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October 15, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 10-15-1924

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY,

BURTON ADDRESSES
C. OF C. LUNCHEON
cnumbr of Commerce Intends to
Create Closer Bond With
University
IS ANNUAL AFFAIR
President Marion L. Burton and the
deans and administrative officers of
the University were the guests of
honor at the Chamber of Commerce
luncheon held yesterday noon in the
Chamber of Commerce inn. This is
the second annual University Day
program to be held by the Chamber
with the object of creating a closer,
bond of interest between the Univer-
sity and the city.
President Burton was the principal
speaker. "I want to express the ap-
preciation, in behalf of the University,
for all that the Chamber of Com-
merce has been doing for the Univer-
sity of Michigan. The spirit behind
the sending of the band to Illinois
means much to the University," he
said.
Taking up the recent building pro-
grain which hasbeen carried on at
Michigan the president said that
never in the history of universities
had so many new buildings been
opened for use as in the past year at
Ann Arbor. Ile thanked the business
men for the help they rendered when
the legislature came to Ann Arbor to
investigate conditons, and he highly
praised the regents for their tireless
eff9rts in behalf of the University.
"This winter," said President Bur-
ton, "I shall ask the legislature to in-
crease the income from the mill tax
to the extent that we may accomplish
the three great things which the Uni-
versity's highest success demands,
today, namely that we may pay more
adequate salaries to our present
teaching staff, that we may increase
the number of teachers to handle the
increased number of students, and
that we may derive an income suffi-
cient to miaintain and operate this,
greatly enlarged plant of ours. The
extent of this needed increase neither
I, nor anyone else as yet, knows."
In closing the President expressed
his desire that the University of
Michigan be second to none, and thiat
hi aim nd the aim of the communit

J
i

t

sdale Does Preliminary "F'W STUDENTSUSE
Work In Michigan Archaeology'[
, A ENRT I- AI IlXS

Prof. W. B. Hinsdale, director of the I state and lead up to an intensive
division of arciaeology of the mu- I study of the subject which will takei
seum of zoology, who returned to years for completion. i tuo Maike Use of Service Supplied.
Ann Arbor Saturday after a brief va- More than 600 Indian mounds, in- Campus Repulican
cation in the East,rspent the greater closures and other earthworks were Club
part ,of the summer in making an definitely located, and a number of; ___
archaeological reconaissance of the old burying grounds, camp sites and LAST CHANCE TODAY
state of Michigan. routes of travel were found. The L
This work, according to Prof. Hins- western half of the lower peninsula
dale, was merely a preliminary sur- of Michiga as the scene of the of the free service for absent voters
Vey, with the 'view of locating andI work, but trips were made across the offtefreyeRepuforcabsntclvoters
obtaining information regarding the straits into the upper section of the' re b the Republicans as
remaining Indian antiquities of the .state. little more than 500 applications had
Allaithisnworkngreatly ftcilt-e.been received yesterday, according to
Ail this work was greatly facili officials of that organization. Today!
Fights Brookhart tated by the use of a Ford car, which hI
was presented to the archaeological witl bsupplied.
division of the museum for use in the
work of exploration by Henry Ford. office of the club in Room 302 of the
Field notes taken on the trip comn- Union or at the table in the corridor
prise more than 0 pages of writteh of University hll. Yesterday three
matter, exclusive of a large number tables were placed on the campus for
of charts, drawings, and photographs. the convenience of students.
.....This material will be used an "n he applications, after being filled
troduction to Michigan Archaeology," out by the students, are notarized and
which is being prepared for publica- mailed free of charge to the county
tion and which will be printed later clerks of the home precincts. SU-
this year. . dents are urged to make out their
Prof. Finsdale was accompanied in applications properly, to avoid delay.
this work by his assistant, Mr. Frank Tx
is no takiigThe club can extend the privilege of
Creeland, who is now takingadva this service only to those persons
tage of a scholarship in sociology at who se regi ered in ther one
Colubiaunierstyprecincts. T he service is rendered to
all regardless of party affiliations.
h ~Cercie Francis The time and place for notarizing
ballots will be announced later, at
". ...Elects Oldicers which time free service will again
be given.
Le Cercle Francais held its firs:d
meeingof he ermat :30a'cocl, IPrescribed as a definite part of
lastng in Uhniersity all.7: h o' many college curriculums, intramural
last night in University hall. The of- activities "appeal to the students who
Luther A. Brewer ficers for the coming year are: Presi- are unable to compete in Varsity ath-
Luther A. Brewer, prominent Iowa; dent, C. B. Cummings, '25; vice-presi- letics. With the single exception of
Republican, is campaigning for sena- dent, Vivian North, '25ed; secretary, football, those same Varsity activities
tor as an independent, in opposition Mary K. Williams, '25; treasurer, E. are dupicated for all the men in
to Sen. Smith W. Brookhart, the G N. Karay, '26. Captain R. V. Finney Michigan by the department "We
0. P. nominee. Brewer says he is will again act as director of the or- j'want every man in Michigan to ap-
running to give Iowa Republicans "a ganization as he has in the past. preciate that a little exercise now and
ehance to vote for a Coolidge man." then will keep his mind on edge for

SCIENTIFIC DIRECTORl
TO DISCUSS PHARM CI
Dr. H. C. Cooper, scientific director
of the firm of Bauer & Black, Chi-
cago, will lecture at 8 o'clock tomor-
row night in the Natural Science audi-
torium on "Pharmacy and First Aid."
This lecture will be of special in-
terest to scientific students, but the
general public and student body are
invited. Lantern slides and motion
pictures will be shown.
Immediately following the lecture
by Dr. Cooper, the Prescott club will
hold its first meeting of the current1
year in room 300 of the chemistry
building.
Menominee, Oct. 14.-More material
has been gathered here to be presented
in the boundary dispute between the
States of Michigan and Wisconsin.,
Do Your Duty, Be Sure and Vote.
Rca la the beauty of theScarlet Tanager
Red ad Black
Combination

The Edward Co
Philadelphia
Exclusive Tailors to Coilege Men
Our representative will show at the Allenel hotel Wcdne aday
afternoon and evening. He shall have with him 250 patter1:s of
imported and domestic woolens. Come down and see the nc w st .
model, the Harvard; a one-button English sack that rolls the .;niih
of the coat. This model is out of the designers' hands but two wdRers.
He will also have with him a complete line of top coat, overcoat
and Tuxedo materials.
This is our first time in the west. We hope to establish ourselves
in Ann Arbor as we have at Yale, Princeton, Penn, Dartmoutih, Cornell,
and Harvard. '
Two Prices 578,
$28.75 $38.75
A Few at $45.00.
A sma- 1 deposit is all that is required to place an order.
La '1k 'iil111111111i111/11111/

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2
i Out of sight-
out of harm's
way-is the
Parker Press-
Button Filler
2Ink-Tight be-
cause of the
extra sleeve
inid the Duo-
Sleeve Cap''

Do Your Duty Be Sure and Vote.

studies," said Director Mitchell.

mate.
ARMY AND NAVY CLUB,
TO HEAR PROFI. COLLERi

was to obtain the highest results for:
the betterment of this city and for acqu
the youth of tomorrow. form
Shirley W. Smith, secretary of the unit
University acted as chairman, and in- club
troduced the guests to the business nigh
men. He called attention to the fact form
that the University brought annually seen
to Ann Arbor over $19,000,000 exclu- tere,
sive of the athletic, oratorical, and. gani
musical contests and exhibitions. Be eon
further expressed his appreciatiofn of of a
the work which the Chamber of Com* Pr
coerce is doing in bringing the Uni- Part
versity and city together for the mu- even
tual benefit of all. tion
Unit
of 1
SED CLUB ELECTS ervi
head
O NFFIESA MEETIN
iRRS 0 1 Cresel
Y Pr
Officers for the ensuing year were vars
elected at a meeting of the Men's Stat
Educational club Monday night in
the Michigan Union. Officers elected a
were: president, W. F. Watts, grad.;
vice-president, H. H Williams, grad.;'
and secretary M. L. Byrne, of th'c
University high school faculty.
Prof. Raleigh Schorling, principal
of the University high school, spoke
on "The Relation of the University
high school to the state and to the
School of Education." He pointed out
that the University of Michigan was
the first large university,'outside of
Columbia university and the Univer-,
sity of Chicago, to establish an ex-
perimental school as a part of time
program forthe professional train-
ing of teachers.
Professor Schorling stated that thel
University high school selected as its
objective the individualization of in-
struction, the emphasis of more than
mere subject matter, and the inculca-
tion in the pupils of a desire for:
rigorous intellectual wodk.
In conclusion he pointed out that
the, functions of the school were four:
to act as demonstrator of expert
teaching for principals and superin-
tendents in the state, to develop new
phases of high school curriculum, to
develop a new type of practice teach-
ing, and to conduct experimental in-
vestigations on educational problems.

eeting for the purpose of getting
ainted with the doctors who will
Lpart of the staff of base hospital
No. 111, the Army and Navy,
will meet at 6 o'clock tomorrow
t in the Union. The club was
ed after the war by men who had
military service and anyone in-
sted in military affairs. The or-
zation takes the form.f a lunch-
club and has- a membeship list
bout 40.
'of. F. A. Coller of the surgery de-
ment will be the speaker of the'
Ling and will talk on ="Organiza"
and Functioning of the Hospital
," at the same time relating some
his experiences while in active
ice. Professor Coller is now at the
. of the base hospital unit No. 111
ch forms a part of the national
rve system here.
inceton, N. J., Oct. 14.-Harvard's,
ity crew will row against Penn
e, Nov. 14, on Lake Carnegie.
0 YouYotedt Apply on Camptis.

ESYASLU$IIED tSeS
C - OT H IN O
-- .. _ _- -
04DISON AVENUE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREiT
"IE* YORK
Telepione Murray [ill 8Soo
Our Representative will be at the
HOTEL STATLER, Detroit
Today, October 15
with Samples of Ready-made Clothing
Furnishings, Hats and Shoes
for Fall
Send for " Historic American Buildings"
8 0 S T u.E NEWPORY
TREMONTCOR.sOYLSTO 220 BELLE WEAvus us

Duof ld
is worth its
weight I n gold
Its jewel-Smooth 25-Year
Point Gives Your Hand the
Winning Speed and Character
Y ES, every- day new situa-
tions arise when this hand-
size, rapid, jewel-smooth writer
beats the clock to the finish-
to pass a test, take full lecture
notes, complete any work in
hand on the dot.
Its Over-size Barrel holds
that extra ration of ink that will
tide you over a few more days,
or a few extra pages of writing
that you can't foresee. And the
"Lucky Curve" feed delivers
the ink with sure-fire certainty.
Better replace your old pen
with this inspiring Classic.
If not mistreated, we guaran-
tee its jewel-smooth point for
25 years' WEAR. Its black-
tipped lacquer-red barrel makes
it handsome to own and hard
to mislay. Step in to the pen
counter and get it. Come out
and pull a good one.
THE PARKER PEN COMPANY
ParkerDuofold Pencils to match the pen, $3.50
Factory and General Offices
JANESVILLE, WIS
P'arke , n( %g
Duofold Jr. $5 Lady Duofold $5
Sam, exeept for size With ring for chatelaine

fr.

rou owe one to rourseif
HAVE you ever considered the many advantages of a
portable typewriter in college and in all your after life?
Ask any upper classman who uses one, and he will
give you some valuable pointers.
And here are six reasons why you should chcose
the Remington Portable:
Durability and Reliability
Compactness and Portability
Four-Ro'u Standard Keyboard
Ease of Operation
Beautiful fork-Always
Ulni~veral Servie
Price, complete with case, $60, Easy payment
terms if desired.
Call in and let us show you its many decisive ad-
vantages.

George S. Register
604 E. Madison St.
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Mayer Schairer Co.
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Remington Typewriter Co.
Detroit, Mich.

e inton Portable
THE RECONIZED LEADER-IN SALES AND POPULArITY

--- '-. y __________________'

We are Headquarters for
Suede Leather Jackets in brown, gray and tan are very popular this fall. Everyone is
wearing them, the ladies as well as the men. We have a large assortment of high grade
leather jackets in Reindeer, Napa, Horsehide, Colt and Sheepskin-and our prices are as
popular as the jackets. Priced from $9.75 up.
TOWER'S SLICKER COATS
Cravenettes, Topcoats and Reefers
Auto Robes, and Steamer Rugs
Wool Shirts, Heavy Plaids,Corduroy and Outing Shirts.
Hiking Shoes, High-Top Moccasin Packs, Puttees, etc.
Breeches in large assortment, Over-Alts and Cover-Ails for shop use,
Alarm Clocks, Hunting Knives, Axes, Trench Mirrors, Grids, Stoves, and in
fact many needs for the college man.
It will pay you to walk a few blocks
SurAur"ufniM tr

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,,

A

Pertinent
Message

People of
crimination

superior
demand

dis-
that

their laundered clothes be

ALUMNI MAGAZINE ISSUES
FIRST NUMBER Of YEA R

clean,

soft,

and

white.

We cater only to those
who demand that satisfac-

First copies of the new Michigan
Alumnus, official organ of the Alumni
association, have been mailed to sub-
scribers. The magazine, the first is-
suQ to be published on the new Alumni
press, will now appear weekly for
the remainder of the college year.
Increased in size, now 8 1-2 by 11
inches and with 24 pages, the newI
issue is published with a two-color
cover and many other improvements
over the old Alumnus. Among the
stories appearing this week are those'

tion.

1-4

. .'The

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