100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 02, 1923 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1923-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DETROIT CHURCHES
SUPPORT PROHIiTION
Detroit, Oct. 1. -- A prohibition
platform consisting of six planks was
adopted by the Detroit council of
churches at its fall meeting. Bringing
back of light wines and beer was
condemned by the council as an "un-
principled minority" seeking to "des-
troy manhood and befoul chastity."
Adoption of the prohibition plat-
form and the tabling of a resolution
condemning the Ku Klux Klan feat-
ured the session. Several members
of the council denounced the organ-
ization but other speakers asserted
there had. been so much exaggeration
reegarding activities of the klansmen1
that more data should be gathered be-
fore a resolution condemning the or-i
ganization was adopted.
S. C. A. Claims Best Directory
Lane hall claims to have the most
complete directory that is on the cam-
pus to-day, excluding the compilation
which is possessed by the University.
The directory is composed of both men
and women students written on cards
filed in alphabetical order and will be
used up to the time the permanent one
is issued.

..:_____ THE MICHIGAN DAILY_:__
CwistledtinHsldCniversity all have been unabeidents i en this college at 3 o'clock to- Charles S. Frazei, and Samuel R
chos n N w H ad PR~iC ~to find parking space nearby. morrow afternoon in room 203, Tap- Parsons both instructors in physics
Of R. 0. T. C. Here If enforcement is found necessary pan hall. in the University last year have re-
liolrr ~nlnln il ficials plan to station men .at the The purpose in viet, according tosgnd M.Frz sa teBru
9 uni rrrr: i bR~v~ru~ entrance to the various drives who Dean Edward H. Kraus of the phar- signed.Mr. razel is at the Bureau
will investigate incoming cars. The macy college, is to obtain some in. of Nitrogen Fixation of the Depart-
brass tags that will be issued to per- dication beyond the high school rec- ment of Agriculture in Washington
IUNIVERSITY OFFICIALS RECEIVE sons, who will have the right to park ord of what may be expected from the Mr. Parsons received an associated
TAGS; WILL ENFORCE RULE are stamped with the number 3, to: students during the course of their professorship at the University of Ar-
iF NECESSARY indicate the year 1923, the serial study. kansas.
(number of the tag, and the license The tests that will be given will be --- -
number of the car. based on those prepared by the Bur- Daily classified for real results
Student automobiles are prohibitediDalyr ae eestt and Measurements at
from parking in the campus drive- Washington. They have been used
ways according to a rule recently with considerable success as an en---
passed by the Board of Regents whichU U trance requirement at Columbia and
nominally went into effect yesterday. REhUIREDnasernUnBerites
The tags that will. be issued to mem-RO Ao er s
bers of the faculty, administrative of- Changes Made In
ficials and employees of the Univer--ge Ma eI
sity are now being distributed at the In order that the faculty of the Physics Faculty
office of Secretary Shirley Smith in College of Pharmacy may have a bet-
University hall. ter idea of the ability and mental en- Three changes have altered the fac-
:IkntThree

thne measure was not ta en espec-
ially to prohibit the use of the stu-
dent automobiles, according to Mr.
Smith, but more on account of the
increased number of business and
professional men who need the park-1
ing spaces insid'i of the campus. Dur-'
ing the past year the space has been
so crowded that men having business

dowment or stuaents enrolled in the1
college, all men and women who en-
ter the school from this date on.
-x;iether freshmen or students with
advanced credit, will be required to
take a series of intelligence tests that
will be given by Prof. Guy M. Whipple
of the School of ducation. They will
be given the first time to new stu-

ulty roster of the Physics department
during the summer. Oskar Klein has
been appointed to tne raculty, as an
Instructor. He received the degree of
Ph.D. at the University of Copenha-
gen and taught at the University of
Lund in Sweden during the past
year.

AT THE THEATERS
Screen-Today
Majestic - Beatrice Joy and
Owen Moore in "The Silent
Partner."
Arcade - Hope Hampton and
Conrad Nagel in "Lawful Lar-
ceny."
Wuerth-Jack Pickford in "Oar-E
rison's Finish." I
Orpheum-Douglas Fairbanks in
"Robin Hood."
Stage-This Week
Whitney - ichigan Repertory
Theater, "The Mollusc."
Garrick-"Dangerous People."

Major W. T. Carpenter
William T. Carpenter has been en-
gaged by the University to handle the
administration of the Department of
Military Science and Tactics follow-
ing the resignation of Major Robert,
Arthur who left a short time ago to
take up work at Fort Monroe. He is
a graduate of the engineering depart-
ment of the University of Kentucky
and saw service as an officer during
the Spanish-American and World
wars.
Improve Alaskan Railways
Fairbanks, Alaska, Oct. 1-(Dy A.
P.)--Construction of terminal facili-
ties for the Alaska Railroad here is
progressing rapidly with a large
force of men at work. The improve
ments include passenger and freight
depots, engine and oil houses, water
tanks and other buildngs, to cost in
all between $250,000 and $300,000.
THE BUSY BEE
PASSES
WATCH FOR OPENING
OF-
THE ARBOR FOUNTAIN
Daily classified for real results.
Patronize The Daily advertisers.

IfPost I
Tavern

I

"What a difference
Just a few cents make 1

FATIMA

I

dm'

Fj

it

r

COMMUNICATION

Er

Granger's

7

Attendance

to

be

Limited

The number present at the opening assembly Friday night-four hun-
dred and fifty couples--was unavoidable, as the large number from
outside the city was not expected. It being the opening party and the
management not announcing a limit-could not refuse them admittance.
The, Saturday night attendance-three hundred and twenty-eight
couples-danced with plenty of room. The limit for all assemblies from
now on will be three hundred and fifty couples, and positively no excep-
tion will be made to this rule. Other corrections will be made at once

r4

and every ef
AL

ffort used to justify your support.

4
Mimi ;won

4~

I//
%i

e Ir,.

--

...

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan