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February 24, 1925 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1925-02-24

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DEDICATED
TO
JUSTICE

5k i3Uf

IxiII

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

VOL. XXXV. No. 106 ,

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1925

EIGHT PAGES

PRICE FIVE CENTS

OHIO STATE GAINS
CONFERENCE LEAD
'AS IL[iNOIS LOSES
HOOSIERS STAGE BRILLIANT
RALLY TO CONQUER
SUCKERS
LOGAN AGAIN STAR

BIG TEN STANDING S

O1110 8 .
Ih1ihfis 7 .T
Indlianla 77
P~urdue 1.7
Minnesota r-
Iowa .:31
Wicon sin 1 .4
Ch'icago 1 .2

1
3
4
in-
6
7

.888
.875
.777
.571
.M)U
.-WO
.334
.222
.14:
.125

IEGANTO 6IYE
FI NAL TALK TOAY

iioilerim kern Defeat Wisconisin
To 1( 2; Spralling Shines
For Aliniiers

30

WAR REN UP AGIN
FOR CONFIRMATION
BY SENATE TODAY1
OPPONENTS EXPECTED TO SEEK
TO PUT NOMINATION IN
OPEN SESSION
FIGHT IN PROSPECT
Opposition Centers Around TestimonIy
Given In Investigation Of
Sugar Trust
Washington, D. C., Feb. 23.-By A.
P.)-Further consideration tomorrowE
of the nomination of Charles B. War-
ren of Michigan to be attorney gener-
al was agreed upon today by the Sen-
ate judiciary committee after a brietf
discussion of the matter.
Senators favoring, as well as those
opposing confirmation, predicted that
the nomination would be ordered out
of committee, and some adminstration.
leaders expressed confidence that fa-
vorable action would be taken by the
senate.
A fight on the floor is in prospect
and the leaders were not at all cer-
taro that action would be had at this
session.

Johns Hopkins Makes Plans
For Devoting Entire Time
To Postgraduate Research
GOODNOW OUTLINES PROPOSED SYSTEM AT

Chicago, Ill., Feb. 23. (By A. P.).-
Ohio went into first place in the West-
ern Conference basketball race to-
night by defeating Northwestern 34-
23 at Evanston, while Illinois, who
had held first position lost to Indi-
ana, 30-24 at Bloomington.
As a result of tonight's contest,
Ohio has 8 victories and one defeat,
Illinois has 7 wins and one defeat
and Indiana has 7 victories and 2 de-
feats.
The Ohio-Northwestern contest was,
extremely close during the first half
the lead changing hands several times
and the half ending 13-11 in the
Buckeyes' favor. Early in the second
period Ohio stepped into the lead and
was in no further danger.
There were three outstanding
stars: Miner, Ohio forward, Cunning-
ham, Ohio center and White, North-
western forward.
Bloomington, Ind., Feb. 23.-Indi-I
ana defeated Illinois, Western Con-
ference leaders, 30-24, in a spectacu-
lar basketball contest he're tonight.
The defeat toppled Illinois from the
conference leadership as Ohio State
won from Northwestern and now
heads the list.
Indiana staged a brilliant rally in
the last few minutes of play to win.
Illinois ledl at the half 17-8. The In-
diana squad uncorked a crushing of-i
fensive in the last half and scored 22
points against 8 for the Uubana quin-
tet.
Logan at forward was the out-
standing Indiana player, accounting
for 9 of his team's points as well as
playing a great defensive game.
Daugherty, Illinois forward, showed
best. for his team.I
More than 5,000 persons witnessed
tonight's contest.
Madison, Wis., Feb. 23.--Purdue de-
feated Wisconsin in a Western Con-
ference basketball game here tonighti
30-22. Spradling was the star for
the visitors. Purdue held the edge
over Wisconsin in basketshooting al-
though the Badgers had spurts of
good playing.
FAMOUS C'HEMIST
SPEAKS TOMO RROW

Swedish Professor

Will

Measurement of X-Ray
Lengths

Speak on
Wave

49TH ANNIVERSAR
FORTH IDEA OF S(
INTERNATIONAL P
Baltimore, Md., Feb. 23.-(By A. P,)
-Plans to make Johns Hopkins the
first American university which will
devote its entire time to postgraduate
study and research were announced
today by Dr. Frank J. Goodnow at
the exercises celebrating the 49th an-
niversary of the founding of the uni-
versity. Dr. Goodnow's plan calls for
doing away with the first two years of
college work and making the last two
years purely preparatory to post-
graduate study.
Dr. Goodnow said that as soon as
possible the university proposed:
"First, cease to give instruction in
most of the subjects now taught in the
first two years of college.
"Second, combine the work of the
last two college years with what is
now spoken of as graduate work, ap-
plying to all this work essentially the
methods and standards that are ap-
plicable to our present graduate work.
"Third, give on the completion of
this advanced work a higher degree

.Y CELEBRATION; SET
CHOOL FOR STUDY OF
ROBLEMS
and cease to give in the future the
batchelor's degree."
Dr. Goodnow's announcement was
one of three which were declared to
mark new advances in American edu-
cation. The other two were:
Announcement by Owen D. Young,
chairman of the Walter Hines Page
memorial, of the progress made in
plans to found at Johns Hopkins a
school of international research.
Announcement by Henry Breckin-
ridge, former assistant secretary of
war, that the Wilmer foundation was
delivering to John Hopkins its $3,-
000,000 fund for the establishment of
a great research, teaching and hospi"-
tal center in the field of diseases of
eye and the causes of blindness. This
institute, the first of its kind in Amer-
ica, is to be under the direction of Dr.
William Holland Wilmer of Washing-
ton, D. C., and will take up advanced
work such as America was dependent
on Europe for before the war, it was
said.

CAPPON, FORMER GRID
STAR, NAMED COACHI
Franklin C. Cappon, '23, for
the past two years director of
athletics at Luther college, De-
corah, Iowa, will be added to
the University of Michigan
coaching staff, according to an
announcement made today by
Director Fielding H. Yost. In
addition to his duties as assist-
ant football coach Cappon will
serve as an instructor in the
four year course in physical
education.
Cappon graduated from Mich-
igan in 1923 after having been
a star on the Michigan foot-
ball team for three years. lie
started on the Wolverine squad
in 1920 at end, played tackle
and fullback in 1921, and full-
back in 1922. He also won his
"M" in basketball.
Cappon was selected on the
all-Western eleven at fullback
in 1922 and was awarded the
Conference medal for all-around
efficiency in athletics and scho-
larship. He was also chosen
as general utility man by Wal-
ter Camp in 1922.

NOTED AUTHORITY
Prof. Manne Siegbahn of the physics
department at the University of Up-
sala, Sweden ,will give his final lec-
ture here at 3 o'clock today in room.
1041 new physics building. He will
speak on "The Exact Measurement of
X-ray Wave Lenths."
Professor Siegbahn will leave short-
ly for New York to attend the meeting
of the American Physical society be-
ing held at Columbia, where he is to
give another lecture on X-rays. He
is recognized as one of the foremost
authorities on X-rays in the world
and has done much towards advancing
the use of the X-ray in industrial
fields. It was due chiefly to the efforts
of Prof. G. A. Lindsay, of the physics
department, who studied with Prof.
Siegbahn at Lund university, Sweden
several years ago, that Prof. Slegbahn
came to Ann Arbor.j
In his lecture today he will describe
,the methods of measuring the wave
length of X-rays and tell something
of the phenomena and reactions of
X-rays at different wave lengths.
It Is expected, however, that the lec-
ture today will be of a very technical
nature and of interest chiefly to phys-
ics students and those familiar with
X-ray phenomena.
BUTLER CLAIMS
COLLEGES HURT
BY GOVERNMENT!
Michigan's universities are under
the "ice cold and death dealing
clutch of government," asserts Presi-
dent Nicholas Murray Butler of Co-
lumbia university in his annual re-:
port.
This state of affairs has been
brought about by state legislation
against private schools which has es-
tablished "a pagan monopoly" on
teaching, according to Dr. Butler, and
exists in only three states of the
Union, Michigan, Washington and Or-
egon.
Against the whole educational sys-
tem of America the Columbia head
places the charge of developing
"pasteboard heroes" and "papier-
mache leaders of opinion."
The fault of our system lies in "re-
iance on vocational study, over-or-
ganization, over-administration and
hysterical over-emphasis," Dr. But-
ler believes.
SA YS S TAINING
OF LIMESTONE
WILL NOT LAST
As is usual in limestone construc-
tion, discoloration is beginning to ap-
pear in the stone used in the con-
struction of Angell hall.
E. C. Pardon, superintendent of the
buildings and grounds department,
yesterday said that this is "not a de-
fect in the stone, nor will the dis-:
coloration be permanent."
The walls of the building are damp
he explained, and as the moisture
works its way to the surface, it
brings with it chemical impurities
which are found in all stone, leav-
ing the discolored appearance. The
warm sun of summer will do much
to erase these marks.
All limestone buildings go through
this stage, Mr. Pardon said, and then
turn slightly darker with the weath-
er.
Will Entertain
35 New Citizens
Thirty-five recently naturalized
: arill- l n n fAin thin hi-a

He will
Sept: 15.

'report for duty on

They expect, as the first move of the
opposition, an effort to have the
nomination taken up in open execu-M
tive session instead of secret session M
as is the usual course under the rules.
Opposition thus far has centered..
largely around the testimony given by
Mr. Warren in the "Sugar Trust in-
vestigation" year ago. Some admin-
istration leaders had discussed the I
question of calling Mr. Warren before'
that respect but they parently hav uss3a o B nae o
abadond te iea ap eBusses iMay NoW Be Engaged For 1
Isabandoned the idea. Special Parties at $7.50
This testimony was review by Presi- Per Hour
dent Coolidge and some of his advis-
ors before Mr. Warren was appointed,
and the position was taken that there LINES TO BE EXTENDED I
was nothing in it that in any way re-.
flected upon Mr. Warren. Expansion of the territory served, a
rearrangement of nearly all of the
i ~routes and a miaked increase In the
sredof the Burns Park-Depot line
COLLER WILL TALK ,are announced as some of the im-
provements in motor coach operation
after several conferences between
I Mayor George Lewis and officials of
theP 'Motor Coach company.
These changes will be effective
commencing Wednesday morning, ac-
Medical Students Will Bear Surgeon cording to the announcement made'
Tomorrow Night; Speech yesterday by A. D. B Van Zandt, pub-
T'o Be Illustrated licity manager of the company .
"It has been felt necessary to link
IS SECOND OF SERIES the hospitals with the passenger
depots and to accomplish this the
Prof. Frederick A. Coller of the Burns Park-Depot line will run overI
the present route but continue by way
surgical department in the Medical of State and Catherine to the hospi-
school will talk on "Surgery of the {tals terminating at Washington I
Dark Ages" at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow Heights and Observatory.
night in the west amphitheatre of the "The Packard-Huron route will re-
Medical building. His speech will be main unchanged except that instead of
Medicl building spec will umbe olooping at Morton and Granger it will
illustrated with a large number of run east on Brooklyn to Baldwin, re-
slides. This will be the second lecture turning over the same route. In this
on a series dealing with medical his- n ay the loop is abolished.
tory which is being held under the I "The Wshtenaw-Broadway line
auspices of Alpha Omega Alpha, na- will be extended at the north. It will
tional honorary medical fraternity, continue out North Main to Summit.
Professor Coller has given many then to Broadway going out as far as
lectures concerning medical history Cedar Bend Drive.
on the campus during recent years "The remainder of the terminals
and has made a reputation for him- [ will be combined so as to form really
self as a student in this field. four distinctive routes although oper-
The course of lectures was inaug- ated by the same coaches."
urated by the society because of the j "The coaches can be engaged for
desire of medical students to gain in- special parties either in the city or tot
formation albout medical history points outside. For such service the
There is no room for such a course charge will be $7.50 per hour for act-
on the curriculum. While the series ual running time with a charge of $5
was instituted primarily for studentsa " o"""r "ndin " h
of medicine, the speech tomorrow a orfrsadn ie
night will be of interest to pre-medics1
and the public at large. 4 S WILL REIPDOgIE
Europe Has Its '
Flappers Too, But RHODES UL!J UUI fIII
Oh, So Different New York, N. Y., Feb. 23.-Twentyi
scholarships for British students inz
"America. is not the only country American universities have been of-
that can boast of flappers," said Ar- fered by the Comonwealth fund ac-
I thur L. Dunham of the English his- cording to Edward S. Harkness, the
tory department, "but is one of the president. The Prince of Wales is
i few which have them in their univer- chairman of the British committee of
sities." award.
Dr. Dunham was born in England The scholarships will be patterned
and traveled in Europe before coming after the Rhodes plan and will be for
Ito America. In comparing the social two years enrollment in any of 26
status of flappers in France, England I leading American univesities.
and the United States ,he says: "Van- Men or women, married or unmar-
ity cases, galoshes, etc., are not ried, will be eligible. Selection is toc
found as often in England's universi- be made on the basis of character,
ties as in the universities of the United ability, qualities of leadership, health
States. One reason is that an educa- and general fitness. Three months'
tion in England costs from two to of travel in America at the end of the
three times as much as one in the first year is provided in each scholar-
United States. This excludes much of ship, the total value of which will be'
the flapper element. about $3,000.
"Generally speaking, the young wo-
men attending English universities
men a+$,n . -. ..-, ,. +.1 on(hl3r w7 Clih

PROSPECTS FOR PASSAGE
OF SHOALS BILL LESSEN .
Washington, D. C., Feb.23.
(By A. P.).-Prospects for en-
actment of Muscle Shoals legis-
lation at this session of Con-
gress were materially reduced
j today with the re-committing
of the Underwood leasing bill
to conference by the Senate.
By a vote of 45-41, the rul-
ing of President Cummins that
the conferees had exceeded
their authority bywriting new
matter into the bill, was sis-
tained. The ruling had been
debated for three days and was
on point of order raised by Sen-
ator Norris, Republican,. .e-
braska, who is leading the fight
for government ownership.
Detroit Agency Will Have Charge of
Students; Day and Mitchill
Commend Idea
WILL MEET WEEKLY
Studies of life insurance saleman-
ship will be offered to any students
who are interested in life underwrit-
ing as a profession in a class which
will meet at 7:15 o'clock every Tues-
day evening at the Union.
Both Dean Edmund E. Day, head'
of the business administration school
and Prof. John P. Mitchell of the
same school, have commended the
class as a fine opportunity for stu-
dents who wish to follow this line of
work and equip themselves with the
necessary introductory knowledge of
the profession, which is the only type
of salesmanship now being taught in
large universities of the country.
Among the institutions which offer
courses in life insurance salesmanship
are Pennsylvania, New York, Pitts-
burgh, Carnegie Tech, and Iowa State.
Representatives of the Cummings-
McLain agency of Detroit will have1
charge of the class from which they
expect to select several new district
managers. Those taking the coursej

DA9NCE INSTITUTE
WILL OPEN TODAY
Give Folk Dances to Provide Material
For Prospective Recreational
Directors
CONTINUES FIVE DAYS
Miss Elizabeth Burchenal will ar-
rive this morning from New York City
to conduct the five-day folk dance in-
stitutefor men and women, which will
open' at 5 o'clock today in Barbour
gymnasium.
The ticket sale has made rapid prog-
ress, according to Miss Ethel McCor-
mick of the physical education depart-
ment, but the remaining course tick-
ets will be on sale today in the di-
rector's office of Barbour gymnasium
at $2.50 each.
The object of the course is to pro-
vide material for those men and wom-
en who intend to direct recreation
work in industrial plants, playgrounds,
summer camps, schools, churches. It
can be used to supplement the work
of professional leaders, but the dances
are also suitable for use in entertain-
ments.
The course given here will consist
of 10 lessons of one hour each which
will be given at 5 and 7 o'clock, Tues-
day to Friday, inclusive, and from 10
to 12 o'clock Saturday morning.
Miss Burchenal will speak at the
regular staff luncheon of the physical
education department this noon.
STUDIES NEED 42 HOURS
WEEKLY, SURVEY SHOWS
Chicago, Ill., Feb. 23.-After an in-{
vestigation lasting for one year in

FAOUS 1EXPLORER
SPEAKS TONIGHT
ON ARCTIC TRIPS
HAS MADE TOURS TO LABRADOR,
GREENLAND, BAFFIN AND
CROCKER LAND
USES 89 FOOT SHIP
Lecture Will Be Illustrated With
Motion Picture and Lantern
Slides'
Captain Donald B. MacMillan, far-
famed Arctic explore and lecturer,
will speak on the Oratorical associa-
tion program at 8 o'clock tonight in
Hill auditorium. The subject of Cap-
tain MacMillan's talk, based upon his
most recent exploration, will be "My
Winter in North Greenland."
The expiditions headed by the
famous explorer have been mainly for
scientific research, especially in the
study of terrestrial magnetism, In
pursuit of which Captain MacMillan
plans to again head northward for
the purpose of establishing a perma-
nent magnetic obser'vational station.
On his recent expedition a memorial
tablet was erected at Cape Sabine to
the 19 members of the Greely Party
who lost their lives in government
exploration.
Since his first Arctic trip as a
lieutenant on the Peary expedition,
which reached the north pole, Cap-
tain MacMillan has made explorations
to Labrador, Crocker land, Baffin
land and north Greenland.
Captain MacMillan's voyages to the
Arctic regions have been made in a
small 89 foot craft named for his
alma mater, Bowdoin college, where
he is a Professor of anthropology. Al-
though frozen into the ice upon at-
tempting ;a return from Ellesmere
Land, where itremained frozen for
332 days, the ship returned in al-
most as good condition as she had
left.
Captain MacMillan's lecture will be
Illustrated with motion pictures and
lantern slides taken on his recent
trip. The pictures, covering his en-
tire voyage, and including various
scenes of Eskimo life, fields of ice,
animal and bird life, are considered
the finest views ever brought back
from the Arctic.
Varsity Matmen
Fall To Illinois
In Easy Contest
Illinois' wrestling team had little
trouble defeating the Wolverine mat
team in Yost field house last night,
taking the long end of a 25-7 score.
The Illini gained five falls, while the
Michigan team won two bouts, one on
t a fall and the other a decision.
Baker, the Wolverine feather-
weight, garnered two points for
Michigan by winn~ing an overtime
match from Tosetti, with an advant-
age of 2 minutes, 30 seconds.
Goldstein, the star heavyweight of
the Michigan team, gained the only
fall for the Wolverines by throwing
Brown of Illinois in the record time

Shiermni,
nient.

head of Chemistry Depart-
At Columbia Will Give
Two Lectures

Prof. IT. C. Sherman, head of the I
chemistry department at Columbia
university and a rominent figure in
the field of nutrition, will give two
lectures tomorrow at the chemical
amphitheatre. Professor Sherman
Will speak on "The Vitamins in Life
and HeIalth" at 4:15 o'clock andj
"Enzymes and Vitamins from thel
Chemical Point of View" at 7 : 30
o'clock.
Professor Sherman is noted for his}
work on vitamins and has written a
most authoritative book on this sub-
ject. Ile is also the author of "Meth- I
ods. of Organic Analysis," "Chemistry
of Food and Nutrition," and "Food
Products."
In 1917 he was a member of the
American Red Cross mission to Rus-
sia. At the present time he is chair-
man of the subcommittee on human
nutrition of the National Research
council and chairman of the commit-
tee on nutritional problems of the
American Public HIealth association.
Paris, Fell. 23.- The Reparations
commission remains the principal jur-
idical body set up under the Treaty of
Versailles.
Evanston, Ill., Feb. 23.-One case of
small pox has necessitated the quar-
antining of 500 co-eds at Northwest-
ern university.
0 rWeather1~au I

which it was attempted to discovero
what University of Chicago students of_46_seconds.
do with their time, it was suggested 7
that 42 hours a week be devoted to Student Elected
studying and two hours for parties. Head Of So
It was also recommended that the (
student devote four hours each week'
to serious reading not touching the lNorman B. Johnson, '25, w
regular courses, two hours to re- ed president of Kappa Phi
ligious and social service and seven national literary society, at 1
to athletics and physical education. ing of that organization hel
It was shown by the investigation fayette, Indiana over last w
that social affairs have been taking Johnson is also presidentf
approximately five hours of each stu- Nu, the local branch of the
dent's week, that basketball and foot- -
ball take up a large amount of time Vienna, Feb. 23.-The Aust
and that many students spend from ernment has decided to op
three to 15 hours commuti ; from state forests as a commerci
homes to college. prise.

ciety
'as elect-
Sigma,
the meet-
d at La-
week end.
of Alpha
e society.
rian gov-
erate the
al enter-

will be prepared to realize a
return immediately upon
school in June.

definite
leaving

DEAN DAY RETURNS FROM'
EXTENODD1ESTERN TRIP
Dean E. L. Day, of the business ad-
ministration school returned yester-
day from a week's trip through the
east. Leaving here Saturday, Feb.,
14, Dean Day went to Chicago, where
he attended a meeting of the Social
Science Research council. He then
proceeded to New York, where he
made a stop of two days before go-
ing to Washington.
F. B. HALE WILL TE

Bishop Nicholson Says Next
War Will End Civilization

Predicting that the next great war
will be almost the complete annihila-
tion of civilization, Bishop Thomas
Nicholson advocating an increasing
spirit of internationalism among the
various peoples of the world as the
only preventative of such a calamity
in an address on "International Ele-
ments in the Old Testament and Their

solving the problems of over-popula-
tion.
"Service, not supremacy, should be
the motto of the members of the white
race," he declared. "The experience
of the British Empire ought to be con-
vincing on this point for the rule of
Great Britain has been saved only by
her generous treatment of the col-
onies." The Bishop went on to show
1.nw, a m in, r- - r nnin nn + .+nnorf

vq

I

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