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September 20, 1924 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 9-20-1924

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY,

..

NEW UNIVERSITY
HIGH OPENS WITH
S18 ENROLLMENT
(Continued from Page One)
under the present plan with the first
three years as Junior high,, it is ge-
pected that all grades will be includ-
ed at the end of two years. Professor
Schorlir.g expects to have 500 stud-
ents enrolled in five years. It is not
his aim, however, to push the at-
tendance record of the institution but
to let it grow gradually and pay the
utmost attention to curricular prob-
lems and the proper training of1
teachers.
The program of studies as well as
the number and the character of the
school activities will be arranged
with the idea of attaining simplicity
of student life. Chief among the
hopes of the new school is the de-I
sire to achieve greater individual in-
struction than is in vogue in the mod-
ern high school.
The school day is divided into hour
classes, from 9 to 3- o'clock, with an
hour for lunch. In addition to the
above all the students meet at 8:30
o'clock in their home rooms for a
daily assembly and physical educa-
tion work is required three times
during the week.
The new building has been out-
fitted with the best mechanical aids
possible for education and is coma
plete in every detail. Double tables
for students have been provided in
all classrooms rather than the con-
ventional arm chair arrangement.
Professor Schorling beieves that this
will distinctly aid the pupil in his
work.
In the science rooms the desks are
combination writing tables and ex-
perimental work desks combined.
This saves both time and space as the
student need have but one desk for
his laboraory and his classroom
work. The biology department also
has a,specially outfitted room, and in
addition it will have a greenhouse.
The auto mechanics shop is. a sig-
nificant unit in the Industrial Arts
shop. This is in addition to the ma-
chine and wood shops and is so con-
structed that automobiles can be
driven on to the floor for study by!
the students.<
A special boys' club room for meet-
ings of the different societies that
may be formed is also provided. This
is immediately off from the princi-
pal's office so that, he can get in
closer touch with his pupils and work
with them. In addition there is a
large reading room and study hall
extending the width of the building
where sudents can profitably spend'
vacant hours.

TE MPORARY DIRECTORY
BEING M DEBYSCIAr
In accordance wih is usual custom,
the Student Christian association has
organized a temporary directory of
all students registering at the Univer-
sity. This work is a regular part of
the program of the association and
all students coming in are immediate-
ly registered and their addresses
taken. Already there are several
thousand names on file, and the direc-
tory is available to all who desire
information of this nature.
Representatives of the association
have been meeting trains coming into
this city, and helping freshmen to get
registered and to find rooms. The as-
sociation also is conducting a special
bureau, where desirable rooms are
listed for he students, and it is urged
that those having rooms to rent
list them at this bureau, and so help
the association in this work.
In addition to a large, airy gym-
nasiun and a complete locker room,
there has been built a special recrea-
tion room, where any social events of
the school can be held. This is
roomy, although somewhat smaller
than the gym and does not have as
cold an atmosphere as the conven-
tional gymnasium.
Tuition in the new high is 36 dol-
lars per year and includes all ex-
penses. In addition to the tuition,I
pupils have 'to provide their own
books and locks for lockers. Each
student has been provided with a five-
foot coat locker in, the hall, as near
as possible to his home-room.
It is the further hope of the school
in establishing these home rooms,
that the teacher of these may be of
service in establishing a good public
spirit in the institution and a fine re-
laionship with the individual pupil.
In addition a definite, desirable cor-
relation of the work which the pupil
does in the different school subjects
is sought for.
There will be no mid-year groups
this February. It is felt by those in
charge that if the school grows grad-
ually more attention can be given to,
curriculum problems.
United States Veterans' Bureau has,
moved from its former quarters at
Lane hall to room 105 Mason hall.I
4. AV AW -X& wiaw -

SPEAKERS CHOSE
FOR 34THANNUAL
ORATORICAL SERIES~
(Continued from Page One)
"The Servant in the House," "The
Terriable Meek," "The Idol-Breaker,"
and many others, wrote, directed, and
takes a leading part in the play.
Also taking part in the play are
Edith Wynne Matthinson and Mar
garet Gage, both of whom are well
known to stage-goers. This company
appeared on the Oratorical lecture
'program of three years ago and was
Ewell likted at that time.
On December 9, Edwin M. Whitney.
-the popular dramatist interpreter, will
read the selection which has been ap-
plauded by eastern audiences durinn
the past year, "In Walked Jimmy."
Since 1902 Mr. Whitney is said to.
have given over 5000 public recitals.
What many consider the best num- I
ber on the program will be given
on. January 15 when George Creel, 4
better known as "Uncle Henry," will6
speak on "Love, Marriage, and Other
Perils." Mr. Creel was chairman of
the federal' committee on publicity and 1
propaganda during the World War l
and is a regular contributor of hum-
orous, yet pointed, articles to "Coll- I
ier's Weekly." His speeches have
been described as "a heap of humor,
a dash of irony, and a bushel of com-
mon sense."
Harry Emerson Fosdick, who deliv- 1
ered the commencement address here
a year ago last June, will appear on(4
the program on January 23. Mr. Fos-
dick is professor of practical theology {
at Union Theologiel Semin .ry, New l
Yorl City, and is quite well known I
throughout the country. Besides be-
ing an eliquent speaker he is also the .
author of several prominent works,
,among them being "The Assurance of
Immortality," "The Manhood of the
Master," and "The Challenge of the
Present Crisis.
'Henry Van Dyke, American ambas-
sadore to Netherlands and Luxem-!
burg from 1913 to 1917, will speak:
sometime in February. He is profes-
sor emeritus in literature of Prin-
ceton University and an author of
some note. Among his works arer
"The Wise Man," and "The Gateway
ISeries of English Texts."
STUDE
GI SECURE YOUR SL

Tom Skeyhill, popular soldier-poet ian, Mr. Skeyhill spent two years in
of Australia, will close the series on Russia gathering material for this
March 23 with his now famous lec- lecture, and is considered well quali-
ture, "Soviet Russia Today." A fled to speak upon this subject. His
world travelor, economist, and politic- lecture "Soveit Russia Today"is said
I IT PAYS TO COME DOWN TOWN

to be a masterpiece. athletic coupon book. Prof. 'T
All of these lectures will be given C. Trueblood, head of the
in Hill auditorium. Applications for speaking department, is chairn
course tickets at $2.50, $3.00, and the committee for picking Ora
$3.50 have.been distributed with the association speakers.

OPENING DANCE

STUDENTS GET YOUR

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Engineer and Architects Materials, Stationery, Fountain Pens,
Loose Leaf Books, Typewriting and Pound Papers,
Candies, Laundry Agency, Tobaccos.
Read The Daily "Classified" Columns

'ii

'THE
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SHOP
600 E. LIBERTY
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STARTING
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2:00- 33
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