of high school students dollars because I am missing all
interested in college activities. Fur- kinds of publicity in the Union lobby.
thermore, it is these same "school- . Oh Hank
boys" who, with a belief in higher P.S. I really didn't, I just said it
learning, comprise university enroll- for a joke. * * *
ments. Hank tell us that he is somewhat
When hundreds of students make worried on receipt of the following
such a visit, they are directly help.ing letter:
the university and the high school to "Dear Hank,
form a closer and more vital bond. The other afternoon, a maid told
Those high school students who are a whole bunch of us our fortunes.
undecided about attending college are Such excitement? If she told me the
influenced to consider further educa- truth, the Lord pity you. I'm so
tion, and those who have made up jealous? She said that I liked a dark
their minds have their decision haired boy who wasn't in Chicago.
strengthened. She said I thought of him almost all
In the interests of education, rather the time, but he wasn't worth it, for
than from selfish motives, we should when I wasn't there, he took out a
extend these visitors a hearty wel- blond, about whom, however he
come, wasn't very crazy. Hank, for good-
ness sake are you keeping all kinds

V
1
.
t
t
r
7
4
l

CKNights - - - 5Cc to $2.50
GA RRI Wed. Mat. - 50c to $1.50
Sat. Mat.- - 50c to $2.00
The Miracle Play of America
ANNE NICHnLS'
"Abie's Irish Rose"
SEATS NOW FOR THIS AND NEXT WEEK

I

VICTOR SINGLE FACED
RED SEAL RECORDS

' Y i,
,r..

Plants for your room,
fresh cut flowers for

and
all

OCCaSIOnS are as near to you
as your phone.
Call
Cousins & Hat].
611 E. University
Phone 7313
Your Order Will Receive
Prompt and Courteous
Attention.

Original Price
$1.25
1.50
1.75
2.00
2.50
3.00
3.50

Now
65c
80c
90c
1.30
1.60
1.60

i $T

Endl Suhytokes 1Iligar'

Pronouncement that MacMillan ex-
pects to accomplish nine mtonths'
work in the Polar region in three
days by means of airplanes was pub-
lished in yesterday's journals when
the crime Flews gave out.

YOUNG BUT CSPBLE .
Glenn, Frank, thirty-eight year old
editor of the Century magazine, who
delivered the Commencement address
here last June, has accepted the posi-
tion of president of the University of
Wisconsin, and may thus add to his
list of achievements that of being the
nation's youngest university presi-
dent.
There are doubtless many who
think that Wisconsin has made a
great mistake in selecting a man who
is, comparatively, so young. Prob-
ably the majority of the larger uni-
versities would not even consider
such a man. Yet, despite the fact that
years add experience and stability,
there seems to be no definite reason
why a man of such marked accomp-
lishments as Mr. Frank should not be
a college president, regardless of the
fact that he is only thirty-eight years
of age.
Mr. Frank has had experiences in
the world of letters and sciences far
beyond his years. He served as as-
sistant to the president of Northwest-
ern university -for four years, spent
three years in research and organiza-
tion work with Edward E. Filene, and
has been associated with the Century
magazine for six years, the last four
as editor in chief. In addition, he has
been a lecturer in the United States
and Canada since 1912, and was a
member of the group headed by Chief
Justice Taft which formulated a
draft of the League of Nations
covenant which was considered by the
peace conference at Paris in 1918.
Mr. Frank is young in years, in
ambition, and in energy, but -old in
practical experience. He combines
all of the qualities of a leader, espe-
cially the leader of a progressive edu-
cational' institution. Wisconsin is to
be commended for her courage in
breaking the old bounds of tradition
and selecting a president on his act-
ual capabilities.
IDAHO FOR THE CHILDREN.
In spite of the nation-wide rejec-
tion of the Child Labor Amendment,
there are still many people in the
United States who believe that there
is much. to be done for the welfare of
the children of the country. The
natural tendency in the midst of. the
present-day rush of American life is
to neglect the home life, to nny littleI

i
a'
-
.
sj
E
_
)
)
r
,i

CAMPUS OPINION
Anonymous communications will be
disregarded. The names of comnnunt-
cants will, however, he regarded as
confidential uion request.
IN SUPPORT OF THE UNION
To the Editor:
In Wednesday's Daily there ap-
peared an opinion contributed by A.
L. B., a junior, who in a very nar-
row fashion showed why he did not
want to pay his Union debt. He is1
the kind who would give such an ex

of terrible things from me?
? you have the srtist racked and tortur-
Isle of you, ed by the passion of his vision ; in the
Bee" other, the art isan t ruggling with the
Oh Hank don't worry about that (Inathematics of his task. It is ridic-
fortune teller. She didn't even men- ulous and cruel, and indlisjpensable,
tion, the red head and the brunette. this tyranny of an inspiration . . .
A VERSE TO WOMAN And "The Bells" of Rachmaninoff-
What I 'like abut you. Mr. Stock has literally lived and
It's not your eyes, though they are'lbreathed this woit for over a.year,
gdigging into its every potentiality.
As ga t uVery simply, he stands as a great mu-
As stars upon a summer night.
It's not your lips, though they are sical figure, with a technical knowl-
edge fairly staggering, an appercep-
tion into the upper depths of every
As hues upon a poppy spread. great masterpie,'e. Ire places himl-
It's not your hair, though it is gold slef in front of his orchtestra, his face
As molten metal in the mold. taut, cheeks distended, eyes glaring,
It's none of these ephemeral things, working his men into a very frenzy
That to me the greatest pleasure of attention.
brings. In this vein he brought to Rach-
But do not therefore think I flout you, maninoff's symphony every final aid
that sharp dynamies and fiery clarity
It's just my arms I like about you. E t the nieee

SCHAEBERLE & SON
MUSIC HOUSE

I-I--

r....rr..,u..n.

m

'A
:4jJ

I10 SOUTH MAIN

I * * *
cuse or such excuses as are now often stood as a vast much ado about
posted on the bulletin board at the DIALOGUE nothing. Technically, I am not sure:
Union. He talks like the man who Mike-Let's get a drink. possibly the work contains recurrent
refused to fulfill his pledge because Morey-I haven't any money. moments of power and distinction. In
the barber would not cut his hair free Mike-Wait a minute, Ill be right out. the harmony the composer is even
of charge. * * * more classical than his usual wont,
n ha The professors down at the Mich- but rarely touching the god-given
In a way, however, A. L. B. is right (gan State College of Agriculture in- beauty of his certain preludes: in the
about conditions. During my rform us that there are 163 kinds of first section, in The Silver Bells, with
here (this is my first) I have been dirt in Michigan. During a political its easy, tinkling flow, he is most suc-
far from impressed with conditions at cessful. But The Golden Bells grow
the Union. Instead of being what it campaign it seems that all these sacrine The Brazen Bells give one a
claims, a home for Michigan men, it varieties are used. head-ache, The Mournful Bells turn
has degenerated into a veritable hotel * * gloomy and reach a forte finale . .
haeeeae clubs andaladhe' I Jeb-Wake up. More than this, however, Rach-
swing cresange hl nd sads Nick-I can't. maninoff's transcription of Poe's
conventions. It is run on the princi- Jeb-Why not? genius does not even begin to suggest
pieost soap and uchn thandrs - Nick-I ain't asleep. the neurotic atmosphere surrounding
pe of soft soap and muchhandshak- Ni.* * * the poem. There is a plethora of
ing. The only place where one can FABLE diminished sevenths cromatics to dis-
get away from commercialism in the Once upon a time there was a lute traction, bells, gongs and horns; but
building is atop the tower, and the neither weirdness nor phantasy. Of all
h d freshman. One night he went to bed the poets in literature, save the
ascent to that place is exceedingly early and in the middle of the night French decadents, none demands
dIsagreeithg. Lhe was awakened by some rude more modern treatment, more of the
I agree with A. L. B. in the matter Ifraters who told him to get up and C extravagances and grotesqueries of
of check cashing and the apparent get dressed. They then sent him out the extreme left wing. Think, if you
suspicion which attaches itself to a with no money in his pockets and will, into what Stravinsky would per-
person making a request of the kind. told him to mark all the trees on the vert these verses!
If the Union is to be commercialized imu t makall the tres on
as it is at present, the Union should campus with chalk. He was an Of the selections from the Bach
treat the users ' of the building as obedient freshman and went but he "B minor Mass" there is little to say.1
had no chalk. What no chalk? So It is, of course a divine rhapsody,
customers. And swimmers should othe little freshman went to some res- pregnant with all the vivid, plangent,
be forced to show their cards, or, taurant on Main street and he asked soft-as-water fervor of religious
while all men are members of the or- a big fat man there if he had any ecstacy. Its harmony is a wonder of
n , still not all have register- chalk and to and behlod he had. He architectual beauty, filled with all the
ed with the recording secretary and then went forth and put upon each delerium of emotional fanaticism. It
carry cards. I little tree his mark of approval. Stag- is epic and lyric, o fan heroic mould.
However, while granting that all .l. . But it also is very dull when
these things be true, still the matters gt robbed of its necessary dynamics, the
mentioned should not prevent a man inspired by his friend Joyce Kilmer crescendos of a luxurious imagina-
from fulfilling what he has pledged who wrote: tion. Any piece, obviously-but espe-
' Poems are made by fools like me, cially Bach-;must become impossible
But only God can make a tree." if keyed on a single mezzo forte; and
that the Union has an immense debt And the freshman wrote: not once did the interpretation last
to pay and that the only way the ad- o "God all powerful, does no wrong. evening swerve from this single
ministration can meet the bill is by Although He holds no college de- inonotony.
collecting what has been promised. grees Two of the violinists, in fact, quiet-
The Michigan Union is a campus or- He never errs. So I see not, Ily feel asleep . . . .
2'anniztion no matter m ,3. ...**

;
t
I
;
i
i
i
I
i
i
I

How About
That Summer
Job?
WE ARE PAYING A
G(0OD SALARY TO STU-
DENTS WHO WANVT
WORK.
The Northridge
Co,
331 Nickels Arcade
Office Hours, 9.12, 1.5, 7.9
Every Day

m

i-
FO1% YOUNG MEN
MA OE B Y EUDER1 EI M E R ST E IN C OM PA N E
its n Investment -
- Yo make an nvestme nt
evr ieyubuyin a suit- ha h
it antinvesten inu good s'4-
appearance..
r w
-.. -
iif i
vestmens e shoud en r
w buigasi. Setawh
Weofrri or lths2
ats an inetmntinestmnt.
$35n s. S40 hat $45
sut otrbue t yu go
appearnce.
I- Sw

i
v
i
t
i
1

i
4

"
t
_ \
i ' \ ;y
,,'';,
.. '°
_ t
--- ,

Gyl

N the office of the
particular employer
our graduates always
command attention on
account of their accu-
racy and speed. Take

°.^

i

I,

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan