100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 12, 1925 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


DEDICATED
TO
JUSTICE

C, r

Mfr ian

Iaitj

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXV. No. 164

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 1925

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

VON HINDENBURS'
ARRIVAL IN BERLIN
HAILED WITH JOY
VERM3A'N FIELD) MARISHAL TO lRE
INIIUcTED INTO OFFICE AT
NOON TODAY
SEEKS SECLUSION
Manifestatliens of Pre-Wair Sentiment
Greets President-elect Along
Ciy Streets
Berlin, May 11. (By A. P.)-Speed-
ing through a five lane flanked by
dense rows of surging, jubilant hu-
manity, Field Marshall Paul Von Hin-
denburg, president-elect of Germany,
late this afternoon reached the chan-
cellor's palace where he will be a
guest for a single night pending his
formal induction into office at noon
tomorrow.
An eventful train ride of four hours
carried the presidential party to the
edge of Berlin shortly before 6
o'clock this evening and in less than
ten minutes Germany's new soldier-
president who craves seclusion and
balks at the adulation of the friendly
mob found himself engulfed in a vor-
tex of frenzied men, women and chil-
dren.
Even the enthusiasm of mobilation
days in August 1914 did not approx-
imate in volume the popular acclaim
which today poured into the path of
tire nation's new. executive and al-
though the proverbial Hohenzollern
weather was denied him, numerous
manifestations of pre-war sentiment
and yearning greeted him all along
the route.
The old colors were there in pro-
fusion and the air was redolent of
inoth balls, for thousands of families
chests and ward robes had yielded up
an assortment of gaily bespangled
uniforms and other gala apparel
which went into seclusion with the
revolution of 1918.
Through it all Field Marshall Von
Hindenburg sat rigidly beside Chan-
cellor Luther, his face immnobile and
nmarked by pallor, while his right
hand automatically touched the rim
of his top hat as he responded to the
vociferous greetings to his right and
left.

APPOINTI COMMITTEE TO
REPORT ON ATHLETICS
I On the request of the Senatej
I Council, made at a regular meet-
ing of that body yesterday, Act-
ing President Alfred H. Lloydj
will appoint a committee of five,;
j representing the whole Univer-
sity, to investigate athletic andj
kindred conditions in the Uni-
versity. This committee will
present its report to the Univer-
sity Senate.j
MET THURSDAYi

BOARD IN CONTROl
WILL GIVE ANNUAL

Annual Smoker

PflMPI FTF DARI n

400 CAMPUS JOURNALISTS
EXPECTED TO MEET AT
UNION

AREI

Annual Convientionm or
Mamlgeineit GrIoump
Opeit iMay 11

Industriali
Will

BURSLEY IS CHAIRMAN
Dean Joseph A. Bursley is chair-
man of the committee arranging for
the meeting of the Taylor society
which is to be held in Ann Arbor for
f three (ays commencing Thursday,
(May 14. The meeting is held underI
the auspices of the University.
The society, which is composed of
prominent executives and engineers
from all over the country, is named
the Taylorvsociety toucommemorate
F. W. Taylor, a consulting engineer
who was with the Bethlehem Steel
corporation for some time prior to
his death in 1915 and who was a pio-
neer in scientific industrial manage-!
ment. He is credited with being one
of the men responsible for bringing
' the "piece rate" system of pay into
this country. He also advocated
"task and bonus plans" under which1
a bonus was given for all work fin-
ished before a set time limit, and the
system of functional foremanship un-'
der which a foreman had charge of
a single process.
The society's purpose is to forward
scientific industrial management of
lproduction. In so doing, they plan to
1 eliminate much of the waste of Ina-I
terials which results from the inef-I
ficient methods which are used to-
day.
The headquarters of the society isj
located in New York, and one of the
two regular annual meetings is held
there, the other being held at a dif-
ferent city each year.

MAIL INVITATIONS
'Staff Appointments Will Be Announced
By New Managing Editors And
Business Managers.
More than 400 students will attend'
lhe annual banquet given by the
1Boardl in Control of Student Publica-
tions in honor of the members of the
staffs tomorrow night at the Union.
Staff appointments for next year will
be announced at this time by the new
managing editors and business man-
agers.
Karl Edwin Harriman, '98, editor of
the Red Book and Blue Book, will de-
liver the principal address. His sub-
ject has not yet been announced, butI
will pertain to his experiences in the
field of journalism.
Mr. Harriman was on the staffs of'
the Detroit Journal and Detroit Free
Press before lie entered the magazine
field, where he has served on the Red
Book, Blue Book, Green Book, Pil-
(Continued on Page Two)
j ALL CAMPUS ELECTOI1
INSTRUCTIONS:-Place a c
the name of the candidate for

Scheduled ForIuuIILL I
Medics Tonight' FOR APPROACHING
Under the auspices of Galens, hon-
orary medical fraternity for juniors CA pujq E ECTION
and seniors, the annual all-medic
smoker will be given at 7:30 o'clock SIX CANDIDATES ARE NO31INAT-
tonight at Mimes theater. For sever- ED FOR BOAR[) IN CONTROL
al years the main feature of the pro- OF ATHLETICS
gram has consisted of presenting
take-off sketches of the medical fac- ADD C XNDIDATES
ulty. Those in charge of the event
have promised that tonight, also, im-i Three Booths Will Be Placed About
personationssof various members will Campus For Convenience of
Student Voters
be made by students.
Dr. Norman F. Miller has been Nomination of the candidates for
chosen to act in the capacity of toast- the Board in Control of Athletics for
master. He will introduce Dr. Law- 1925-26, who will be voted upon in
rence E. McCaffrey and Dr. Albertt
C. Furstenburg who will respond the all-campus elections tomorrow,
with short addresses. Following the were made by the Board of Directors!
speeches a number of vaudeville acts of the Athletic Association at a meet-
will be given including the imperson- ing held last night at the Yost Field
ations of the faculty, At the con- Ihouse. The condidates are; Glenn
elusion of the program the medico Donaldson. '26, Richard F. Doyle,
will retire to the Union ballroom '26, William B. Etheridge, '27L,
where refreshments will be served. Richard H. Freyberg, '26, Harry,
The subject to be treated by Doc- Hawkins, '26E, and George W. Rossi
tors McCaffrey and Furstenburg in Jr. The board of directors which1
their talks has not been announced nominated the candidates is com-
byse the conmittee in charge, but it is;
by he ommtte i chrge bu itisposed of the student managers of the
understood that the men will discuss l)as d fesdnt H.nYs, ofethe
teams and Fielding H. Yost, Director
some topic of general medical inter- of Intercollegiate Athletics.
est. Several additional changes were
J. B. Hassberger, '25M, is chair- made in the ballot, which will be
man of this year's smoker. voted upon at the pools tomorrow.
Lewis F. Merkekl, '27, has withdrawn
his name as a candidate for the off-
ice of treasurer of the Oratorical
association. Theodore Hornberger,
'27, was nominated to fill his place
fon the ballot. Two candidates for
officers of the Union have also with-
--Idrawn their names from the ballot:
Paul W. Bruskke, '26, withdrawing as
a candidate for literary Vice-Presi-
N, WEDN ESDAY, MAY 131 dent of the Union, while Robert W.
Wilkins, '27M, withdrew his name as
a candidate for medic Vice-President
ross in the square ([ )) before of the Union.
TIhree booths will be placed on thme
r whom you wish to vote. campus tomorrowat which all stud-
ents who registered during the three
days designated for this purpose, may
Students' Christian cast their votes for officers in the
seven activities appearing on the bal-
ssociationlot. The main booth will be located
in front of the library, while two ad-
(All ien Vote) Iditional booths are arranged for, one
( nin front of the medical and the other
PRESIDENT at the entrance to the dental building.
[ l JOiN H. ELLIOTT The Student Council will elect sev-
[eral members of the senior class to
[ ] RENSIS LIKERT take charge of the polls during the
[~~~~~ IRNILI RTelection.
Only those men who are in sym- Upon the completion of the voting
fI~ailth rit nI thCtii' Ithe ~ath willeti the t

t U H 10 2 1 ANwill be given out tomorrow night at
Hill auditorium at intervals during
the program given by Prof. William
Conilttee Members To Sell Tickets Sandoz, Swiss world-traveler and lec-
For Senior Dinner During turer, who will show pictures of "The
Remainder of Week 'Egypt of the Pharaohs" and "India
and Its Splendors." The program
CLASS TO MEET MAY 20 will start at 8 o'clock and election
news will be announced as soon as it
is made public by the Student council.
Tickets to the Senior Banquet No election returns will be available
which will be given- by the literary elsewhere.
class of '25 on May 20 at the Union, Professor Sandoz will show scenes
are now on sale at the Union and by photographed by him and reproduced
members of the class selected by Ed- on the screen by means of special
ward N. Hartwick, '25, chairman of apparatus. The reproductions are
the committee. Women may obtain neither retouched slides or motion
tickets at the Woman's League booth pictures, but are reflections by means
in University hall, today and the rest of autochromatic projections. The
of this week. , scenes are shown in their natural
Dean John R. Effinger, dean of the colors; no artists have touched the
literary college, will be the principal plates.
speaker, and the students will be rep- Professor Sondoz has given his lee-
resented by Dick Lawrence, '25, pres- tures in many cities of the United
ident of the class; Elsa Ohimacher, States, as well as in other countries
'25, vice-president; William Roesser, of the world, and newspaper reports'
'25 and Lyman Savage, '25. John describe the pictures as "startlingly
Bennett, '25L, will act as toastmaster. vivid,-lifelike and beautiful." The New
Songs will be started informally by York Sun declared the program to be
David Martin, '25, and 0. Henry Jekel, . of great help in the study of art.
'25. Pamphlets of Michigan songs The machine by which the photo-
will be distributed before the ban- graphs are reproduced is Professor
quet. An orchestra, which' has not j Sandoz' own invention. He does not
yet been selected, will also play. The speak himself during the program,
seniors will go to the Library steps but throws his lecture upon the screen
for the second Senior Sing at the con- as the views change, in order to oper-
elusion of the banquet. ? ate the projection machine himself.
Tickets sell for $1.50, and only one- His choice of scenes is very extensive,
fifth of the class will be able to ob- as he has spent the past 15 years
tamn them, due to the limited seating traveling. The program on Egypt-and
capacity of the Unio assembly hall. India, which will be presented here,
is but a part of the material he has
obtained throughout the world.
In the first part of the program,
which will be devoted to Egypt, the
ruins of antiquity, secret temples,
tombsIand mummies of centuries ago,
BUL FFEREDas well as more modern pictures, will
be shown. In the views of India,
All members of the senior . class Bombay, Madura, Tanjore, Jeypoore,
whose applications for tickets to the Odeypore Gwalior, Agra, Delhi and
Senior Ball have been accepted, may thessities crved A
exchange their notice of acceptance Professor Sandoz arrived in Ann
fora tcke atth dek i th UnonArbor yesterday and will leave soon
for a ticket at time desk in the 'UnIonatrthe r mneoor i
lobb ths afernon nd tmorow.after the performance tomorrow. Tick-
,lobby this afternoon and tomorrow.i ets to his program will be on sale at
tMembers of the ball committee will the box office of Hill auditorium after
be at the Union from 3 until 5 o'clock 7:30 o'clock tomorrow night.
.. .,. ,.. + m . a., '".f i t i - - -

I
I
I
3
s
f
i
i

FEAR lI)AIIO CONGRESSMAN
LOST IN HAWAIIAN DEEP~
Ialeakala. Hawaii, May 11.-
ICongressmman Burton French or
Idaho who left the rest house on
Haleakala mountain at 3 o'clock t
had not returned at 7 o'clock.
Search parties were sent out to
look for him. French is known
to have suffered from dizzy at-
Itacks and it is feared he may
havefallen into theacrater which
is 2,500 feet deep. The congress-
man complained on Saturdaly
that he did not feel well.
OPE[N TICKET SALE
rnn 4nnr nmmuni >rr

SWISS TRAVELER
TO OPEN PROGRAM
TOMORROW NIGHT
RETURNS OF .C'V)PTq t 'CTI( S
WIL BE GiJ' A
PROGRAM~
OWN PROCESS USED
Sandoz Reproduces Scenes in Natural
Colors Through Special
Apparatus
Returns of the all-campus elections

Michigan Union
(All Men Vote)
PRESIDEN T1

[
[
[
[

3
l

MINERAOGY.INSTRUCTORSIX NEW NAMES
PUT ON BALLOT
AWARDED WALKER PRIZE FOR ELECTIONS

ALLAN B. ADAMS
WILLIAM L. DIENER
RICHARD L. LAURENCE
HARRY G. MESSER
JAMES E. NEWTON
RECORDING SECRETARY
RICHARD E. BARTON
BRAYTON DEANE

I
I

[
[

3i
]

Edward F. Holden, i
the mineralogy departm
awarded the Walker pri,
the Boston Society of
Cory, for his paper on
of Amethyst," judged t
submitted to the societ
of geology and mineral
According to the wi
Dr. William Johnson
first prize carries with
in cases where papers
merit; otherwise $60.
paper was considered
ual merit.
'Through competition
er prizes is unrestrictc
the policy of the socie
the prizes in enco
younger scientists, rathl
wards for work of ma
tors. Memoirs for the
based on a considerable

instructor in Six morenames were added to the!
rent, h'as been official ballot for tie all-campus elec-
ze for 1925 by tions tomorrow, it was announced last
Natural His- Iight by tie electionscommittee of
"The Pigment the Student Council in general charge Ci
ie best to be of the balloting. Petitions to place [
y in the field tie name of Harold A. Marks, '26, and
ogy.I George L. Pattee, '25. on time ballot as
Sof time lategy candidates for the Board in Control of
Walker, the Publications were approved by the [C
it a $10 giftp present board last night. m
aihe oftuierktdCouncil nominations!C
are of marked '
Mr. lolden's coimittee also accepted the petitions
ommeof ~i~-of Earl L. Blaser, '27, 'Victor E. Dom-
hoff, '27, aid Eugene Power, '27 as [
for tie Walk- candidates for junior councilmen and [
r ithe Wak- bmof Charles Grube, '26, as a candidate
dty to award Ifor senior representative on the
ty to awaird council.
umagement of
er than as re- S i e [n
ttre investiga- Socte s Honor [
contest were
e body of orig- Major Carpent( r

LITERARY VICE PRES.
(Vote only for your department)

7
1
I

ROY II. CALLAHAN
GWYN M. HUGHES
EDWIN C. MACK

pathy withth ti purposes of ti - the baltSilbtontda h
dent. Christian Association should vote. Union by members of te council
who are not candidates for office.
The results of the election will be
Oratorical announced for the first time in The
Daily on Thursday morning.
Association .iA heavy vote is expected at the'
1polls, it was reported yesterday by
(E Alfred B. Connable, '25, president of
(amus the Student Council. The registra-
rPRESIDENT tion this year has been heavier; than
[ ] WILLIAM C. DIXON jin previous years and the elections
[ ] ELMER H SALZMAN committee expects that a record vote
will be cast.
VICE PRESIDENT I In case changes of names as they
[ ] ELIZABETH VAN VALKEN- appear in the ballot in The Daily
BURGH ; this morning are desired, telephone,

,i
,I
!

ENGINEERING VICE PRES.

Ji
]

]
]I
]I
]
]I

JOHN M. DUNNING
HARRY HAWKINS
RENSIS LIKERT
LAW VICE PRES.
EGBERT R. ISBELL
NEIL, H. SMITH
NOBLE TRAVIS
MEDIC VICE PRES.
ROBERT J. COOPER
WESLEY G. REID
COMBENED VICE IPRES.
EUGENE K. BUCK
BURTON A. GROUF

'todsay and tomorrow for this purpose,
Mary Duffield, '25, chairman, stated
yesterday. Tickets which are $5.,
must be paid for at the time the no-
tices are presented. Any tickets tin-
claimed by Thursday, will be sold to
other members of the class, the
, chairman said.
The final details for the decorative
1 scheme which will be used in the
Union ballroom the might of the dance
are being worked out this week.

z
,
9

[

] FRANK P. WEAVER
SECRETARY

Deister, 5717. as the ballot which will
be used at the polls will be the same
as the one appearing in The Daily.

PARTY TICU, f~A
Tickets fot the Freshman spring
party to be held May 22 at the :ew
Masonic Temple will go on sale at 2
o'clock today at the Union. They are
priced at $2; sale the first day will be
lim-ited to freshmen.

WILL SELL FRESHMAN

C-
I
[

l
J

DOROTHY I. CLINE
MARGIUER ITE V. DUTTON
MIRIAM M. OLDEN
TREASURER
THEODORE R. IIORNBERGE
ROBERT S. MILLER

II
i[

1

inal unpublished material, accom- ___
panied by a general review of the Major William T. Carpenter, retir-
literature of the subject. ing professor of military science and
The Walker prizes next year will tactics will be guest of honor at a din-
be awarded for papers on any sub-n ner to be given Wednesday, May 20, in
ject in the field of orithology. the Union. The banquet will be held
jointly by the Society of American
Members of the lass in Shop 4, un-I Military Engineers and the Scabbard
tier the direction of Donald L. Perkius and Blade society.
instructor in shop practice, madie a EPx-service men among members of
tour of inspection of the plants of .the the University faculty, members of the
Cadillac Motor Car company and the Army and Navy club, and graduatings
Dodge Brothers Motor Car company, students of the University R. O. T. C.
yesterday. will be among the guests.

[
[r

I
.1

I

i

[ L ROMLEY ROMINE Board in Control
Athletics
Student Council

uariOue oczey ; " panzS nh!oct y Terminating the class activities of
Chooses Officers Will Honor Cast the year, the affair will be the first
Ospring party ever given by a fresh-
E tOf Play Tonight man class. Tickets are limited to
t In a close election held Sunday the 20
following officers for the Catholic Stu- Music rthe r wi fur-
dents club were elected for next year: Honoring the cast of "Juan de las shudicyfor tedparty wis sbefur-
President, Frank Gallagher, '26: Vice- Vinas," this year's Spanish play, La nished by Ted Rhodes' seven piece
of 'president, Frank Atkinson, '26E; Re- Sociedad Hispanica will give a dinner o ra, fro g ut 1 o'gok
cording secretary, Louise Rittenhouse, at 6 o'clock tonight at the Union. The Programs are to given out the night
'27; Corresponding secretary, Harry Midnight Son's quartet of the Glee of the party.
J. Merrick, '27; Treasurer, Robert L. j club will give several songs while two
Weiseinburger, '27. or three other acts will furnish fur- Aiton TO Address
_________________ther entertainment.
Wellington, Australia, May 1..-I tElectionofmthe society's officers for Republican Club
Premier Massey of New Zealand is next year will be held at 7:30 o'clock
1IP~Il . A' h t h nin

(All Men Vote)
PRESIDENT

(tfen Only Vote))
(Vote for three only)

[

l

WILLIAM T. COIMAN
KENNETH C. KELLAR

[
[
[
[

l
:]
1
J
]I
]I
I]

GLENN DC
RICHARD
WILJIAM
RICHARD
HARRY H
GEORGE

OuAre)he MT

ONALDSON

Indiana Defeats
Hawkeye Nine, 2-1

Iowa City, Ia., May 11.-Iowa's
championship-seeking ball team re-
ceived a severe set-back here today,
when the Indiana nine defeated them
in a close game by a 2-1 score. Iowa's
defeat gives Chicago the undisputed
I hold on second place with five vie-
tories and one defeat.
BIG TEN STANDiNGS
I'

C
IC
II

SENIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for three only)
j ALLIN B. CROUCH
] LEE W. ENSEL
] JOHN L. GOW
] EBEN M. GRAVES
] CHARLES W. GRUBE
I LUCIAN LANE.
I CHARLES D. LIVINGS.TONE
] CHARLES G. OAKMAN
) L. BEAUMONT PARKS
] PHIL ROWE
JUNIOR REPRESENTATIVES
(Vote for three only)

Board in
Student
(Enitire

dead, aged 69. tomorrow nzgnt at te u nion
F. DOYLEgn Prof. Arthur S. Aiton of the history
B. ETHERIDGE j department will be tre speaker at a
H. FREYBERG ARRA NGE PROGRAM FOR CAP meeting of the Republican club which
AWKINS ,d,7'Jw~uill be held at 7:30 o'clock tonight
W. ROSS, JR. NIGH T*CEREMONIES rRIDAY Y "in ,Roon302 of tie Union. The sub-
ject of the talk by Professor Aiton
will be "Primo de Rivera and His
i Control of Cap Night, the traditional cere- the history department, will be the Government in Present-Day Spain."
monies at which the thousand fresh-1 faculty speaker, while William D. I The meeting is open to the public,
Su lilcation 5 df their grey caps will be cele- I Roesser, '25, retiring business man- and all those interested in interna-
Vten dahiegh, as i rt-ager of The Daily, will speak for the tional and political questions are in-
Campus Vote) prated Friday nig when the first- students. -vited to attend.
year men will throw their headgear The fornation of marcm to the Iol-
or three only) into the huge on-fire at Sleepy Hol-
low, has not been completed by the
I L. DIENER low. This event will signal their en- committee in charge, but will be a-all
E. CANDY trance into the ranks of the Sopho- nounced in The Daily tomorrow. The IC4Y"S
GARLINGHOUSE m oreclass. plan of assembling and the streets in
LANE The committee in charge of the af- the march will probably be similar to
A M ARK S plant o a ssemll pbli g andy the stm re t o
A. MARKS fair expects a record-breaking crowd; the procedure utilized at the event AMERICAN LEAGUE
. MSSI{and preparations are being made to last year. The Cap Night committee Boston 7. Detroit 4.

-p rocinils
',vam'it11.

the day both fair and

I
EI

(Vote f
WILLIAM
JOSEPH
JOHN G.
LUCIANI
HAROLD.
HARRY

-

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan