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November 15, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 11-15-1924

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SA'I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~A'T

al, J Y JL'ivil5 it

.

CONVENTIO

v

I

Heads Exchequer
In New Cabinet

I

Library Receives Collection
Of Rare Oriental Manuscripts

Gather onday for,
Meeting; Others Will
Arrive Wednesday

Two

EXPECT 70 DELEG ATFS
Architccts of the north central chap-
tcrs of the American Institute of
Architects will meet in Ann Arbor on
Wednesday, Nov. 1 for the opening
day of the convention which will be
held jointly between Detroit and this
city. The directors of the national
organization will gather here Monday
for a twoc day meeting previous to, the
opening of the convention..
Headquarters for both the meeting
of the directors and for the conven-
tion on Wednesday will be located at
the Union. The arrangements for the
visiting architects are being carried
out by the faculty of the architectural
college.
The convention will be opened with
a luncheon to be given Wednesday at
the Union. More than 70 architects
from the middle west are expected at
this luncheon. Prof. Emil Lorch of
the architectural college will give an
address of welcome and the meeting
will be presided over by Mr. Clark
Hammond of Chicago who is regional
director.
Wednesday afternoon a general
meeting of the convention and a dis-
cussion upon the education of the
architect will be held. Several ex-
hibits are being arranged by the archi-1
tectural college faculty for the enter-
tainment of the visitors, Late in the
afternoon the delegates will be driven
into Detroit for a dinner there.
Charles Harris Whitaker, editor of
the Journal of the American Institute
of Architects, will be here to attend
the convention, will speak to the stu-
dents of the architectural college next
Tuesday.
HAISLEY WILL ALDRESS
CAMBER OCOMMERCE
Otto W. Haisley, superintendent bf
the Ann arbor high school will be the
principal speaker, at the Chamber of
Commerce luncheon held at 6:30
o'clock Tuesday in the Chamber of
Commerce Inn. A complete public,
school program is to be carried out.
with Prof. C. 0. Davis of the school
of education acting as chairman.
As guests of honor all of the prin-
cipals of the various grade and high
ochools will be present. Prof. TR. A.-
Schorling, lrincipal of the University
high school, and L. L. Forsythe, of theI
Ann Arbor high school will be pres-
ent as high school representatives.
The principals of the grade schools
who will attend are: Miss C. L. Dick-
en, Miss Emily MIarschke. Mies Emma
Weitbrecht, Miss Ethel Hendrick,
Miss E. Bostedor, Miss Minnie Staeb,
and Wendell Vreeland.
Special tables will be reserved for'
the Parent-Teacher's clubs of thal
various schools. Vocal solos will be
sang by Frank Ryan of the Ann Ar-
bor high school.-
8HT
O R TO I IHT
FOR STUDENTS' RIGT

Oriental manuscripts which were re-1
cently presented to the University by
a donor who wished his name to re-1
main unknown, have arrived in AnnI
Arbor and have been placed in the
general library.
" :The manuscripts numberr487, and
*rz::: because of their extreme rarity, are
practically priceless. They include1
writings from the Arabic, Persian,
and Turkish, some of them dating as
far back as the eighth century.
More than 100 of the manuscriptsa
are commentaries on Mohammedan
BU ASLEY REPORTS'
University Committee Allows $6,0)0
To 75 Stadents; Maxinin
Amount $100
PROVISIONS VARY
Winston Churchill More student loans have been grant-
Prominent English Liberal who re- .e rn-
trso inent tglish Liberal who re- ed up to the present time this semester
turns to the cabinet as chancellor of
the exchequer in the Baldwin min- than during tne same time in any other
istry. He served as first lord of the I year, according to Dean Joseph. A.
Admiralty during the early part of the Bursley, chairman of the University
World war. ' committee on student loans. He esti-
mates that over $6,000 has been loan-
D , Finds Out ed to 75 students so far this fall in
amounts varying from $25 to $100,
lVhat Students Do the maximum loan allowed any one
r ~student dluring a semester.
With heir Oney Loan funds available for students
number 75 and vary from $50 to the
Many interesting answers were income on $10,000. In many cases,
brought to light recently, when the only the income may be used for loans,
Michigan Daily, by means of a num- according to the provisions of the
her of blanks, asked 100 men for in- donors, while in other cases the prin-
formation concerning the amount of cipal or both principal and income
concrnig te aoun ofmay be used for loans.
money spent while at college. The Dean Bursley attributes the great
sheets which were conducted by Ken- Dero B ors askedbfor thi fal
number of loans asked for this fall,'
neth K. Klein, '26, were sent out to to the difficulty in securing summer'I
obtain knowledge about the monthlyemly nt
e x p e"nd i t u r e .' ' ' ' ' -
expenditure. e securing a loan, each student
In the reply to the query, "Do you must appear before the members of
own a car?" one student wrote down the University committee on studentr
"Yes, one fifth of one." The majority loans which is composed of the dean
of the hundred, however, were not so of students, the (lean of women, the
fortunate, a few owning cars with reasurer of the University, and one
several morepossessing them in part, representative fromthe school or col
The question, "Under what condi- lege in which the student is enrolled.
tions would you spend more for cloth- After this appearance and presenta-
ing in Ann Arbor," brought eager lion of the student, the committee
answers, all to the same purport. One takes into account the moral character
student complained bitterly about the of the applicant, his habits of tem-
prt iteers here, stating that clothes perance and industry, and his success
could be bought cheaper elsewhere, in his studies before granting the
One man went so far as to express loan.
his thoughts about the high prices in
a poem.
S Themonthly cost for dancin
why the amount expended for taxis.
comes to only 34 cents. Sweets are I
vl olk 1d)y th~e average male as
somewhat over $2 is spent each
month for buying ice cream and Scabbard and Blade, national lion-

law, a subject of much interest recent-
ly to Western scholars on account of
the increasing contacts with Moslem
civilization, and the rest are literary
and historical writings of the best
authors.
Most of the manuscripts belonged to
the Sultan Abdul Hamid and were
only sold and exported when the
Young Turks came into power. AnI
option had been secured on them by
the late J. Pierpont Morgan but his
death occurred before the actual pur-
chase, and they could not be sold
until they were obtained by the donor
who gave them to the University.
In the collection there was discov-
ered a leaf of papyrus dating from
about 300 A. D. upon which was writ-
ten more than 30 verses of the 26th
chapter of the gospel of St. Matthew.
They were discovered by H. 1. Bell,
an expert of the British museum,
while he was sorting the manuscripts
for shipment. The text is practically
complete except for a small frag-
ment which has been torn away, and
it agrees substantially with the King
James version.
The nassage is the one describing
the Last Supper and the Betrayal.
Its most striking difference from the
King James version is in verse 2-8.
The translation is, "For this is my
blood of the new testament." The
text of the papyrus, in agreement
with certain ancient manuscripts,
omits the "new."
FINE-CLOTHES
j ° Young G9Xen.,
and those-. desiring
to appear young "
vill realize, the, privilege I
" of wearing "
40 MAcIOKFINCaOTH 51
have; been., a Standard I
ovrfor e7~'en
over a quarter of a
Century."
VAN BOVEN, CRESS &
" THOMPSON
" State St. And S. 1niversity "
*""""*''"""""'""

EDMONSON A1,INE
TO6B9OARDOF EIORSI
Prof. J. B. Edmonson of the School
of Education has recently received
notice of his appointment to the board
of editors of the Michigan Educa-
tional Journal, the official organ ofI
the Michigan State Teachers' associa-
tion.
Professor Edmonson is also a mem-
ber of the board of editors of the
Southern High School Quarterly pub-
lished as the nationl journal of high
school inspectors.
Tacoma, Wash., Nov. 14.-A new
principle in gasoline motors is being
tested here on a power boat.

A RoR NASH

NEW

LOCATION

One-half Block South of Packard Street
COMPLETE EQUIPMENT, JRAKE LINING, WRECKING
STRAIGHTENING FRAMES AND AXLES AND REPAIRING

S ALES
ERVICE

521 South Main St.

PlIONE' 11927

A. C. ARQUARDT

Pill 1

t .. iAm IAMSIrMlO

ue

ricr

Bought, Sold, Rented, Exchanged, Cleaned and Repaired.
We have nearly every make. We suggest that you buy CORONA FOUR
and save the/difference, about $40.00. Time payments if desired.

Udmh

D. Morrill

....... ...... W...
F

17 Nickels' Arcade

The Typewriter and Stationery Store

&a
MINA

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A new Patent Opera Pump
Shert Vamp
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7039TAN
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Bought Specially for Men with
Small Feet. Brown or Black Grain
Calf Barbour Welt. SIzes 4 to .
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A Dainty Opera Pump
One InchH eel
Turn Sole
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of Patent

!17 Si hMai .

Kinney Co Inc

Phone 343

. T ,

"I

candy. Cigars and cigarettes take
.( frm rhe -ankroll, while bil-1
liards costs $1.13.
To ove Offices
Dean E. E. Day, of the School of
Business Administration, announced
that members of the staff of the schoc
will move into the new business ad-
ministrafion ofiices in rooms 107 and
108 of Tappan ball the first part of

orary military fraternity, has pry-
sented the National Rifle associatiG'n
a marksmanshi) trophy to be award-
ed to the R. 0. T. C.' student firing
in the matches at Camp Perry, Ohio
with the' highest aggregate score in
the 200 and 300 yard rifle fire match,
the N. R. A. members match, Marine
corps match, the Navy match, and the
R 0. T. C. team match.
h'e cu is to be held by its winner
t : ce .,riiod of one year.
Hong Kong, Nov. 14.-Dr. Sun Yat
Sen, south China leader, left here to-

_ AK_

!i

SLATE IR

AM cm s
vwm
IL

No

BO0

T 0RE

-.

next week. d(ay for Shanghai.
New York, Nov. 14.-Student rightnaf n
have a new champion. A national conm-
mittee made up of leading university
professors and educators has recent-
ly been organized, headed by P.of. uom In .
Clarence R. Skinner, of Tufts col-
lege, Mass., "to fight interference by HARD AND SOFT DOMESTIC
UQllege authorities with the rights of
students to hear radical speakers." COAL AND COKE
It also proposes to deal with rc, offi t Phone 190 F-i1
strictions on teaching of certain sub- yd Phone 1950 F-2 ANN ARB{W. MI(
jects such as evolution, pacifism, and
particular concepts of history; with
college rules restricting student lib- Ili i8
oral and radical activities; and with i
interference with fredom of opinion Yea for the Michigan Team
of individual students and teachers n
outside the classroom. Yea for the Band you love to hear
Yea for Millinery you enjoy to wear
Tripp Estate Is Yea for; the Moderate Prices you get at
Wisconsin Gift Puyear & Hintz
Madison, Wis., Nov. 14.-Regents of
the University of Wisconsin have re- 2 328 South Main
cently received the estate of the late
J. $tephen Tripp, of Prairie du Sac,>.IM III il 1I 16111fiti [1itiilIIO1111111IIt11 iltll9 lil1i
amomnting So ait $.50.000_ b 'h

mom=

m

The Varsity service
is as. near to you as

.rM
rt
~y, ~,+ , ft
r}}
i ; { Vie..
I /. r Qx i y
>{
fR
.Sir
. ,
,, '
. ,
t

II ~ -.

0 At
d

i r,- oo"

-4 - t r
IThEc '

a~s

your

telephone

uwN F' ' t hnGIm

....-. vs- vt EU. .. i Wi'iE..7 , .
. . .. rw.... .

I

Our pride is
delivery ser
you taken a

a real.
vice.
idvanta

good
Have
~eof

it?

in behalf of the university as the
nts see fit. The first $200,000 in-
will be applied upon the M.om1-
Union.
YATCJI THE CGRID-G"RAPH
What gives us most
pleasure is the continu-
ing patronage of those
who have eaten here I

The Arbor Fountain
BOn State Street
Betsy oSs .Shop

Ep
STA6 DIRQON F !0#3Et? K4.-
LAIINSG MALE CHARACT
r" NEW YORKti PfRObUTION "'AtW' Q
"Uncle Wiggily," 3 P. M.-35c and 50c
"Robin Hood," 8 P. M.-50c and 75c

In the Arcade
- - ONE MANAGEMENT

TWO SHOPS

Pone 2076 or 2077

Candies,

Get an M-Book

Punch
The best Punch
in Ann Arbor
Call us up.
Phone 1890-M

day after day. And it
is surprising how many

Filled with

our Delicious

Candies

aI ..W MW e, I

II

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