100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1924 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 10-10-1924

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

10, 1924

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E

-TO SERVE PUBLIC

I
t
1

doughnut flour manufactured by th'e baking had to be done, it has grown n ritur n, i
Century Baking Company of Jackson, to be one of the most modern and I S
Mr. Millard has gradually increased best equipped bakeries in Ann Arbor.
the output of his concern until today In its history it has been in the hands ru it
are not uncommon for one days' pro- owned and managed by R. F. Bross,
duction. "And I haven't conquered who purchased the shop two years
Ypsi yet", declared Mr. Millard. "When i ago from Mr. Stebe, his predecessor. Merchants of Ann Arbor are afford-
I do I expect to sell one thousand Ied excellent service by a specialized
dozen each day." Dawn Donuts em- concern to aid them in their service
ploys two rucks to distribute ;its Gdets Cafe to the consumer. The specialized

i
i
I
i
.

8TORE, S CATER TO STUDENTS
AS WELL AS RURAL
TERRITORY,
MANY BANKS
4nn .Aor Well Located To Handle
Demands of Diversified
Patronage.
Ann Arbor is particularly well fitted
t t haudle the task of supplying the
vants of the people throughout this
Scommunity for a city of its size. In
addition to . the resident population
. ie stores cater to the students of
the University as well as the sur
rounding rural territory.
Due to the cosmopolitan clientele
the stores have kept apace with the
advances made in the various lines
of busijess throughout the country.
In the way of taking care of the food
demands of the city, Ann Arbor is
particularly well blessed. The bak-
eries and dairies are of the most
modern and sanitary type found in the
state. In addition to this they are
Very well fitted to handle the varying
dengands made rmpon them at th
times of football games, May. festival,
and Commencement as well as the
slackened demand during the sum.
mer. The grocery stores all furnish
an excellent service in the way ot
meeting the retail demand for fresh
and staple groceries.
Located as the city is between De-
troit and Toledo they are particular-
ly well able to fulfill the desires of
the hungry public. The neighboring
farms supply an adequate supply of
dairy products needed to keep the
=students healthy.
Clothing Stores.
In the way of clothing, the demands
are filled in a metropolitan manner.
In addition to the large department
stores the mens haberdashery es-
tablishments do much to keep the
students always satisfied and dressed
in the latet styles. The ladies ap
parel shops carry the odd little things
that makes the woman's outfit com-
plete. Here too does the college stu..
dent find the latest in novelties to
suit her fancy.
They art shops and gift shops are
perhaps the most unusual for the size
of the city. Clever novelties in bronze,
leather, "and paper as well as in china
1 are always available and are said
not to be surpassed any place west of
New York.
Book Stores
Another line of business that runs
" n line with a university community
is the book business. Here again
Ann Arbor is not behind, for in ad-
4 dition to the text books and sup-
plies kept on hand one can always
find the latest in fiction, science as
well as contempoary history and
other social science treatises.
In addition the usual orthodox
stores as drug, hardware, dry goods
and the restaurants are of unusual-
ly high caliber and are always will-
ing to serve the people in their de-
sires.
A further indication of the pro-
gressive business community found
k here is seen if one observes the num-
ber and high grade of the banks
found here. A few of the merchants
who are in a position to serve de-
viands for the satisfaction of your
hunger are as follows
Sugar Bowl
The Ann Arbor Sugar Bowl, 109
South Main Street, originally known

product to the many fraternity houses
and restaurants which, compose its+
clientele.
McLean and Neeland
Another of the many retailers using
the Merchant's Delivery Co. in place
of a delivery system of their own is
McLean and Neeland, dealers in staple
and fancy groceries, fresh fruits and
vegetables. This grocery is the sole
agent in Ann Arbor for the Sprague
Warner and Co. Richlieu lable prod-
ucts which guarantees .the consumer
a very high grade of staple merchan-
dise. The fruits and vegetables are
shipped in from nearby centres such
as Detroit and Toledo or are broughtl
directly from the farmer. By a policy
of service and quality to consumer
this store has built up a large fol-
lowing among the various fraterni-
ties and sororities on the campus.
Gfell Market
One of Ann Arbor's leading meat
dealers is the Gfell Meat Market lo-
cated at 223 North Main St. TheI
store handles a high grade of im-
ported and domestic meats and cat-
ers to fraternity and sorority ac-
counts. Deliveries go out four times
a day and are handled by the Merch-1
ant's Delivery Co.
Ann Arbor Dairy
Ann Arbor's largest and most mod-
ermi milk plant is the Ann Arbor Dairy
on the corner of North Fourth and
Catherine. This concern was formed
some three years ago through the
consolidation of several local and1
minor milk dealers. The dairy de-
livers milk, cream, butter, cheese and
ice cream to many of the fraternities
and sororities along with many of
the houses and dormitories on the
campus.
Washington Bakery
One of the older institutions of
Ann Arbor is the Washington Bak-
ery at 213 East Washington Street,
which has been making bread, pies,
and all manner of pastry for the cit-
izens of this city since 1890. Start-
ing more than thirty years ago as a
mere hole in the wall with a small,
open furnace oven on which all the

John Kaupp, proprietor of the
Goodeats Cafe on Williams, between
State and Maynard, was for four
years in the location of the Forest
Lunch, on Forest near State Univer-
sity. The volume of his business be-
came so great-he tells this himself,
"many of the students on the more
pleasant days ate their mals outside,
under the trees, to afford more space
inside"-that he moved to his present
larger location. Mr. Kaupp is a
thoroughly experienced cook, having
been chef in some of the largest ho-
tels of the Northwest.
Van's Lunch
No eating place is perhaps betterl
known to .the student than Van's.
The student may be one of the 500
who every morning take advantage of
its strategic position on South Uni-
versity to break his fast; he may even
be one of the 300 that have been
known to participate in the single 8
o'clock rush.
Perhaps 'he isone of hose that go
to make up the 10 o'clock library
{ rush, or the after-theatre crowd, oz
the after-dance rush, or any of a half-
dozen other rushes or crushes, for
that matter. Or he may know Van's
only by reputation. But he knows
Van's.
To the graduate it would be
" Chat's". Not only the name has
changed, however,nbuttrecent altera-
tions have been made. The seating
capacity is doubled, and the floor
space is more than doubled. But in
spite of the increased capacity, much
more room could be utilized were it
!available. Van's is owned and man-
aged by Mr. G. C. Wilson.
Waiters Strike
OnTip{ System
Lisbon, Oct., 7. (By A. P.)-Lisbon
hotel and restaurant employes have
gone on strike to farce their em
ployers to grant them a percentage
of the customers' bills, instead of
the tipping system. The employes
claim that this method is being used;
in all the other countries of Europe,
and that it has proved beneficial to*
the employes and is approved by tho
traveling public.

cnenis the Mverchiants cienvery
Company.s
With the employment of such an or-

ganization the merchants are freed
from a very excessive burden of ex-j
pense, and at the same time are in a
position to give the people of this
community prompt delivery as well
as safe delivery.
The delivery concern makes four
deliveries from each of the stores
daily thus assuring them of a morn-
ing and afternoon delivery in all di-
rections.
Austin, Texas, Oct., 9-Stricter re-
quirements for admission into the
Law school of the University of Tex-
as have been enforced. In the fu-
ture, one credit in English, mathe-
matics, history, science, government,
economics, and business administra-
tion must be presented for admis-
sion.
Ithaca, Oct., 9-Failure to adjust
differeces between musicians jand
ktage employees has forced the shut
down of the entire Lyceum engage-
ments at Cornell this season.
Permanent
Wavino
We have an expert operator
in permanent waving and
marcelling. Let us give you
one to convince you.
Rainwater Shampoos
THE STODDARD
HAIR SHOPPE
707 N. University Ave.
Phone 2652
.I...............................

Faculty Member rf r.TRI Pill 1AIY
Is Lonesome On LECTICU AILEYI
Way ToYokohama! FER BusCOMPI
Prof. Harold P. Scott, formerly of Atlantic City, Oct. 9 (By
the rhetoric department, now on his I
Charges that many bus lin
way to Yokohama, has found that ers are exploiting the p
"parts of the Pacific are Pacific" and ,shaking down" electric
he is "willing to testify that other were made in a report draw
parts are .... not! This and other tric railway executives and
interesting information was contained the American Electric Rail'
in a letter received yesterday by Prof. 6ation convention today1
F. N. Scott of the rhetoric depart- Richardson, general manag
ment. Chicago surface lines.
The President Pierce took a notion "The spirit of promotio
to follow a fancy roll to an unusually ploitation, prevails in mostr
jazzy rhythm, but before this occurred developments," the report
the boat weathered a howling storm "Public enthusiasm over
and those on board had already got- driven vehicles is cloudi
ten their sea legs. It is ProfessorJ judgment. Many bus lines
Scott's opinion that a lot of good land developed solely to force pu
has been wasted under oceans. No an established railway, oth
doubt thousands of other ocean trav- mote bus sales." That elei
elers will agree with 'him. ways use buses in supplem
On board there are a number of ice was recommended.
interesting personages - a Bagdad "The rapid developmen
Jew, a Chinese Amah, and an Eng- automobile started a new
lish lord. The lord admits that he promotion and speculation
is traveling incognito. Englishmen portation," the report
do love to keep secrets! "From the irresponsiblej
In closing Professor Scott admitted grown the motorbus, and1
that the had played golf in many the enthusiasm over a ne
strange places, on hotel roofs, on Cal- transportation having a m
ifornia sand dunes, and with the reg- lance of value, destructiv
istering machine on the moon desk, tion has been freely estab
but he would give them all for one publicly welcomed..
drive on the home course. "The situation in manyc

NSW
JITION
A. P.)-
e promot-
ublic and
railways
n by elec-
A , read toJ
way Asso-
by r. A.
ger of the
n, or ex-
motor bu.9
declaref.
gasoline-'
ng sound
nare beAng
urchaso by
ers to pro-
ectric rail-
ental serv-
at of the
wave of
in trans-
continued.
jitney has
because of
w idea in
real semb-
e competi-
lished and
cities must

develop towards an economical co-
ordination of all essential public car-
riers.
"It is highly improbable that buses
can ever operate at a cost as low as
that of a street car with fixed charges
left out. Under comparable conditions
the bus is not able, on either con-
gested or free streets, to operate at
so high a speed as the street car.
In the relative use of street .space,
for each passenger served, consider-
ing area of vehicles and speed of
movement, street cars are approxi-
mately twice as efficient as buses.
"Bus operation that com.petes with
street railways is manifestly wrong.
Any bus system operating in or ad-
jacent to metropolitan areas served
by street cars is mpetitive ,
"Since buses operate ci public
streets without. being c1rarged for
paving maintenance and .installation
cost which the street rPsilways bear,
they are collecting a higjher fare with
a very low investment,/,"and are-rend-
ering only such service as is profit-
able, leaving the Lean lines, light
hours, and most of. the service in in-
clement weather to be furnished by
the railways. Destructive competi-
tion of this sort is totally unfair and
unjustifiable.
"Competitive corlitions in trans-
portation should not be permitted,
since the riding public must pay .a
higher cost due t. duplication."
PATRONIZE D. 'ILY ADVERTISERS

t

SUNDAY DINNER 12:30.2:00
n
632 FOREST PHONE 2641-R

THE EVOLUTION OF GOD THE
FATH ER

Is It a Christian Idea?
Next Sunday's Sermon -at

a 't
I,

The Unitarian Church
State at Huron

SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister

-V..'

Music by Male Quartette

1

Are You Going to College This Fall?
LET US HELP YOU
Forty-eight $100 Scholarships to Be Given Away to Introduce
CO0LLEGE LIFE
THE ONLY MONTHLY MAGAZINE
FOR COLLEGE FOLKS
One scholarship will be awarded in each state to the writer of the
best letter stating WHAT QUALITY YOU ENJOY MOST'
IN A TEACHER AND WHY.
Write on one side of paper only and limit letter to 200 words. Enclose $1 for
six months trial subscription 'to College Life. Regular price $3 a year.
Write name of state in upper left hand corner on address side of envelope
to facilitate sorting.
THIS OFFER CLOSES NOVEMBER 1
Scholarships will be awarded January 1 and the winners announced in our
January number. Trial subscription cpmmences at :that time.
COLLEGE LIFE
THE ONLY MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR COLLEGE'
FOLKS CONTAINS IN EACH ISSUE

i
f.
I
i
II
I

as Webb's lunch room, is an estab-
lish'ment of 37 years' experience in
catering to' the students' tastes for
sweets. In 1911 the present owner,
Charles Preketes, bought the est*b-
lishment and since then has built up
a large and thriving business. The
Sugar Bowl manufactures their own
candies and sweets, a great deal of I
which is sold wholesale to dealers
in Ann Arbor and neighboring cities.
Last spring the establishment was
remodeled so that more patrons
┬░tould be accommodated. Next spring
the owner intends to build another
candy shop at the corner of E. Lib-
erty Street and State Street, which
will be managed as a branch of the
downtown store.
NeCrunib Grocery
a The McCromb grocery,located at
1028 East University avenue, an-
nounces that it has more than
. doubled its business since last April,
when the management changed hands
to the present owners;, V. J. Mc-
Crumb and Ira Stoll. Mr. McCrumb
built the store at the present location
in 1914 and started a grocery busi-
ness that was soon to thrive. After
that. the business passed under the
management of two men who let the
.trade and general character of the
-estab Iisliment run clown. Mr. Mc-
Crumb and Mr. Stoll then took over
the proprietorship of the failing busi-
DesS six months ago and have built
doutof it a thriving and prospering
trade.
Dawn Donuts
Less than a year ago, on December
'1 091 ll) TY 'Jn flf4 1 - of 1.:. i ....t

'Mi
i
I
i
I
I
i
I
I
I
t
E

1 Y1 M1 1I 1 1 1I Y M~y I M IIII 11 11"I

SENSATIONAL PRIMA DONNA COLORATURA SOPRANO
OF THE
VIENNA AND METROPOLITAN OPERA COMPANIES *
WILL GIVE A

Hill
Auditorium

CO

T Thursday
October 23

CHORAL UNION SERIES
Also (November 3)

4, I,,k.

Guy Mater and Lee Pattison
THE WORLD'S MOST NOTED TWO-PIANO RECITALISTS

ARI

~ N . .'eI
44.~

And (November 19)
The Marriage of Figaro
THE HINSHAW OPERA COMPANY
WITH ORCHESTRA AND SIX FINE SOLOISTS

JEITZA

AN EDITORIAL by a eminent edu-
cator. Something to remember
and think about.
ATHLETIC NEWS of all colleges.
You do not need, to scan the
newspapers of forty-eight states
to get the records. -They are all
here written in a concise and
interesting form, with special
featurestof the bigger events.
SOCIAL NEWS-Doings of the fra-
ternal societies, outing clubs, etc.
The brighter side of college life.
BOOK RIEVIEWS-The best books
of the month reviewed with il-
lustrations and extracts from the

CONTRIBUTORS-The best talent
money can buy is represented
here-including many of our un-
dergraduate authors and artists.
FICTION
THE STORIS YOU HAVE BEEN
WISHING SOMEBODY WOULD
WRITE.
STORIES OF ATHLETIC COMBAT
CAMPUS LOVES
CLASSROOM STRATEGY

CLYTIE HINE, soprano, as "Countess Almaviva" ALFREDO VALENTI, baritone, as "Count Almaviva"
EDITHA FLEISCHER, soprano, as "Susanna" PAVEL LUDIKAR, baritone, as "Figaro"
CELIA TURRILL, soprano, as "Cherubino" RALPH BRAINARD, tenor, as "Basilio"
HERMAN GELHAUSEN, baritone, as "Dr. Bartolo"

p
X ,x . '.',..:

On (December 5)
Jascha HeILtz
SPECTACULAR RUSSIAN VIOLINIST

"' *-'w--m

original. SOMETHNG NEW AND VITALLY
ILLUSTRATIONS-Photographs by INTERESTING IN THE FIC-
the hundred. TION. LINE.
SNA PPYCOVERS
COLLEGE LIFE
THE ONLY MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR COLLEGE'
FOLKS is Timely. Forms for COLLEGE LIFE close just before
going to press. You will want COLLEGE LIFE. It keeps you
posted. All the college news. All the time. Gete the inside dope
about your rival .teams.
Use coupon below and adiress letter to
CONTEST EDITOR, COLLEGE LIFE, PORTLAND, ME.

?: .1

After Christmas (January

28)

Altred Cortot
STUPENDOUS FRENCH PIANIST
And (February 13)
Sophie BraslaT
LEADING NMETROPOLITAN OPERA CONTRALTO

3

Contest Editor,
College Life, Portland, Me.
S

Sept. ..........., 1924

f
i
ti
(
E

SEASON TICKETS for ALL SIX Concerts with Festival Coupon worth $3.00

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan