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January 19, 1924 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1924-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SM

-r

JU SMMER!
';HING COURlSESl

Started As Clerk;
Now Is President

Yost To Have General Charge; Will
Include All Major,
Minor Sports
┬░XPECT TOTAL ATTENDANCE
TO EXCEED THREE HUNDRED
Courses in the 1924 Summer Coach
ing school have been announced by
the Athletic association. The school
will open its third year June 23 for a
six weeks session ending August 1.
Coach Fielding H. Yost, director of
intercollegiate athletics, is director. s
Most of the courses offered for this
summer are similar to those given last
year. They include instruction in all
major sports, minor sports, athletic
leadership, administration, gymnastic
work, and physical education for boys.
These courses are all handled by
Michigan's regular coaching staff.
Announce Program{
The entire program of courses is
as follows: football and football
theory classes given by Coaches Yost,
Wieman and Little, basketball courses
by Coach Mather, baseball by Coach
Fisher, track by Coach Farrell and
Trainer Hoyt; athletic training by
Varsity trainers Hoyt and Fallen.
Coach Elmer D. Mitchell, will hold
classes in organized play and rec-
reation. Graded plays and games will
be given by Professor P. B. Samson:
organization and administration of
athletics, Coaches Little and Mitchell;
gymnastics and allied courses, Dr.
George May; first aid, Dr. Clyde Rey-
nolds and Boy Scouts leadership and
camping, Professor P. B. Samson.
Professor Samson is an addition to
the staff of next summer's school.
He is a professor of physical edu-
cation at the Michigan State Normal
school at Ypsilanti and holds two
national offices, being a special nat-
ional field commissioner of the Boy
Scouts of America and field investi-
gator of summer camps, Playground
and Recreation association of Amer-
ica,
Receive Applications
Applications are already being re-
ceived for this year's session. It is
expected that the total attendance
will reach more than 500. The first
year, 90 men attended, from 26 states,
and last year the enrollment reached
150.
The school was organized in 1922 by
Coach Yost for the purpose of train-
ng physical directors and coaches
for the schools of the country. Reg-
ular credit will be given in the School
of Physical Education for the work
done.
MILLONAIE CAADIA
Chicago,' Jan. '18-Arrested in a
dingyhotel, a man claiming to be
Russell T. Scott, former head of the
'Russell T. Scott Co., Ltd., of Toronto,
Canada, a $10,000,000 financial ser-
vice company, is being held on charges
of obtaining money under false pre-
tenses by substituting one kind of
grape juice on orders for another.
Less than a year ago, according to
his story, Scott was worth more than
$2,000,000 and had engineered the
financing of a proposed $30,000,000
bridge between Detroit and Windsor.
When his company failed for $2,000-
000, he paid it and turned the bridge
contract over to the United States
Steel Corporation, he said. In four
years he :expanded the company from
a single office with two salesmen to
an international concern with 80
branch offices, he told detectives.
After his company failed, he was
sued for $50,000 and a judgment of
$10,000 awarded against him, accord-
ing to his story. Fleeing from Can-
ada he assayed the role of an actor.
Later as a salesman for the Wheeler
Grape Co., of Hammondsport, N. Y.,
he is alleged to have bought cheaper
grape juice and substituted it for the
more expensive which his customers
ordered.[
Officials in Toronto and of the
Wheeler Grape 'Co. were notified of
his dentention.

DaIly classified for real results.

Harry F. BovardI
Harry F. Bovard, of Greensburg,
went into the coal business 32 years
ago as a clerk. The other day he
made president of the concern, the
Keystone Coal and Coke company, a
$10,000,000 corporation. He doesn't?
give any receipt for success.r
AWARD TEOORE l. VAL.
PUBLIC SRICE MEDALS1
Award of the Theodore N. Vail med-
als for "noteworthy public service"'
performed by telephone company em-
ployees was announced recently by the.
national committee of award, trustees
for the funds.
Mr. Vail was president of the Ameri-
can Telephone and Telegraph comp-
any to the time of his death in 1920,1
and was instrumental in the building
of the present Ball system. He was a
believer in the desirability of having
the ideals of service in the minds of
all his employees, and to the commem-
oration of the deeds ,which are daily
resulting from this policy, the Theo-
dore N. Vail Memorial Fund was or-
ganized.
Not more than 10 medals are given
during the entire year, the gold 'med-
als being accompanied by a cash
award of $500, and the silver medals
by $250. Bronze medals are awarded
by regional committees appointed by,
the National committee, and during
1922 more than 100 of these weret
awarded for acts of valor performedr
"for noteworthy public service".
From these bronze medal winners the
national committee chooses the win-
ners of the gold and silver medals.

TAPPING REORGANIZES SMOKING IS PROHIBITED 'BURTOI WILL ADDRESS
IN YOST FIELID HOUSE h
MICHIGANALUMNI CLUBS to Smoke laden air is disturbing J ALUMNI AT'CLEVELND
Etoathletes on contending teams C
I in the Yost field house, and dur- O8t
Special to The Daily ing any athletic contests hereaf- Special to The Daily
Ironwood, Mich., Jan. 18.-'. Hawv-Iter played there the ruling pro- Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 3$.-Presidentp
ley Tapping, 16L, field secretary 01 hibiting smoking within this Marion L. Burton, of the University' f
the Alumni association of the Univer-Ibuilding must be strictly adher-
sity of Michigan arrived here last ed to by everyone present. l of Michigan, will be, the principal
night and will hold a meeting this speaker at a banquet to be held in d
evening to reorganize the local club this city on Jan. 30 at the Union club ,
of the alumni of the University. ncnucinwt h ovnin
Mr. Tapn:aehe il ain conjunction with the convention' a
Mrrafigcmehrfollowing an Flood G rof all U. of A. alumni clubs in the
organization meeting of alumni in state of Ohio here on that day.
Duluth yesterday noon, at which more Office With witi- Preceding the dinner, a reception
than fifty graduates were present. Iwill be held at the UniOn ckb for
At that meeting, which was held in l
the grill of the Hotel Holland, the Girls from Vassar and girls from .President Burton and an opportunity
articles of association proposed by Smith, girls from numerous other i
the general Alumni association, were schools from all parts of the coun- .It is hoed that more than 500
accepted by the club, and a board ofIshosfo l prso h on alumni of the University will be Ares-{
governors was named for the coming try and Michigan's own girls have ent at the honorary dinner.
year. flooded the aYice of the Gargoyle with The first convention of the local
"Michigan has a very fine enthusi- contributions for the Girl's number' alumni clubs of the University in the
astic group of alumni in Duluth," said scheduled to appear Tuesday morn- third district of the reorganized gen-
Mr. Tapping upon his arrival here to- ing. eral alumni association will start at
day. "Most of 'the important judical So many contributions were re- 2 o'clock at the Big Ten University
positions in that section of the state ceived that it was found impossible 'club. Alumni matters in general, and
l are held by men who graduated from to use nearly all of them. By careful particularly matters pertaining to
the University." The field secretary selection the work of 32 of the con- local club activities will be discussed
left Ann Arbor last Saturday for a tributors was finally picked to grace at the convention. Election of ofli-
two weeks trip through the Upper tii ury was . ce s a the sto leion of offi-
Peninsula. In summing up the re- the January issue. cers for the state of Ohio will also
sults of histrp so far, he said: Anr Amajority of the contributions em- b te held.
"On Wednesday evening a dinner; bodied attempts to "razz" all boys in! Letters have been sent out by the,
meeting was held by the University of general. Some of the girls, perhaps Cleveland Alumni club, which is
Michigan club of Marquette county at with an eye to diplomacy, took the sponsoring the convention and the
Marquette at which a reorganization J-Hop as their subject. Three paro- banquet, to all men and women grad-
was effected with E. L. Miller, '82, dies of "I Learned about Women from I uates of the University of Michigan,
former varsity baseball star, elected Her" were among the articles sub- urging them to aid in staging the
president. Alumni were also present mitted and one of them will appear double events.
from Negaunee and Ishpeming. in the magazine. T. Hawley Tapping, field secretary
"More than 50 graduates were pros- ; of the general 'Alumni association,
ent at a dinner meeting in the Park Oei will be one of its representatives at
hotel in Sault Ste. Marie on Tuesday, Organ Recital the gathering. This is the first con-
both men and women. The women Set 'For" Sunday vention to be held by any district
laid plans to form their organization group.
as part of the general Alumni associ-
ation at Ann Arbor for the purpose Palmer Christian, University organ-
of aiding in the Michigan league drive. ist, will play a. varied and interesting I IT
program et the regular Sunday after- jjjf
noon concert tomorrow afternoon in
ISHill auditorium. This recital will
take the place .of the twilight organI ULIG o 1R68
recital which was omitted on Wed-TE
nesday. The program includes two Starr Trutscott, '09E, a graduate of
compositions by young American or- the department of naval architecture
C L b , lganists: Jepson of Yale University, will read a paper Tuesday, Jan. 22, atI
will speakat 6:30 ofo'clock ua and Cole of Chicago. A Sonata by i the General Motors building in DetroitI
rri s halp , immedi1ately ond Edward Elgar, whose work in the before one of the sessions of the an-
Ishe weeklyl smuet'ser fwhvinch field of oratorio is well known, heads' nual meeting of the Society of Auto-
held ast6 o'clok.e Forsuec Mr. the progran; a Toccata and Fugue motive Engineers on "The Engin-
Dibble has chosen "Opening the Oy- of Bach is also included. Mr. Christ- eering Romance of the Shenandoah."
ster" froin "Merry Wives of Windsor," ian will also play Saint-Saens' Mr. Truscott is a very distinguished
act 2. scene 2. "Swan," a,.id the. death .song from naval architect, with the United States
Mr. Dibble, who is'one of the better Wagner's 'Thristan and Isolde." navy according to Prof. F. W. Paw-
Snown younger attorneysaof the state .'This concert is free to the public; ing department, and is author of sev
has been interested for a nu.ber o. but small childrenwill not 'be;ad- ingldimportant, aengieering oforks.
years in the interpretation of religion mitted. Among other things he has.designed.
in terms :of modern thought. He .is __the____fl A ogatheins he hasneige
the author of "A Grammar of Belief" the floating gates of the Panama can-
It's true efficiency to use Daily al and recently he took a very prom-
a book used in Prof. R. M. Wenley's Classiflieds.-Adv... inent part in the design and construc-
course in philosophy of religion. "'tion of the giant dirigible the "Shenan-
- Patronize The Daily Advertisers. doah."
Prof. J. L. Markley, of the mathe-
matis iepartment, is ,confined, to, hi-
homie due to a slight indisposition.#
.-
Daily classified for reai results. i UooadfgClearance SaleofAllVelvet

Olivet President
Will Give Sermo;
Paul Voelker, president of Oliv
ollege, Mill speak at the Congreg
ional church, Sunday morning, o
The Need of Christian Education
Pres. Voelker has spoken here be
ore and is well known in Ann Arbo
Paul Blanshard '14, of New Yor
ity, lecturer and author, will con
duct an open forum at 7:30 o'cloc
Wednesday in the church under th
auspices of the Men's club.

HITNEYTHEATRE JANUARY 1

~TiiuphantTras-ontinentaITour
MR. WALKER
THE
A THRILLING MYSTERYPLAYOF
THE WILY WAYS OF INDIA
4LL SEATS RESERVE[

D

A DIFFERENT
HOUSE FOR
THE PART
CURTAINS
r. Made to Measurements, Give
k N AtiloSphere to Your Parl(
- j 'onie 2S
k PILBEAM & MARZ
e 206 S. Fourth

MAIL NOW.

Prices $1.10-$1.65-$2.20-$2.75

DUOFOLD STANDARDS IN LOWER PRICED PENS
Written with a Parker
by "Tex" Hamer, Pennsylvania's
famed football captain
akeall Parke wrs
As welt as the famous Duo fold
The sa~e classic shapeliness-The same writing balance
New Parker D.Q.--Students' Special, $3
HEN you buy a Parker Pen of any
model, at any price, you are getting
a standard that never existed before the
Parker Duofold was created; and which
exists today only in the Parker make.
Parker's lower priced black pens are like
Parker Duffold in everything save the size and
point. Yet even their points are tipped with
NATIVE Tasmanian Iridium and polished
to the smoothness of a costly jewel bearing.
Only the Parker crafts-guild is trained to make Duo.
f ker"qualityand this same skill produces all other
Parker Pens too.
If ybu'wantthe Over-size Pen with lacquer-red bar-
rel, flashing black tips and 25-year point-get Parker
Duofold$7. (Duofold Jr., or Lady Duofold, $5.)
If you want Duofold's classic lines and writing bal-
anbe in a low-priced black pen of good sizeget the
new Parker D. Q. specially made for stu-
dents, $3. The New Parker
Any nearby pen counter can supply you. DQ. has ar e ring
But be sure the pen is stamped "Geo. S. Par- or pkket-lip free.
ker" if you want the new-day improvements. Cap reinforced with
metal girdle.
THE PARKER PEN COMPANY a _
?ANEW V AJ...L.VV1.Q

i
i
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ORDER IT TODAY

Velour and Felt Hats at One-Half Price
Also
A GOOD SELECTION OF SILK HATS,
PUYEAR & HINTZ
S328S. MAIN STREET

Ii
'I

JA hz LLEI~h, Witt.
Manufacturers also of
Parker "Lucky Lock" Pencils

f ┬░ !

f f

ANN ARBOR DAIRY CO.

ICE CREAM

ICI + I
:
:
(i
:

1i~ SE

I
I

Banded Cap-Large Ring or Clip-Duofold Standards

FR SALE BY
Calkins-Fletcher Drug 5,:,~sSI~3Soe
Co. (3 stores) Quarry Drug Co S
Wahr's Book Store ..shing's DrugM ore
Chas.W s s Braham 0. U. Morrill
(2 stores) Slater's Book Store Miler & Fuller

T

I

You'll like it's delicious flavor---It's
velvety smothness--It's good for you, 00

DELIVERIES MADE IN TIME
FOR DINNER TOMORROW

r;

Pocke Maled Milk!
Like to drink malted milks?
Sure thing, Old Top!I
Then why not eat 'em-
here's your chance.
THOMPSON'S
Pure Malted Milk Bars
contain no cane or beet sugar
Safe for Athletes in Training
Right size for your pocket. Go
great at the game-atthe show-on
hikes--at school or in your room.

iI'l

.Ann Arbor Dairy Company Ice Cream
Now Served at the Following Places:

t
. .
THE PARK LANE-he lightweight overcoat
accepted by American and English university men-
comes in a distinctive pattern of Shetlandsingle-breast-
ed, with a Chesterfield fly -front and a straight box-
back. Seams are wide and silk-faced inside. Reach-
ing about three inches below the knee, it's a smart and
popular coat for the late winter. Forty dollars, ready
to put on.
The Hat, ROYCELYN,,is the prevailing model.

: I If

THE MICHIGAN UNION
THE BETSY & ROSS SHOP
THE ARBOR FOUNTAIN
and dozens of other places

Taming those
blooming, whiskers

I

'I
ii
I

H AVE a clean, cool shave-
quick! You need more than
lather and a sharp razor. Tha
keenestblade grows dull and pu1
unless you use a supple, pliable
shaving brush whose bristles have
just the correct degree of stiffness
to massage your beard.
3 shaving brush
comforts
You willfind a Rubberset Brush
has 3 important comforts.
Your beard, however tough,
softens easily, as Rubberset's fine,
full bristles whip up a quick, gen-
erous lather...one that goes to
the roots of each hair, holds it
firmly erect, easy to cut.
Rubbingin the lather withyour
fingers becomes unnecessary.
Rubberset bristles are gripped
everlastinglyin hard rubber. They
can't come out and mix with the
lather.
Each Rubberset Brush is guar-
anteed-unconditionally. The
bristles stay in. t .n<A_ good or
we do. Get yo^,,r7 t-> at any
store on the campus. Made by
Rubberset Company, Newark,
N. J., U. S. A.

11

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Telephone

423

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