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January 23, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY

23, 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23,

.. . .

zky and other leaders of the comn-
munist faction of the Petrograd Sov-
iet had paved the way. The tottering
provisinal government was power-
less to save itself. After 24 hours
of almost bloodless skirmishing, dur-
ing which theaters functioned as us-
ual, while street fighting went on in
the next block, Kerensky had fled;
the rest of the provisional govern-
ment were prisoners; the city was
completely in the hands of the Soviets,
and Nikolai Lenine sat smiling in a1
little room at Sinolny Institute, apply-
ing his signature to proclamations he
had drawn up long before, announc-
ing the Proletarian Revolution in Rus-
sia and calling upon the proletarians
of the world to unite to asist them.,
In 1921, when the 'Soviet govern- l
ment had swept aside all military op-
position, and when Russia was, prac-
tically intact in communist hands,!
except for Poland, Finland and the
Baltic provinces, which broke off and
formed independent Republics, Lenine!
turned his hands to the task of build-
ing up the Russia the revolution shad
destroyed. To achieve this construct-
-ion. Lenine, with the daring that
characterized all of his major plans,
began what he call a stragetic re-f
treat from communism. A commun-
istic Utopia might be possible in
years to come, he said, but the ac-
tive communism as practised during
the period of the civil war had never.
been intended as permanent.
In the spring of 1922 Lenine's
health began to crack under the
strain. He became a victim of insom-
nia, and later on developed serious
nervous and gastric disorders. Al-
ways impatient of restraint, he would
not obey the commands of his Rus-
sian physicians or the advice of his
friends, and continued to work. In
the autumn of 1922 he suffered a ser-
ious attack, and for a long time his
life was despaired of. A number of
times he was reported dying, but un-.
der pressure from his associates he
at last consented to take a rest in
the country, ' and early in the year
1923 he appeared to be considerably
improved.
Physically Lenine was short, rather
plump, with a thick short neck, broad
shoulders, round, red face, high fore-
head, broad head, nose slightly up-
turned, brownish mustache and a
short, stubby beard. He has been de-
scribed as looking more like a country
grncer than a leader of men.
He was characterized by obser-
vers as the greatest intellectual force
in the Russian Revolution. He spoke
German. French and English, and read
works on economical problems in all
these languages as quickly as they
could be received in Moscow. Hav-
ing a world vision, and desiring a
world-revolution, he tried to keep in
touch with the thought and affairs of
all countries.

Knowts Tax ;Plan

WARTHIN RETURNS FROM
MEETING IN MONTREAL
Dr. A. S. Warthin, head of the de-
partment of pathology, returned Sun-
day night from a short trip to Mon-
treal, Canada, where he attended a
meeting of a medical committee of
which he is a prominent member.
Dr. Warthin is widely known for his
ability in the field of pathology, and
it was in this capacity that he was.
attending the meeting.
PAPERS TO BE REIEWED
01lr mor iNIioiPai1i11

President?

DAI91L PRESS. BREAKS
DOWN;,_CAUSES DELAY
A burned-out bearing in the ten-
horse power motor which drives the
printing press was the cause of the
delay in the distribution of yesterday's
Daily. The forms were on the press
at two o'clock and normally the en-
tire run would have been printed by
4 o'clock, but a bearing gave way
when scarcely a thousand papers had
been run. Mechanics labored over the
press constantly until, at 8:15 o'clock
it again started, finishing the output
at 9 o'clock. Carriershdistributedthe
Spapers as early in the day as free-
dom from 1classes would permit.

,"

N.

9 N

O NLY those who have
smoked Melachrinos
can judge the quality
of the finest Turkish
tobacco.

i

S.

A.- Gregg
A. W. Gregg is only 24, but he under-
stands the income tax so well that 'he
was chosen recently by A. W. Mellon,
secretary of the treasury,. to explain
the Mellon tax reduction plan to con-
gress. He is special assistant to Mel-
lon.
Student Council
To. Meet Tonight
Members of the Student council will
meet at 7:30 o'clock tonight at the Un-
ion for their regular semi-monthly
meeting. The weekly meetings have
been postponed during the winter sea-
son.
It's true efficiency to use Dail
dassiefieds--Adv.
Patronize The Daily Advertisers.
II ]

t uLFUtE ju uI1fl/ LJU L U DVI Li A series of moving pictures, loaned
__by the Motor Transport Corps and by
"Algae as Limestone Makers and W the North East Electric company, will
Climatic Indicators," by W. S. Clock, Natsho nScienc 1 au:dilocu tonight i
will be reviewed before the Geological Luis Filipe Corea dents taking Automobile Engineering
and Geographical Journal club by The next president of Nicaragua is The pictures will be open to the pub-
Prof. G. M. Ehlers at the regular dsC , lic
meeting of that organization, to be expected to be Luis Filipe Corea, say-
held at 7:30 o'clock Thursday eve- dispatches from Managua. Senor Corea 1 Hardig's Seeretary Gets Job
ning in room G-436, Natural Science formerly was the charge d'affaires of Washington, Jan. 22.-George B
building. -;his country in Washington and prac- Christian, Jr., of Ohio, formerly secre-
Robert B. Mitchell, '24, will review ticed law in New York for a time. tary to the late President Harding
two papers by E. M. Kindle at the was nominated Monday by President
same meeting. All who are interested Great Falls, Mont., Jan. 22.-A de- Coolidge to be a member of the fed-
in the topics are invited to attend the cision to go into voluntary liquidation eral trade commission.
meeting. was reached yesterday by stockhold-
--_ers of the Stockmen's National Bank It's true efficiency to use Laily
Patronize The Daily advertisers. of Fort Benton. Classifieds.-Adv

ORIGINAL

"The One

Cigarette Sold the World
ioIL

Over"

c nnouncin
a howinS of
MENS BEST
BRITISH FOOTWEAL
at
Wild &Co.

311 South State

Today

CHEMISTRY STUDENTS
SKED TOIIE E NAMES
Students who intend to work for
the Bachelor of Science degree in
chemistry are asked to leave their l
names with Prof. R. K. McAlpine, of
the chemistry department in order'
that a record may be available when
considering department plans. Profa
McAlpine's hours as advisor to chem-
istry students will be from 10 to 11
o'clock and from 2 to 3 o'clock daily
for the remainder of the week, in
room 406 of the Chemistry building
He will be in his office, from 2 to 3
o'clock daily during the first week of
examinations.

Mr. I. W. Diffee

f EP Rf VENTAT WE.4

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WHITENY THEATRE

MONDAY, JANUARY 28
S. NU[3 CTTHE ROMANTC
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DIRECT FR -Sw4EtrNE5S
ONE SOLIDSET TO MU51C
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